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Well something struck me the other day, no it wasn't a bus, it was a pang of... inspiration?

 

When looking through Jay's starter collection, there he is just starting out in the world of numismatics, well I had dejavu of how my own collection started and this got me thinking about the coins I had that meant something to me. Something special, not because they're the prettiest or the biggest nor the most expensive but coins that for some reason I had a sentimental attachment to and no matter how many times my collection's lineup has been changed, swapped, moved, been axed, reincarnated... they've managed to last the course.

 

Well very few of my original coins have made it through to modern times, nearly all my none British coins went to someone on this forum (except for a few Spanish coins, a 1944 Washer quarter and a '53 Flanklin that I held onto). Most of the British were traded out over the years until only a handful of farthings and some decimal halfpennies are all that remain. But from many of the low grade and fairly nondescript coins that have survived there is one more than most, one coin that was special to me as a child when I started, mostly because it was the biggest and more importantly for many years the oldest coin I had.

 

I give you this;

 

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A George III 1807 Penny, not the prettiest, nor the most detailed survivor of its type but to me this coin is as special now as it was all those years ago.

 

 

How about you guys and gals, what's your most sentimental coin and why?

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Don't have it imaged, but I have an 1867 USA 2 cent piece that my grandfather gave me when I was ten and he was about 85 years old. He had lost his pinky finger in a corn shucking machine accident in 1897, when he returned from town after the accident his older brother gave him the coin to take back into town to buy candy with. Instead he saved the coin, and gave it to me nearly 80+ years later.

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Don't have it imaged, but I have an 1867 USA 2 cent piece that my grandfather gave me when I was ten and he was about 85 years old. He had lost his pinky finger in a corn shucking machine accident in 1897, when he returned from town after the accident his older brother gave him the coin to take back into town to buy candy with. Instead he saved the coin, and gave it to me nearly 80+ years later.

Wow, what a story! :ninja: Thanks for sharing it.

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Good stories!

 

My sentimental "coins" tend to be my various military "challenge" coins I got flying over the years in various squadrons, countries, wars, etc.

 

The only real coin that still has a story for me is a 75 proof set my grandmother got me, which really got me into coin collecting to begin with.

 

Ciao,

AWACS

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I have some other coins in a coin purse, they are mostly Indian cents, SL Dimes, and Liberty nickels that were my Great Great Grandfathers change in his coin purse from when he died in 1918. There are no rare coins in there, but there are a couple of dimes dated in the 1840's or 1850's - the rest are 1870's or 1880's.

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When my father passed away in 1990 I inherited his coin collection as was his wish.

 

The highlight was an uncirculated 1924 St Gaudens $20 gold piece. My dad collected old US silver coins but he had splurged on the St. Gaudens as a once in a lifetime purchase. He was VERY proud of it.

 

I eventually sent it to PCGS to be certified and it was returned as "cleaned". That was quite depressing as I was 100% sure it was not cleaned. I put it into a random jacket pocket in my closet and intended to put it into my safe deposit box first chance I got. Then I forgot all about it.

 

About a month later my son needed a jacket and grabbed one from my closet. He returned from school and left it on the floor of my bedroom. I saw the jacket on the floor and remembered the St. Gaudens. I said to myself "Oh, no..." as I thought it may have been lost.

 

But sure enough there it was still in the jacket pocket. This time I sent it to NGC and it came back MS62.

 

I have hundreds of coins but this one means the most to me. And now you know why I use NGC instead of PCGS. Once bitten, twice shy... :ninja:

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Way, way back when I was a little kid my Dad came home one day with a bright, shinny, Silver colored pennie. They just came out and everyone was talking about them since they were made of Steel, not Copper. My Dad gave me that one and almost every day handed me more of them. By the end of that year, 1943, I had accumulated almost 30 rolls of those and still have them today.

Now every time I see one anywhere I just have to have more of them and have accumulated well over 3,000 of them. All thanks to my Dad.

