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Are You An Engineer?


hiho

Are You An Engineer?  

23 members have voted

  1. 1. Are You An Engineer?

    • I am (was) an engineer
      9
    • I am not an engineer
      14


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Lately I have noticed that quite a few coin collectors at the coin forums I frequent (NGC, Coin People and Coin Talk) make their living as engineers.

 

Maybe it's because we have a little extra money to indulge in this hobby. Not as much as a doctor, lawyer or investment banker, but a little more than most people. Maybe it's because we appreciate the process of minting a coin. Who knows?

 

Simple poll, either you are an engineer or you are not. Retired engineers count.

 

Please vote! And for the record I am an engineer, 35 years in recording studios and 3 in television.

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Yep. Got my B.S. in Materials Science & Engineering (I prefer to call it Materials Engineering) in 2008 and I'm currently getting an M.S. in Nuclear Engineering.

 

A little thing called the Great Recession has kept me from breaking into the industry but I do have an interview on Monday with one of the big defense contractors for a nuclear materials position!

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Maybe it's because we have a little extra money to indulge in this hobby. Not as much as a doctor, lawyer or investment banker, but a little more than most people. Maybe it's because we appreciate the process of minting a coin. Who knows?

 

I'm a very tactile person. I love the feel and touch of things. Now, I don't molest my coins, but I do appreciate their weight, the coldness, the reeds, the wear, the idea of circulating through history, etc. I collect via series - all dates and mints (and ideally dies) - bbecause of the structure of the challenge. I also appreciate the metals and the minting process. So, yes, the engineer in me is easily interested in this hobby.

 

Otherwise, yes, our incomes do make us suitable for coin collecting but we all crave mental stimulation 24/7. Coins stimulate my brain in many ways.

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I tend to agree with TDP as to what I like about coins, I am very tactile as well. As the angry archeologist once called coin collectors 'Coin Fondlers'...well...he meant it as an insult and likened collecting coins to a fetish. He is partly right of course, while not a fetish, I love the feel of a coin. I love older coins, not newer coins as most newer coins don't 'feel' like the older coins. There are some exceptions of course but on the average modern coins have little substance to them...they are like cheap tokens. This is why I do not care for slabs, they prevent me from holding my coins and as TDP says, I do not molest them but I like the feel of a nice old coin in my hand.

 

I am very interested in the minting process and have attempted minting coins, while they were very basic hammered coins, I am still in the process of figuring out the best way to make a die at home (save from hand etching which I have had little luck with producing a good looking coin).

 

The MAIN reason I collect coins is simply a passion for all things related to coins, the artistry, the history, the mechanics, you name it. What is great about coins is that it combines so many disciplines. Art, History, metallurgy, statistics, chemistry, economics, etc...I simply love coins.

 

As for the money, certainly I can afford coins but in the end, I am also a cheap bastard with obligations that keep me from spending as much as I would like so I try to get the most for the least and look to only spend my coin money on coins, not slabs, not grading, not on a library of reference material. I collect coins not books, grades and slabs.

 

As for Engineers, IMO, you have to be a bit anal, detail oriented and maybe a bit obsessive compulsive. Maybe that is what attracts some of us to coins as such characteristics can be useful in this hobby. Its a simple hobby to me, I do not look to make money from collecting.

 

Good luck on your job hunting Mr. Deadpoint :ninja:

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What Drusus said... :ninja:

 

I am called a senior software engineer. In an industry where people make up titles to suit their sense of humor (one colleague had Software Goddess on her business cards) this title simply means I've outlasted virtually all of my contemporaries and am now the oldest person at my company!

 

Many years ago, before most of this crowd was born, I started out to be a history teacher. Instead I found myself employed programming computers after writing a fence bidding and inventory system for my in-laws. But history remains my primary interest and Napoleonic and French Revolution era history in particular.

 

Unlike Drusus I've spent tons of money over the years acquiring the standard literature. This is usually tough to find, even in limited reprints much less originals. In the past month however I've found and downloaded (mostly through Google Books) the remainder of my wish list as well as the ones I already owned, in searchable pdf format. So, the new mantra is, see if your reference material is available free online, then buy if you must, then the coin. It doesn't flow off the tongue like "Buy the book before the coin"...

