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Liverpool Royal Institution medal


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Hi

 

I am researching my families history and wondered if anyone here could throw any light on why a family member would have received this medal. It is dated 1814 and awarded to a 'Miss J Slater'. I understand looking through the records here it was a 'peace' medal. Would this have been given to her to recognise someone who fought in the Nepolonic wars?

 

And help would be lovely!

 

The head side has a helmeted lady facing right with a liver bird on the helmet. On the reverse is just oak and olive leaves around the edge. There is also the number 169 and Miss J Slater in the centre.

 

 

Many thanks in advance

Lisa

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Hi Lisa & welcome.

 

It is a prize medal, it is a coincidence that the Liverpool Royal Institution was established in 1814 the same year as Napoleon's first defeat & exile to Elba. It did not in fact open that year & the formal opening only took place 25 November 1817. The "Royal" was not officially added till 1821 when a royal charter was granted, this prize medal by T. Wyon was engraved later than 1814 but dated 1814 for the establishment. The medal was awarded to students of science & the literature and arts programmes. The same design & date was used over many years, albeit with slight changes as new dies had to be made as the old dies became worn. Yours is the early type Davis & Waters 337 (crest on helmet) They are made in silver, bronze & white metal.

 

This site has 3 of these medals, scroll just over halfway down

http://www.simmonsgallery.co.uk/2001site/m...cal-medals4.htm

 

 

The Liverpool Royal Institution was formally dissolved in 1948.

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Constanius, the amount of knowledge you possess and your willingness to share it always amazes me.

 

Beautiful medal by the way.

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So that would date the strike on this as post 1821 at the earliest. Any ideas when?

 

I found a conflicting date re the royal charter in 'The King's artists: the Royal Academy of Arts and the politics of British Culture, 1760-1840' by Holger Hoock 2005, Page 103 footnote 107 "The Liverpool Academy from c.1820 was the exception among provincial academies in being closely related to an institution with a royal charter, the Liverpool Royal Institution(charter 1817). Cf. Omerod, Liverpool Royal Institution"

 

Seeing as this date(1817) for the granting of the charter has a reference (the previous date 1821 I posted was from Wikipedia) I lean towards 1817. It is still possible that the Prince regent had allowed them to use 'Royal' from the opening in November 1817 but he did not actually grant a royal charter until after he became king. Seeing that they would need a prize medal soon after the opening in 1817 I think we would be safe in using that date for the medal. The royal charter was only required to grant degrees, so perhaps could have been granted up to 4 years later.

 

Curiously Forrer attributes the Liverpool Royal Institution; Prize medal 1814; Rev. Wreath; signed P.WYON S.C. to Peter Wyon. Maybe he misread the T for P? because Forrer also attributes, Liverpool Royal Institution, founded 1814 to Thomas Wyon senior, signed T.Wyon! Christopher Eimer attributes it to Thomas Wyon Jr., if he is correct it must be 1817(the year he died), seems unlikely to be him though as he signed T. Wyon Jun.

 

I assume you know that it is the Liver bird on the helmet.

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  • 10 years later...
On 8/12/2010 at 9:57 AM, Lisa3745 said:

Hi

 

I am researching my families history and wondered if anyone here could throw any light on why a family member would have received this medal. It is dated 1814 and awarded to a 'Miss J Slater'. I understand looking through the records here it was a 'peace' medal. Would this have been given to her to recognise someone who fought in the Nepolonic wars?

 

And help would be lovely!

 

The head side has a helmeted lady facing right with a liver bird on the helmet. On the reverse is just oak and olive leaves around the edge. There is also the number 169 and Miss J Slater in the centre.

 

 

Many thanks in advance

Lisa

This very old post came up as I am currently researching the proprietors of Liverpool's Royal Instituition this includes Miss Joyce Slater and her family.  I believe the medal was given in recognition of her being an original  subscriber, also know as silver ticket holder  requiring  an investment of £100 at the time. The no on the reverse us their given shareholder no. I have more info I can share if the original poster is still interested and  wants to get in touch.

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