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I've got a few. Peace dollars one from my grandparents each side, one from wife's father, one from my wife's step father. Two liberty nickels One from my grandparent's and one from my wife's father. And last but not least a 1896 s half dollar from my grandparents. Thing whats a shame on this one is a big x scratched across the face and a gouge on the neck.

 

908282.jpg

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I've got a handful, most of which are not imaged. Some of the most notable ones:

 

A '47-S Jefferson nickel that revived my love for coins. I noticed it while I was sorting through my till at the end of the day on account of its horrid condition. I took a closer look at it, noticed the date, and made change for a dollar so I could keep it. I was so scared I'd get fired for messing with my drawer! After that little encounter, I started paying closer attention to my coins, and started finding neat little oddities everywhere, so I decided to start formally collecting them. A year later, I had all 104 '59-'08 penny business strikes, most of the '38-'63 nickel set, and a handful of wheaties, foreign coins, and silver dimes to boot.

 

A '44 wheatie my grandfather gave me. For the longest time, it was the oldest coin I had in my collection. I don't know whether or not it was intentional, or just crazy luck, but it has a gouge on the mouth that gives Lincoln a huge smile. I thought it was the coolest thing ever when I was a kid.

 

A '95-P grease strike quarter a former girlfriend of mine gave me. We became friends through work, and she was drawn to me because I had a "cute passion" about coins. When we started dating, she started looking into it for herself, and eventually became passionate about it herself. One day when I came over to her house, she handed me a couple wheat pennies and the mis-struck quarter she found in her change jar. She was fascinated by a small collection of nickels I gave her as a present, and eventually I started bringing over rolls of nickels to search through together. So far, she's the only person I was able to drag down with me.

 

And finally, a few that I do not currently have, but are in the family's posession... Back in the 50's my grandfather was drafted into a couple months of service in Korea, and kept a couple 10 cent pay certificates as a souvenir, since he didn't think he'd need a couple dimes anytime soon. He put them straight into a protective box, and has kept them in pristine condition for more than 50 years. After his service ended, he travelled the world with the navy, and kept a number of coins from all different nations, as well as a number of other items (including a Japanese Katana and WW-II era sniper rifle which were unfortunately stolen by a moving van crew...). Most of them have spent the past 40-50 years in a wooden "treasure" box his father hand-carved and painted in the 1930's.

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  • 1 month later...

My dad was a poor man who I saw only on weekends. Whenever he would get a half dollar of silver dollar, he would give them to me. I was young, and spent them, but was always fascinated with the size and feel of them, and to this day, I find it hard to pass up a Benjamin, Kennedy, or Ike. They make me tear up a bit...

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My grandfather gave my mother an 1849 US gold dollar after I was born (1950) as a present for me. She kept it in her jewelry box in an envelope that had my birth announcement in it. I used to pull it out and look at it when younger, but she never "let" me keep it myself. When I started collecting coins at 12 years old, she gave it to me for my collection. I gave it to my daughter a couple of years ago as her college graduation present. The envelop is long gone, now its in a Capital Plastics holder. With a little luck, it will fertilize her collecting interests and eventually spark the interest of her children.

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I was buying American coins kind of aimlessly 10 years ago or so when I came across an odd coin that I couldn't figure out. It had some curious symbols on one side --a sun bracketed by wings, with the word FIRMABO across it-- and around the reverse it said CHILIANUS COQUUS NORIBERGENSIS 87. I knew the reference was to Nuremberg, but I just couldn't believe my coin store guy who insisted that the "87" referred to 1587 and that this coin --it was/is in good shape-- could possibly be that old.

 

It was my first jeton, by the Muntzmeister Kilian Koch of Nuremberg, and yes from 1587, and the FIRMABO refers to a Bible verse (all of this took a good deal of research, which was lots of fun), and as a result I went crazy into French and German jetons. I've had to sell off a bunch of my collection, but I'll never part with this one. It meant nothing to me for the longest time until I figured it out, and then it meant everything.

