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Double Headed George VI Penny Coin. Rarity?


Philiman
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Hi Everyone.

 

I've come into the possession of a British old one penny coin with the head of King George VI stamped on both sides. Obviously because of this there is no date but it was with a late collection of old British one penny coins dating from the 1860's through to the 1960's.

 

Everything seems okay with the coin and the heads on both sides face to the left when the coin is spun on a vertical axis.

 

Is this a rarity? Was it an error that got 'through the system'? Could someone have made it for 'fun' at the mint? Does it have any possible value?

 

Any information would be greatly appreciated.

 

Many thanks.

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Welcome to the forum, Philiman! ;)

 

 

The likely explanation for your item is that it is a fabrication of two coins. These are fairly commonly come across as two such pennies are worked and then skilfully attached together to make it look like a two-headed penny, perhaps as an aid to magic tricks or to ensure they always win a toss. :ninja:

 

If you post some detailed photographs of the coin we might might be able to shed some more light upon its origin.

 

One suggestion I have is to compare your piece with another penny of the era, have them face to face and compare the width or just look for a margin where they have been joined.

 

The value of such a joined coin is often more than a coin of the same condition of a normal disposition. At least £10, I would have thought.

 

I hope this helps somewhat.

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Welcome to the forum, Philiman! ;)

 

 

The likely explanation for your item is that it is a fabrication of two coins. These are fairly commonly come across as two such pennies are worked and then skilfully attached together to make it look like a two-headed penny, perhaps as an aid to magic tricks or to ensure they always win a toss. :ninja:

 

If you post some detailed photographs of the coin we might might be able to shed some more light upon its origin.

 

One suggestion I have is to compare your piece with another penny of the era, have them face to face and compare the width or just look for a margin where they have been joined.

 

The value of such a joined coin is often more than a coin of the same condition of a normal disposition. At least £10, I would have thought.

 

I hope this helps somewhat.

 

 

Many thanks 'YeOldeCollector'.

 

Very close inspection shows the coin to indeed be a 'fake', but very, very well done. Someone went to a lot of trouble to hide the 'join'.

 

I may keep it. It could come in handy to resolve arguments with the 'other half' LOL!

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