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What does the future hold for Russian Coins?


Rhino
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My guess is that anything dated before either 50 years or 1945 is subject to having to get a license to take it out - since it is "cultural property". Curiously this type of law is also on the books in China, but that doesn't stop you from hauling off several hundred year old cash coins like I did a few years ago. The laws are meant to be in place to permit their stopping you from taking something old out, but really it is practically impossible to eliminate all forms of stuff leaving a country unless it is North Korea or something.

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You know what I reckon it is - it's got to do with economic wealth within a country.

 

With regards to the crazy custom laws - it's pretty obvious that while it is done to protect cultural goods to be exported overseas, it is also another way of raising revenue. The same reason why this goes for people who needs to apply for tourist visa - money.

 

I reckon within the next 20 years or so when the Russian economy becomes better and is more tourist friendly, these custom laws will be more laxed. This has happened in many cases with other countries who used to be poor and have become more prosperous.

 

As for now, while I believe there's still room for prices to raise, at the same time I think it's going a bit too far. With the exception of rare, scarce coins, they have go down soon or later.

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Speaking of coin prices, does anyone think that this is a bit extreme?

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...em=260562676496

 

The price is extreme, but having lived in Israel for a while I gotta say that the seller is RUNNING to the bank right now ;) $450 is a lot of money anywhere, and it's an especially large sum in Israel. He just walked away with almost 2000 Shekels (Israeli currency) and that is BIG money.

 

I looked at the bid history, didn't notice anything too unusual... no low-feedback bidders raising the price, no one with a huge % of having business with the seller. I think it's just those 2 or 3 bidders that REALLY wanted the coin and kept outbidding each other :ninja:

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looks like a bidding war to me. The seller did quite well. But then again, you cant just go out and a buy a Peter III 4 kopek for a couple hundred dollars any time you want, can you? They dont show up on ebay too often. (at least genuine ones, anyway)

I was wondering if it might be a cast fake? The surface looks rather suspicious, IMHO. Also, judging by the distance between the "2" in the date and the arrow next to it, it looks like it must be Brekke 10. However, the digit "6" looks wrong, and the loop on the drum (the one on the left) is too big for Brekke 10. All the other illustrations in Brekke show the arrow much closer to the digit "2".

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looks like a bidding war to me. The seller did quite well. But then again, you cant just go out and a buy a Peter III 4 kopek for a couple hundred dollars any time you want, can you? They dont show up on ebay too often. (at least genuine ones, anyway)

 

 

Here is another one. Just listed :

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/RUSSIA-SCARCE-4-KOPEKS...=item519120547b

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I was wondering if it might be a cast fake? The surface looks rather suspicious, IMHO. Also, judging by the distance between the "2" in the date and the arrow next to it, it looks like it must be Brekke 10. However, the digit "6" looks wrong, and the loop on the drum (the one on the left) is too big for Brekke 10. All the other illustrations in Brekke show the arrow much closer to the digit "2".

 

IMHO the coin looks genuine, can never be 100% sure these days. There were many die variations on this series. I can't figure out why it sold so high. These are always in demand, so maybe $200 or a bit more is what I would have expected.

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IMHO the coin looks genuine, can never be 100% sure these days. There were many die variations on this series. I can't figure out why it sold so high. These are always in demand, so maybe $200 or a bit more is what I would have expected.

 

I think it's fine.

 

As Alex points out these are popular, and $400 is quite possible (though on the high side). While it is closest to B10, Brekke doesn't show all the die varieties. For his book, the determinant of a variety is the number of dots in/around the 4 and 1762.

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With all the recent discussion on the value of some imperial poltinniks, it got me thinking:

 

What do you think the future holds for Russian coin collecting?

 

I plan on keeping my collection in the family and passing it down to another generation - what do you think 5, 10, 20, even 50 years from now will look like? Will the prices keep rising? Will the market stay hot, or will prices go down? Will Soviet coins become more popular?

 

All opinions are welcomed, I'd like to see what the more experienced collectors on here think :ninja:

 

This is one of the most interesting questions on this site and probably the most difficult one to answer, because you are literally asking people to predict the future.

 

Instead of telling you whether I think Russian coin prices will go up or down, I will tell you that I see positive signs for the short term and not so good signs for the long term.

 

Russians are now getting richer and the middle class is growing--good for coin prices. After 10 or so years of economic and social mayhem people are longing for the calm old days -- also good for coin prices.

 

Now here is the part where I stick my neck out and wait for the hate mail. When I was a kid growing up in Russia it felt like every other friend of mine collected coins. Now, however, when I go to Russia and visit coin shops, I don't see any kids there. When I ask my friends who now have kids of their own if the younger generation are interested in numismatics they all tell me the answer is "no". Another bad sign is that Russian population is set to fall significantly over the next 30 or 40 years--so that too means fewer collectors.

 

Once again, not making any predictions here, but just pointing out some things...

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Another bad sign is that Russian population is set to fall significantly over the next 30 or 40 years--so that too means fewer collectors.

 

i was wondering if you could highlight where this data coma from :ninja:

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