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After reading this post and sticking in my 2 cents, I thought it would be interesting to count all my 1943 Steel Cents. So I did. Then made a new Excel spread sheet for that info. A little dissapointed though due to the total was only 2,650 and not the over 3,000 I mentioned previously. I made a real effort to do it right this time since many of them were in rolls for over 60 years. I now have them separated by Uncirc in plastic rolls, AU's in plastic rolls, special commemorative sets put together by someone with all 3 mints in Unc., special ones in 2x2's such as error coins. This was a real time consuming effort since I continuously remembered other places where I had them. Such as one in a 20th Century Type set.

Just thought I say all this since I spent so much time doing it.

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After reading this post and sticking in my 2 cents, I thought it would be interesting to count all my 1943 Steel Cents. So I did. Then made a new Excel spread sheet for that info. A little dissapointed though due to the total was only 2,650 and not the over 3,000 I mentioned previously. I made a real effort to do it right this time since many of them were in rolls for over 60 years. I now have them separated by Uncirc in plastic rolls, AU's in plastic rolls, special commemorative sets put together by someone with all 3 mints in Unc., special ones in 2x2's such as error coins. This was a real time consuming effort since I continuously remembered other places where I had them. Such as one in a 20th Century Type set.

Just thought I say all this since I spent so much time doing it.

 

Impressive and congratulations, carl. Any chance you could post some images of the especially nice steelies?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I guess for me it would have to be this one

 

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which is also in the same pack at this

 

913783A.jpg

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The reason being my Papa brought back these packs when he was in Jersey to commemorate the occasion. He was part of the liberating force which was sent there which is where he met my Gran.

 

Most of the packs had banknotes numbered in the 3000s but this one is numbered 112 which leads me to believe he may have gifted this pack.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've got two, for very different reasons:

 

1966 Canadian dollar.

908721.jpg

 

I received this from an eccentric uncle the first and only time I ever met him. He was under the impression that it was a valuable variant. There *was* one in 1966 but I'm about 99% certain this isn't one of those pieces. He had been walking on water a few minutes before I met him. I was in the company of another uncle, his younger brother, who warned me that Glenn was "a little odd". If you knew Brian you'd understand why I was immediately on guard. A local cafe directed us to the lake and told us to look for the guy walking on water. Sure enough my uncle came skimming across the lake on what looked like a pair of seaplane pontoons strapped to his feet. He had poles with tiny pontoon-like things on the ends that he used to keep himself upright. Brian and he hadn't seen each other in twenty years and while they were speaking he waved me over pulled this dollar from his pocket and after admonishing me never to spend it told me to get the hell out of here, adults were talking. Uncle Glenn I hardly knew ya but I never spent the coin. That was in 1966 BTW.

 

And the second:

 

1807 2/3 Taler, Brunswick-Luneburg.

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The coin that rekindled my interest in collecting. I had arrived home a few months before buying this coin proudly showing my wife my first Napoleonic era sword in what I hoped to become a huge collection. After pointing out that at the time we lived in a tiny apartment with two children under the age of 2 and that large, pointy things were not welcome she said the fateful words; "so, have you got the criteria? Small, blunt, easily stored. Not sharp, long and potentially lethal". Of course she was actually nicer than that but I'm telling the story...

 

I had to take a trip to Hawaii and while waiting to come back home I had 12 hours to kill. I ended up in a mall and there, in a coin store, was this small, blunt and easily stored Napoleonic era item. Ha!

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The coin that has that kind of value to me, and the coin I will never get rid of, is a 1913 1 Rouble (the Romanov Rouble, 1613-1913)... My grandfather gave it to me when I was 11. The coin was originally given to him by HIS grandfather (my great, great, great grandfather). At one point in my grandpa's life, he actually gave it as a gift to a friend, but that friend returned it decades later and ended up in my hands later. And one day I'll pass it on to one of my kids/grandkids...

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My 97 year old Great Grandmother gave me this when I was about 10. It was corroded (the corrosion has been removed to prevent further damage) and the oldest coin in my collection for quite some time. Earlier this year my Great Grandmother passed away leaving this coin as the only thing she had ever given to me besides a Christmas card. It is my little treasure and one of my most important coins in my collection.

 

2rw7soy.jpg

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