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Henry VIII Groat


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That's a beautiful coin. Can you tell us more about it? When and where it was minted? Composition? General use?

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That's a beautiful coin. Can you tell us more about it? When and where it was minted? Composition? General use?

 

Yes. Go on ccg! :ninja:

 

 

I never knew you owned English hammered! ;)

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That's a beautiful coin. Can you tell us more about it? When and where it was minted? Composition? General use?

 

Thanks! Regretfully, I don't really know anything about it. Would our olde friend from England care to provide some details perhaps?

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Thanks! Regretfully, I don't really know anything about it. Would our olde friend from England care to provide some details perhaps?

 

Firstly - I think it is Henry VIII rather than Henry VII. It's hard to tell from the photograph, but I think it reads VIII rather than VII.

 

See picture below:

 

ccg.jpg

 

 

Even so, the Castle mint mark was never used on the coins of Henry VII.

 

So, it's the First Coinage of Henry VIII, which was from 1509 until 1526. The accession to the throne by Henry VIII was in a time when England was in exceptionally well-off circumstances due to the international trade relations at the time. The treasury was filled to bursting with gold and silver although Henry was to lose it all on his various gallivanting wars across the continent... :ninja:

 

Henry VIII was a lazy man, as his size could indicate ;) , and so he did not pay much attention to the coinage. His First Coinage coins were struck using the same dies as his father's, all he ordered was that an 'I' be added to his father's name. So all of these coins bear the portrait of his father, who was much less rotund than him, and only have the Roman numerals altered. By 1526, the value of silver had depreciated, Henry owed lots of money due to his personal extravagance and the country's coffers were drying up thanks to his ambitious foreign policies.

 

It is of London mint and is an issue which always commands a high price. You have a very nice example with some pleasant toning.

 

How did you acquire this piece?

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Firstly - I think it is Henry VIII rather than Henry VII. It's hard to tell from the photograph, but I think it reads VIII rather than VII.

 

See picture below:

 

ccg.jpg

 

 

Even so, the Castle mint mark was never used on the coins of Henry VII.

 

So, it's the First Coinage of Henry VIII, which was from 1509 until 1526. The accession to the throne by Henry VIII was in a time when England was in exceptionally well-off circumstances due to the international trade relations at the time. The treasury was filled to bursting with gold and silver although Henry was to lose it all on his various gallivanting wars across the continent... :ninja:

 

Henry VIII was a lazy man, as his size could indicate ;) , and so he did not pay much attention to the coinage. His First Coinage coins were struck using the same dies as his father's, all he ordered was that an 'I' be added to his father's name. So all of these coins bear the portrait of his father, who was much less rotund than him, and only have the Roman numerals altered. By 1526, the value of silver had depreciated, Henry owed lots of money due to his personal extravagance and the country's coffers were drying up thanks to his ambitious foreign policies.

 

It is of London mint and is an issue which always commands a high price. You have a very nice example with some pleasant toning.

 

How did you acquire this piece?

Nice work Clive

It maybe worth mentioning that "our enry" debased the silver so much that he was known as copper nose as the copper was evident after a coin had circulated.He was also a nasty chap and full of the Pox...Looking at history the royals have a lot to answer for....most would get ASBO's today.

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Nice work Clive

It maybe worth mentioning that "our enry" debased the silver so much that he was known as copper nose as the copper was evident after a coin had circulated.

 

Well, actually Peter, no debasement took place in the First Coinage because his gallivanting was not quite in full flow :ninja: . The silver debasement took place in 1544 and so we see the commonplace copper noses soon afterwards.

 

The copper nose literally meaning that Henry had a copper nose as the nose was the highest point of the coin and so exhibited the wear first and because the coins had a copper core, when the silver wore off, the copper was clearly visible.

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  • 3 months later...
That is a nice coin!

 

Whats it worth just out of curiosity?

 

It sure is a nice coin. As for its value, I would suggest something like £200. A clear example.

 

 

SJBlencoe's coins often realise vastly inflated prices, so there's no telling. Notice how he describes as "free from chips or cracks, has no clipping" which is not entirely true... :ninja:

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It sure is a nice coin. As for its value, I would suggest something like £200. A clear example.

 

 

 

SJBlencoe's coins often realise vastly inflated prices, so there's no telling. Notice how he describes as "free from chips or cracks, has no clipping" which is not entirely true... :ninja:

 

 

I know exactly what you mean Clive. I've bought a "Great condition Styca" from him and if I'm honest it was terrible and not worth what I paid.

 

Although I'm not bothered I just wanted it to add to my collection.

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