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My new 1909 poltina arrived today!


bobh
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Now that I have actually received the coin, I feel comfortable to announce that this one is now mine:

;)

G&M Auction 187, lot 3335 - 50 kopecks 1909

03335a00.jpg03335r00.jpg

The pictures don't really do it justice. I think it would easily grade MS-63, but there is a little rim ding at 12 o'clock (hardly noticeable, though).

 

So now my run of poltinas goes from 1907 all the way up to 1914 (both obverse types) including 1913-EB!

:ninja:

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Now that I have actually received the coin, I feel comfortable to announce that this one is now mine:

;)

G&M Auction 187, lot 3335 - 50 kopecks 1909

03335a00.jpg03335r00.jpg

The pictures don't really do it justice. I think it would easily grade MS-63, but there is a little rim ding at 12 o'clock (hardly noticeable, though).

 

So now my run of poltinas goes from 1907 all the way up to 1914 (both obverse types) including 1913-EB!

:ninja:

Congratulations on your addition of this attractive piece to your collection! ;)

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Thanks for the nice comments, everyone! :ninja:

 

I finally got around to taking my own pictures. Now I am thinking more like AU-58, because there are just too many little marks and chatter on the obverse to make it into MS territory (at least not with NGC or PCGS). Here are my own pics:

 

RUSSIA_50_Kopecks_1909_obv.thumb.jpgRUSSIA_50_Kopecks_1909_edge.thumb.jpgRUSSIA_50_Kopecks_1909_rev.thumb.jpg

 

Doesn't come close to my 1910 poltina! But it's still a nice coin (and rare!).

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Now I am thinking more like AU-58, because there are just too many little marks and chatter on the obverse to make it into MS territory (at least not with NGC or PCGS).

 

Do you plan to send it for grading - just to find out for sure?

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Do you plan to send it for grading - just to find out for sure?

Not just yet. I have a lot of coins that I should submit, but living in Switzerland it isn't so easy. NGC does have an office in Switzerland now, but I need to choose very carefully which ones I will have certified. Maybe in a year or two...

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my question might need separate post ..... it is might be to easy to answer: how to read all singes and symbols from the package of the certified coin:

i have one and all what i have on the package:

1827 Cent, C72 Netherlands, F-12 , 2034495 National Numismatic Certification. Is there any instructions how to read it? What all those symbols means? Is there any way to check if certificate number respond to the coin inside ?

 

I need help with that.

Thank you in advance

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my question might need separate post ..... it is might be to easy to answer: how to read all singes and symbols from the package of the certified coin:

i have one and all what i have on the package:

1827 Cent, C72 Netherlands, F-12 , 2034495 National Numismatic Certification. Is there any instructions how to read it? What all those symbols means? Is there any way to check if certificate number respond to the coin inside ?

 

I need help with that.

Thank you in advance

Each grading service has their own numbering and label scheme. 1872 would be the date on the coin; C72 is probably a catalogue number (such as Krause-Mishler, also used by NGC for example). F-12 is the grade according to the 70 point scale commonly in use in the USA, and the longer number would be some ID number which is unique for NNC slabs.

 

Note that the grade is only an opinion ... a lot of collectors might disagree with the grade in one direction or the other. However, some grading companies such as PCGS and NGC offer a guarantee.

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Each grading service has their own numbering and label scheme. 1872 would be the date on the coin; C72 is probably a catalogue number (such as Krause-Mishler, also used by NGC for example). F-12 is the grade according to the 70 point scale commonly in use in the USA, and the longer number would be some ID number which is unique for NNC slabs.

 

Note that the grade is only an opinion ... a lot of collectors might disagree with the grade in one direction or the other. However, some grading companies such as PCGS and NGC offer a guarantee.

 

 

i have this coin, but i do not have hologram on the package , should it have any?

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I finally got around to taking my own pictures.

 

I also like to take pictures of the coins that I buy. I claim no expertise in coin photography but I did find an easy way to get acceptable quality images - axial light set-up. Probably many members of this forum are familiar with this method, but I hope that those who are not might find it useful.

 

As an illustration, I have attached a couple of images of my recent acquisition. Both images were taken using the same camera and the same light source, but the difference is quite noticeable. The above method is shown on the left and a simple lighting from above is on the right. I wonder how the Bob's coin would look like if photographed using that approach (I guess no less than MS62 :ninja: )

 

 

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I also like to take pictures of the coins that I buy. I claim no expertise in coin photography but I did find an easy way to get acceptable quality images - axial light set-up. Probably many members of this forum are familiar with this method, but I hope that those who are not might find it useful.

 

As an illustration, I have attached a couple of images of my recent acquisition. Both images were taken using the same camera and the same light source, but the difference is quite noticeable. The above method is shown on the left and a simple lighting from above is on the right. I wonder how the Bob's coin would look like if photographed using that approach (I guess no less than MS62 ;) )

Nice photos (and nice coin, too)! :ninja: And thank you for sharing this interesting link.

 

I tend to use either indirect sunlight (as for the pictures of my poltina) or a light tent, similar to the one described in the article. The lights are daylight bulbs -- at least they claim they are. I always need to adjust the white balance a bit, camera WB turns out to be around 7500, and I turn it up to about 8500-9500 in the Gimp UFRaw importer tool (I work on Linux Ubuntu). I use 3 or 4 light sources. While the tent works great for coins which are UNC or nearly so, it tends to overemphasize any marks in the fields. Sunlight will give me deeper fields and better color, but sometimes make the coin look a little flat. I've been experimenting for years, and I still find that I need to adjust everything to the coin -- every single coin is different and needs different lighting, IMHO.

 

I believe that the coin photos in the G&M auction were all taken with straight-on axial lighting or flash, but they look a little unnatural at times (of course, the flash lighting they use in a professional studio environment is completely different from the built-in flash on the camera). I am trying to achieve something "in between" that and what I came up with here. I will certainly try some of the hints given in the article, though ... thanks again! ;)

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  • 1 month later...
I also like to take pictures of the coins that I buy. I claim no expertise in coin photography but I did find an easy way to get acceptable quality images - axial light set-up. Probably many members of this forum are familiar with this method, but I hope that those who are not might find it useful.

 

As an illustration, I have attached a couple of images of my recent acquisition. Both images were taken using the same camera and the same light source, but the difference is quite noticeable. The above method is shown on the left and a simple lighting from above is on the right. I wonder how the Bob's coin would look like if photographed using that approach (I guess no less than MS62 ;) )

 

Thank you, altyn, for providing this suggestion and link! :ninja:

 

I'm beginning to like it ... although it is sometimes difficult to get a good picture with this technique through a plastic slab. Here is a 1913-ЭБ poltina of mine in a NGC slab (AU-55):

1913_EB_obv.thumb.jpg1913_EB_rev.thumb.jpg

 

1909 (and others) are soon to come!

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Here is the 1909 coin taken with axial lighting:

 

1909_EB_obv.thumb.jpgRUSSIA_50_Kopecks_1909_edge.thumb.jpg1909_EB_rev.thumb.jpg

 

In many ways a definite improvement over sunlight (thanks, altyn!). However, I am not sure that this technique is good for every kind of coin, and sunlight has definite advantages for some things. But I am finding out that it is sometimes difficult to get a good focus unless the lighting is VERY subdued; otherwise, because of overexposure, the auto-focus mechanism in the lens gets confused.

 

When buying coins which were photographed with this technique, I think you have to be very careful because it is easy to overexpose the fields, thus covering up any blemishes the coin might otherwise have. For AU/BU and proof coins, though, this technique definitely shows the coins to the best advantage.

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