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A time when I would crack a coin out of the slab


thedeadpoint
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Let me try to get this in before the cheers and jeers regarding slabs gets too loud:

 

If I buy a slabbed coin, I have a purpose and I will keep it in the slab to help preserve its grade or value. I am not wealthy enough or advanced enough to buy slabbed coins to liberate them or reslab them for a higher grade.

 

Ok. Now you can commence your debate.

 

But for those who want to hear me out, thank you. Here's the rest of the reason for my post:

c27881832.jpg

http://www.teletrade.com/coins/lot.asp?auc...88&lot=1832

 

That is a coin I would break out of the slab. 1) Peace Dollars are why I became a dedicated coin collector. That is my first series and my most complete one. I'm only missing the key coins - 1934-S being one of them. Just a few years ago, I could have bought an XF 1934-S for ~$75. I never found one that met my price and grade standards.

 

But this one, if I saw it in a store or on the bourse floor, I would snatch it up. 1) $150 is not a bad price at today's levels. 2) It's pretty. 3) It's apparently not cleaned (if you trust TPG to determine/acknowledge that.

 

I would crack it out of its slab. The rest of my peace dollars are unslabbed. It's also not a rare or pristine coin that I would worry about diminishing its value by de-slabbing it.

 

Just wanted to share the first coin that I actually agree with the slab-haters deserves to be released.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If I only could meet that beauty in person... :ninja:

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Let me try to get this in before the cheers and jeers regarding slabs gets too loud:

 

If I buy a slabbed coin, I have a purpose and I will keep it in the slab to help preserve its grade or value. I am not wealthy enough or advanced enough to buy slabbed coins to liberate them or reslab them for a higher grade.

 

Ok. Now you can commence your debate.

 

But for those who want to hear me out, thank you. Here's the rest of the reason for my post:

c27881832.jpg

http://www.teletrade.com/coins/lot.asp?auc...88&lot=1832

 

That is a coin I would break out of the slab. 1) Peace Dollars are why I became a dedicated coin collector. That is my first series and my most complete one. I'm only missing the key coins - 1934-S being one of them. Just a few years ago, I could have bought an XF 1934-S for ~$75. I never found one that met my price and grade standards.

 

But this one, if I saw it in a store or on the bourse floor, I would snatch it up. 1) $150 is not a bad price at today's levels. 2) It's pretty. 3) It's apparently not cleaned (if you trust TPG to determine/acknowledge that.

 

I would crack it out of its slab. The rest of my peace dollars are unslabbed. It's also not a rare or pristine coin that I would worry about diminishing its value by de-slabbing it.

 

Just wanted to share the first coin that I actually agree with the slab-haters deserves to be released.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If I only could meet that beauty in person... :ninja:

 

It's a very nice dollar. I can understand your reasoning and think that given the same circumstances, I'd do the same thing. I like my slabbed coins just the way they are and don't really care if others approve or not. Afterall it is MY collection. I have a few Kennedy half dollars that are slabbed and they're very nice but not overly valuable coins. I've taken to putting silver Kennedy's in my Dansco with the reverse showing to indicate the coin is slabbed and therefore in the safe deposit box.

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I don't like slabs.

 

That said, I have no problem with those who collect slabbed coins, choose to slab a coin, or keep coins in slabs. I have two slabs sitting in my collection even though I have cracked everything else out of their slabs. One is a tiny Calif fractional gold piece, well preserved, extremely rare, often encountered as a cheap fake, and very fragile. Why not keep it in the slab. Its safe and comes with its own assurance that its genuine. The other is a medal that I've not researched yet to make my own attribution. Its fine sitting in the slab until I want to do something else with it.

 

My own thought is that if I had an XF 34-S like yours for a collection as you describe, I would crack it out. If I bought an MS-69 1934-S, drop dead beautiful and pristine, I'd leave it in its slab. But, since I don't really collect modern series, I'll not have that problem.

 

I don't have a problem with collectors who prefer slabs but make their own decisions about the coins inside the slab. I do have a problem with coins being marketed as commodities and people buying the label and number on the slab rather than the coin inside. I'm watching that happen with so-called dollars and trade tokens where the grades don't always make sense. Beside, an EF trade token just doesn't need to be in a slab for any other purpose than try to jack up its sales prices.

 

Nice addition to your collection. Congratulations. Let's revisit this discussion when you buy your 1921 proof to complete your series. I probably wouldn't break that one out of its slab even though I would long to hold it raw.

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Collecting slabbed coins is up to the individual. I've met people that have hundreds of them and really take up a lot of room but if that makes them happy, so be it. A slabbed coin is more expensive, usually, proves the coin is real, not always, gives somebody something to brag about, lots of other things.

For someone just starting out collecting coins, it's OK. For those that just want a pile of plastic around, that's OK also I guess.

For anyone that has been collecting for a long time, most realize mountains of plastic slabs just take up to much room. I've been collecting coins for well over 60 years and have virtually thousands of coins. If they were all slabbed, I would have to purchase a separate house for them.

I met a person once that collected those Hot Wheel Cars. A collector of thoes will tell you for real value they have to be in the original package. This person was in the process of moving and the moving company charged him a massive amount extra. The reason? They had to move numerous heavy boxes of thousands of pounds of those little cars. Remember that for a possible future where you have to move and you have thousands of pounds of plastic around your coins.

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I have to say, I don't like slabbed coins. When any of the various slabbing company's slab a coin it costs money, and they pass that cost on to the collector. The collector has to pass on that cost to the next buyer he sells to. Yes I know the slab is a kind of guarentee of authenticity and grade, and that's fine for those who want that, but for me, I would rather not have that and pay a lower price. I am not against slabbing. It is just a matter of personal preference.

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I've been actively fighting against slabbing for years but i've finally had to jump on the bandwagon i'm afraid. I have many a ten pence piece that frankly the coin cabinet is not adequate means of storage for, not very good for base metal coins, especially in a humid house like mine. They can still develop verdigris, so i'm moving all of my base metal coins to slabs and storing them with those desiccant things to keep the moisture to a minimum. As i'm also buying SLQs (many of which from Ebay) i'm using the slab as the slightly safer bet than to raw alternative.

 

My ancient and hammered coins will remain raw, but i'm considering having to gold slabbed because CGS UK offer a archival photo service, as well as a guarantee of geniune status.

 

So it looks like the worm has turned, so to speak.

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I have my Roosevelt and Jefferson main collections slabbed right now. They fit nicely in boxes designed to protect the slabs and prevent corrosion. The boxes fit nicely into a safe deposit box and so make storage a lot easier.

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I really didn't like coins in a slab and for the longest time and I broke out everyone one I bought. I did this because at that time I kept all my sets in albums and so I wanted these pieces to be in the album also. I also wasn't buying exceedingly rare coins in high grades that cost more then $100. Then a few years ago I got caught up in the registery set thing and I put together 5 sets of coins in slabs in these registery sets. I will still break out a coin if it's not puchased and intended to be in a registery set and if it's not worth more then $100.

 

I will say that things are changing in the coin collecting world that are making buying coins graded and in slabs more attactive and that is the amount of fake coins hitting the market. There are certain coins like trade dollars and others that it's quite possible if you buy these coins raw that you will recieve a fake. There are also modern coin sets like the Esienhower Dollar where on the P&D mint coins the difference in value between a 64,65, and 66 have huge differences in price point between the grades and I really can not judge them well enough myself to make the call between the grades so I let PCGS or NGC make the call for me.

 

I have found that the Eagle binders that hold pages designed for slabs to be a really nice storge system for my sets of coins in slabs.

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