Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Coins resculpted in plastic


Recommended Posts

Recently a guy came to the forgerylist complaining that he bought a coin that had been reconstructed using plastic. Here are the images:

 

 

 

Hadrianobv.jpg

 

 

 

Hadrianrev.jpg

 

 

 

Here is what he bought (not cheap mind you but of course the coin is in great shape!!)

 

 

 

Here is what he was left with after a soak in acetone

 

 

 

Hadrianobv1.jpg

 

 

 

HadrianRev1.jpg

 

 

 

Apparently this coin of Geta was given a similar treatment:

 

 

 

Getarev.jpg

 

 

 

Getarev1.jpg

 

 

 

http://www.numismatikforum.de/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=35424

 

 

 

In one soak a very expensive coin turned into a not so expensive coin for the unsuspecting buyer. It seems this is not that terribly rare. Seems easier to do an make it look convincing than to retool.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They are both real but very damaged, they were re-sculpted with some type of plastic that came off when dipped in acetone. The top coin was bought for a premium price. I guess the guy who bought it suspected something, dipped the coin and the details made from plastic came off. Someone was trying to sell a low end coin for high end money by re-sculpting the details.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I think the reconstruction/surgery was a great job, but...

If someone sells such a coin he should clearly indicate this and the pricing should be significantly lower than for a coin with complete patinata.

 

The problem is: The online market drift in the direction `sold as seen on the screen´, no returns and no refund. Ancient coins are sold if they ONLY look good. There is a certain market for good looking but tooled coins with extra sharp details.

 

The dealer reputation, trust, experience and contact gets more and more meaningless.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Recently a guy came to the forgerylist complaining that he bought a coin that had been reconstructed using plastic. Here are the images:

 

/**/

 

In one soak a very expensive coin turned into a not so expensive coin for the unsuspecting buyer. It seems this is not that terribly rare. Seems easier to do an make it look convincing than to retool.

 

This is really amazing to me and thanks much for the posting. On the one hand, I am very impressed by the degree of retooling done with the adulterant - that lettering that is presumed to be artificial fits very well to my eyes and some of it is almost entirely 'plastic'. The areas in the second coin where you see the divots after the acetone look somewhat suspicious in the 'before' picture (of course, it's easy to be suspicious when you look at the after picture).

 

Can we completely rule out effects of the acetone? I know acetone *should* not react with copper and this gets tossed around from time to time on the boards, with some swearing that acetone has messed up their copper (nothing like this case though). I have had the experience of acetone mottling the surface luster/toning on a Lincoln before see Evil Acetone Definitely nothing like we see in your pics - but could acetone do a number on patina?

 

Also, can we rule out that the dip was not something else (such as a diluted acid which is typically contained in silver dips)?

 

Looks like a putty job, but I am still curious - does anyone else know more about such matters?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...