Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

£2 Two pound coin error?


Recommended Posts

I want to bid on a Two pound coin with an error...but is it an error?

The head is on the wrong side...this is clear...but is that classed as an error. Iv'e never seen one with the head on this side.

I won't post a link as i don't want to break any advertising rules...but if you search two pound coin error on UK Ebay...you can see it.

Is it an error? Collectable?

Thanks for any help!

/Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
I want to bid on a Two pound coin with an error...but is it an error?

The head is on the wrong side...this is clear...but is that classed as an error. Iv'e never seen one with the head on this side.

I won't post a link as i don't want to break any advertising rules...but if you search two pound coin error on UK Ebay...you can see it.

Is it an error? Collectable?

Thanks for any help!

/Dave

 

There are two for sale on ebay.uk at the moment. It is my understanding that these coins are struck like a normal coin (except they are in two parts) so by striking the two parts at the same time they are joined together. The only way for a coin to end up with the middle part of one coin and the ring of another is for it to be post mint damage.

 

Personally I don't think either are genuine errors....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, i always check coins as they come into where i work...this is the first time iv'e ever seen this "error". The queens head is not only on the wrong side...but also the wrong angle. Im going to count it as an error as i think it would make a nice little collection piece for my £2 coins. Even if it isn't an error...it's certainly something you don't see.

Link to post
Share on other sites

its hard to say, i dont know much on £2... it seems to late a date for the only possible cause (loose fitting centre pieces) which plauged the early years of this coin. unless the thing rotated while in the acctual minting machine itself, i dont see how it would have totaly flipped, it IS possible for rotation of the dyes, but its unlikly they can flip over like that. unless it fell out and someone shoved it back in of course

the only error £2 i have seen is the no dot 2008 (there is no dot at the bottom of the brass bit on obverse) but so far that is unique, and is a mint error

Link to post
Share on other sites
its hard to say, i dont know much on £2... it seems to late a date for the only possible cause (loose fitting centre pieces) which plauged the early years of this coin. unless the thing rotated while in the acctual minting machine itself, i dont see how it would have totaly flipped, it IS possible for rotation of the dyes, but its unlikly they can flip over like that. unless it fell out and someone shoved it back in of course

the only error £2 i have seen is the no dot 2008 (there is no dot at the bottom of the brass bit on obverse) but so far that is unique, and is a mint error

 

Hmm, it is strange...iv'e checked around the web and can't find a single similar case! I think it must be a very odd mint error. Hopefully wont attract to much attention and i can grab it :ninja:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see one on the referenced site right now using the search terms specified, and I'm 99% certain that it is a genuine coin where someone popped out the middle, then flipped it over and stuck it back in.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I see one on the referenced site right now using the search terms specified, and I'm 99% certain that it is a genuine coin where someone popped out the middle, then flipped it over and stuck it back in.

 

Cheers for the heads up...how possible is that? Without damaging the coin? Il look into it a bit more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Cheers for the heads up...how possible is that? Without damaging the coin? Il look into it a bit more.

 

Well, there are two such pieces listed on ebay right now.

 

Imagine a metal sandwich if you like,

the top piece of metal has the portrait design on,

the middle is composed of a copper-nickel inner, within a nickel-brass ring

the bottom is the design for the other side.

 

The middle of the sandwich is then squashed, leaving an impression of the top and bottom on the middle part of the sandwich, at the same time this compression forces the copper-nickel inner to 'stick' to the nickel-brass ring, so a £2 coin is produced.

 

As this is all one process within the mint, the only way for the copper-nickel part not to match the nickel-brass part is for the coin to have been tampered with after it left the mint. It is therefore not an error, but a fake (allbeit an interesting one!)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Cheers for the heads up...how possible is that? Without damaging the coin? Il look into it a bit more.

 

If you freeze a bimetallic piece, the inner core and outer ring will contract at different rates since they are of different alloys. It should ease in making it easier to pop out the middle.

 

You can hammer a piece of metal a fair bit without leaving marks if done gently, or using a softer material, such as a wooden or hide mallet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1996 when the Canadian $2 coins first came out, people did the same thing. I recall people selling the inner and outer pieces separately, for about $8 each. I had never heard of people putting the inner piece back in with a different orientation though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...