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russia to issue new high denomination


San_Miguel98
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Wow, that made no sense at all!!! I lived in Russia before and trying to find a 1000 ruble banknote was asking for a hell time! (including the money exchanger)

 

There was one time when I had to pay something big in Russian rubles, like over 2000 USD and the retarded money changer had only 100 ruble bills so what I was given was some 60,000+ rubles in 100 ruble bills, so... 6 stacks of 100 x 100 bills and some extra bills. Can you imagine how bad that is? I felt that I was holding onto some German inflation banknotes. Hum, maybe a 5,000 ruble note WILL help, but nevertheless, I don't remember seeing that much 1,000 ruble notes in circulation.

 

Not to forget to mention that if I tried to pay with a 500 rubles note for an item that is just 100 rubles, I usually get haggled by the Russians.

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I can't tell you how many times I had a 100 Ruble note and ended up not buying whatever it was I wanted because they had no change. In the good old days of the USSR stores never usually ordered change, they just had what they got. So they guarded it when they had it, and then when they didn't you got a shrug and no coins so you can't buy comment.

 

I even had this happen with 1 Ruble notes, when they did not have enough coins to make change for a purchase of water etc.

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5000 rubles is like... 180USD, which easily exceeds the highest denomination bill of US, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, England, etc.

 

Most certainly very odd for such a country to release such a paper bill.

 

Nevertheless... wait, I most certainly cannot afford to have such banknote in my collection, afterall having a 1000 ruble banknote was a struggle while I was there :ninja: (nice number though that I have... ab 6666655)

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I can't tell you how many times I had a 100 Ruble note and ended up not buying whatever it was I wanted because they had no change.  In the good old days of the USSR stores never usually ordered change, they just had what they got.  So they guarded it when they had it, and then when they didn't you got a shrug and no coins so you can't buy comment.

 

I even had this happen with 1 Ruble notes, when they did not have enough coins to make change for a purchase of water etc.

 

I guess someone would use a 5,000 Ruble to buy more expensive things (artwork, etc.) from another person, and then the seller would simply put it in the bank?

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I guess someone would use a 5,000 Ruble to buy more expensive things (artwork, etc.) from another person, and then the seller would simply put it in the bank?

 

 

I would never have a 5000 Ruble note in Russia. Anytime you have over $10 in Russian money you are a fool. Any Russian with good sense keeps their big money in Dollars, even as bad as the dollar is now, it is still a lot more stable than the ruble.

 

I have run into situations even in stores where rubles were refused if they thought I had dollars.

 

Same in Ukraine.

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I think the main reason for this is to help people conducting large transactions in cash (which is still very common) to carry less weight. My friend sold his apartment recently and was paid in bricks of USD. Larger denominations will allow people to conduct cash transactions in roubles instead.

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I can't tell you how many times I had a 100 Ruble note and ended up not buying whatever it was I wanted because they had no change.  In the good old days of the USSR stores never usually ordered change, they just had what they got.  So they guarded it when they had it, and then when they didn't you got a shrug and no coins so you can't buy comment.

 

I even had this happen with 1 Ruble notes, when they did not have enough coins to make change for a purchase of water etc.

 

That's suprising.

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The video is interesting, with a bit of a run by of the history of the explorer, Efrei Khabarov, he visited that area Russia during the 17th century. Khabarovsk city was begun in 1858.

 

It is actually a nice city, it is the largest city aside from Vladivostok in the Russian Far East. Curiously when I was there it wasn't as characteristically shabby looking like a lot of then Soviet era cities were.

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