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Dupondius of Trajan


NumisMattic2200
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Can anyone identify the type of this dupondius of Trajan - I cannot quite sem to match it with anything in Wildwinds..the reverse is odd. Also, obverse seems to read something like, "IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM..." strange?.. I've been trying to ID it for ages :ninja:

 

29y5l6s.jpg

 

24vr679.jpg

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There's no radiate crown; it's an copper as.

 

Van Meter 68 / Cohen 470

c. 103-111 A.D.

 

Reverse:

SPQR OPTIMO PRINCIPI / SC

Annona standing right (though your piece looks like left?), holding corn ears and cornucopiae, modius and plow flanking to left and right, respectively.

 

Obverse:

IMP CAES NERVAE TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P COS V PP

Laureate bust right.

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Sweet, and thanks for the info - do you happen to know any sites other than WW that are good for ID-ing coins?

 

Not that I'm aware of at least for earlier stuff anyways.

 

If you're looking to buy just one book, Van Meter (I paid US$40 for my copy a few years ago) covers most common types, though doesn't go into valuation. Then again, valuing Roman coins is something that you get a feel for once you get into it.

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The idea of the radiate crown indicating dupondii is a guide but not something that holds in every case. In theory, the dupondius (and sestertius) were struck in yellow brass (orichalcum) while the as was in red copper. This is pretty 'sacred' in the first century but the alloys start to become less distinct after that so by the 3rd century, you need a crown to tell. Vespasian issued some dupondii in yellow brass but with laurel wreath at half the weight of sestertii. His copper asses can be larger in diameter. Patina makes the distinction today harder to see than it was when these things were shiny and new. At 10.7g, what would you call the coin below? Sestertii of the same period weigh over 20g.

120240565.jpg

 

The major catalogs still differ in opinion as to what denomination some coins are. This is particularly the case when the 'head' is a woman since they never wore radiate crowns. There is little problem in the first century but by the time of later coins of Julia Domna the alloys are similar looking and the mint invented the crescent device to distinguish the brass coins.

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The idea of the radiate crown indicating dupondii is a guide but not something that holds in every case. In theory, the dupondius (and sestertius) were struck in yellow brass (orichalcum) while the as was in red copper. This is pretty 'sacred' in the first century but the alloys start to become less distinct after that so by the 3rd century, you need a crown to tell. Vespasian issued some dupondii in yellow brass but with laurel wreath at half the weight of sestertii. His copper asses can be larger in diameter. Patina makes the distinction today harder to see than it was when these things were shiny and new. At 10.7g, what would you call the coin below? Sestertii of the same period weigh over 20g.

120240565.jpg

 

The major catalogs still differ in opinion as to what denomination some coins are. This is particularly the case when the 'head' is a woman since they never wore radiate crowns. There is little problem in the first century but by the time of later coins of Julia Domna the alloys are similar looking and the mint invented the crescent device to distinguish the brass coins.

 

Right - totally forgot about the alloys!

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