 

Hang in there DeadPoint. You'll find a good job soon; then you'll get poached by a headhunter which can be very fun! ;)

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Good thing you started collecting Elverno because you have such great taste in coins and medals, it would be a shame not to have your site...it would honestly be a big loss IMO. See, I think there SHOULD be people who buy the book then the coin...because then I can come here and ask 'anyone have any info on this?' and I get it for free...see? I am one cheap bastard :ninja:

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:ninja:

 

Efficient I'd say. That anal retentive side of me is the classification and cross-referencing that I can't seem to avoid. For me discovering that a piece isn't referenced anywhere is a big thrill.

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I voted no, I was a motor-mechanic, everything from lawn mowers to big rigs & boats. I loved the mechanical & electrical aspects as well welding etc. When computerization came in I took to that as well. I have an extremely analytical mind(love chess, cryptic crosswords etc) and excellent tactile skills(I am so modest too) and found fault finding a thrill.

 

I always loved history, geography & maths, I also enjoy art & design. The historical aspect was what lead me into collecting medals in the first place, but then they seduced me! Like Vern, nothing compares to finding something unlisted, and the harder & deeper the research & the more thought you have to invest in the challenge the greater the reward. The history, geography, maths, art, design & the process of medal production turns all my cranks, or almost all! Mind finding something RRRR listed or not is a great kick. My fetish(Drusus why did you write that word?) is trial strikes, especially showing the design incomplete or different from the finished medal, better yet, no date, no inscription, who is it?

 

TDP "I'm a very tactile person. I love the feel and touch of things. Now, I don't molest my coins, but I do appreciate their weight, the coldness, the reeds, the wear, the idea of circulating through history, etc" TDP I think you protest too much, sounds like molestation to me!

 

"Simple poll, either you are an engineer or you are not" sorry hiho your simple pole & the responses it has generated have pushed a few buttons, time to take my medication & call the therapist, again.

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I was a mechanist and love to carve things and to see things carved in metal thats why I love coin collecting.

 

I'm the one who had to make the crap engineers came up with some of it was good and made since some was bad and made no since at all. :ninja:

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History student here.

 

For me it's always been about the history. Mainly from the societal understanding one can try to derive (types of designs, why certain things/events commemorated), but also from artistic and economic viewpoints as well. (like how bust halves didn't really circulate)

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What Drusus said... ;)

 

I am called a senior software engineer. In an industry where people make up titles to suit their sense of humor (one colleague had Software Goddess on her business cards) this title simply means I've outlasted virtually all of my contemporaries and am now the oldest person at my company!

 

I know that feeling well.

 

I should probably have mentioned that you don't need an engineering degree to call yourself one, at least in my opinion. All of my engineering knowledge came from on the job experience and older engineers willing to answer my rookie questions.

 

Now I am the older engineer being asked "Can I ask you something?"

 

This turned into a pretty good thread, lots of interesting people here...but I knew that already. :ninja:

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I know that feeling well.

 

I should probably have mentioned that you don't need an engineering degree to call yourself one, at least in my opinion. All of my engineering knowledge came from on the job experience and older engineers willing to answer my rookie questions.

 

Now I am the older engineer being asked "Can I ask you something?"

 

This turned into a pretty good thread, lots of interesting people here...but I knew that already. :ninja:

Well, I voted "not an engineer" although I have actually worked professionally for a software development firm between 2000-2004 developing client-server database and desktop applications in various programming and scripting languages (C++, SQL, Oracle PL/SQL, Visual Basic/VBA, i386 assembler). But my primary profession is musician, of all things.

 

I believe that there is something to be said for holding a degree in engineering, even if it is in a related field (i.e. chemical, mechanical, electrical...). There is a certain discipline one needs to be able to do any kind of engineering work, respecting exact specifications, etc. which unfortunately many software developers who haven't studied some kind of engineering just don't have -- at least not when they start out on the job. Of course, I agree 100% that it is possible to acquire this discipline on the job, if you already have the mindset that goes with being an engineer. Professional experience counts just as much as, and sometimes more than a college degree.

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I'm still impressed that a third of the respondents can make a very good claim at being an engineer and even more are in the sciences/tech field.

 

I'm impressed too. We are an impressive bunch here. :ninja:

 

Constanius, I am pretty good with small two cycle engines too, having raced karts for a few years back in the 1980's.

My dad was amazed one day how well his chain saw was suddenly working.

 

After all is said and done it's not really what you do, but how well you do it..... ;)

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