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USA 1 cent 1935 tonned metal coin


netFish
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I've got this coin today and looked strange to me: I can not decide one thing: strange good or strange cheap?

 

Here is pictures:

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Clearly i can see two types of metal, coin is made of two types:Linkoln's head and body are different then his neck and rest of coin.

I tried t odo my best with pictures. :ninja:

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This looks like it has been dug up. If so, it was probably resting on something which caused the corrosion to be uneven. I have seen this many times when metal detecting. It always amazes me how copper and bronze react after several years in wet dirt. I have puuled out a victorian sixpence in one farm field that was badly pitted and corroded, despite being good silver. Then in another farm field I pulled a bronze penny with the most amazing evenly dark green petina all over both sides.

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My first impression is gum or a similar substance. It's not at all unusual to find pennies with bits of gum or glue stuck to them, and if nobody was willing to scrape the gum off for a year or two, the gum would have protected that part of the coin from wear and corrosion. How did you get the coin?

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I've never seen corrosion quite like that (the band of heavier wear across his neck/chin is very interesting), but I'm afraid it's not going to be worth too much. Still, I've only ever found 5 pre-1940 wheat pennies over the past two years during which I handled more than $75 worth of pennies, so a '35 in change is certainly noteworthy in its own respect.

 

After looking at the penny a bit closer, I think I may have a new hypothesis. Note that there are two distinct areas of lighter corrosion, both of equal width and running vertically down the coin. I'd bet that was a piece of tape. Someone was probably building a collection, and rather than purchasing a folder for the pennies, decided to tape them to a board or sheet of paper to keep them organized. The tape was probably put on lightly, and oxygen was able to slip under the middle section. It probably remained in the collection for a while, and then in the usual course was liberated and slipped into circulation.

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This looks like it has been dug up. If so, it was probably resting on something which caused the corrosion to be uneven. I have seen this many times when metal detecting. It always amazes me how copper and bronze react after several years in wet dirt. I have puuled out a victorian sixpence in one farm field that was badly pitted and corroded, despite being good silver. Then in another farm field I pulled a bronze penny with the most amazing evenly dark green petina all over both sides.

Not at all amazing. All over the World we have been burning Sulfur rich coal in power stations, steel mills, other factories that have furnaces or boilers. The emissions from those are in the form of SO or SO2. In the air this mixes with H OH other wise kown as H2O or water vapors. The combination is now a weak Sulfurous or Sulfuric Acid. During normal rains this falls out and is known as Acid rain. It corrodes away at statues and many other structures. If you have any outdoor Copper or Brass pipes, you would see them turning green from this reaction. In some areas Copper Grounding systems have been completely erroded away by this.

So a coin in the ground too ends up looking like that one.

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