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Foreign people on banknotes?


Dave

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Ok – this is just a fanciful thinking post here - nothing serious at all. But as I was viewing some banknotes something made me think of all the countries that actually had banknotes with portraits on them of people who were not from that country. Some were people who’ve had similar religious ties to them, such as Einstein on an Israel note, others had once been from that country like Alexander Graham Bell who appeared on a Scottish Banknote. In fact, Scotland also had Jack Nicklaus appear on one of their commemorative notes as well. Others were simply adored by someone in that countries government, like the Yugoslavian President Joseph Broz Tito who appeared on a Guinea banknote.

 

Not that it would ever happen, but if you were given the opportunity to place a foreign person’s portrait on a banknote for your country, whom would you choose? There are many people who would be eligible for the US in my mind. Keeping the idea that they should be someone who had an impact on our countries development, I can think of Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi , the sculptor of the Statue of Liberty, which is a one of the worlds most recognizable statues whose image makes one think immediately of the United States and the freedom and values it represents.

 

Is there anyone else who can think of a foreign person who could ‘possibly’ be thought of as a candidate for having their portrait placed onto a banknote?

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The only group that comes immediately to my mind is Nobel Prize winners. Whether the peace prize, or for scientific endeavors, I think of these folks as truly extending their influence beyond any one country. I don't have specific names for your proposal, but am just suggesting them as a category of folks that I wouldn't mind seeing on USA money whether they're American or not.

 

Dave

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The only group that comes immediately to my mind is Nobel Prize winners. Whether the peace prize, or for scientific endeavors, I think of these folks as truly extending their influence beyond any one country. I don't have specific names for your proposal, but am just suggesting them as a category of folks that I wouldn't mind seeing on USA money whether they're American or not.

 

Dave

 

America has an infatuation with Einstein. He would be one of the first people on there. You could argue he'd be one of the last because of his association with the atomic bomb. I think it would become very political if we actually honored a non-American. Who could represent every single political stance that the powers in charge have?

 

Andrew Carnegie - another Scot - is the first person that came to mind that I could see.

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Gallatin, Albert (1761-1849). Born in Geneva, Switzerland, he came to America in 1780. He was elected to the Senate in 1793 and served as secretary of the treasury under Jefferson (1801-1814), and later as U.S. minister to France and Great Britain.

 

$500 1862, 1863 United States (legal tender) note

 

Hamilton, Alexander (1754-1804), first secretary of the treasury. Born on island of Nevis, Leeward Islands, he studied at King's College (now Columbia University). He served through the Revolution as secretary and aide-de-camp to Washington. A member of the Continental Congress, he was secretary of the treasury from 1789 to 1795. He was instrumental in defeating Aaron Burr for the presidency in 1801, later was killed by Burr in a duel. He planned and initiated policies establishing the national fiscal system.

 

$2 1862 legal tender note

$5 1861 demand note

$5 1862, 1863 legal tender

$10 1933 and all later series silver certificates

$10 1929 Federal Reserve Bank notes$10 1928 and all later series Federal Reserve notes

$10 1929 national bank notes

$10 1928, 1928A gold certificates

$20 1869, 1875, 1878, 1880 legal tender notes

$50 1862 legal tender notes

$50 1863 6 percent compound interest treasury note

$50 5 percent interest-bearing note

$500 1861 7.3 percent three-year interest-bearing note

$1,000 1863, 1870, 1871, 1875, 1882, 1907, 1922 gold certificates

$1,000 1918 Federal Reserve note

 

Morris, Robert (1734-1806). Born in England, he came to America in 1747 and favored the Colonial cause in the Revolution. He was a member of the Continental Congress and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He served as superintendent of finance (1781-1784), founded and organized the Bank of North America (1782) and was a delegate to the Constitutional convention in 1787. He served in the Senate from 1789 to 1795.

 

$10 1878, 1880 silver certificates

$1,000 1862, 1863 United States (legal tender) notes

$1,000 Bank of U.S. note (lower right corner)

$10 Northampton Bank, Pa.

 

Raleigh, Sir Walter (1552?-1618). A favorite of Queen Elizabeth, he was granted a patent to send an expedition exploring the American coast from Florida to North Carolina in 1584 and named the coast north of Florida "Virginia." He sent settlers to occupy Roanoke Island, N.C., in 1585, but the colony failed. With the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603, he fell out of favor with the English court and was eventually beheaded at Whitehall.

 

$2 original and 1875 "Lazy Deuce" First Charter national bank note (on the reverse, Sir Walter Raleigh in England, 1585, exhibiting corn and smoking tobacco from America)

 

Just a few, these do not include anyone born within what would become the USA before the founding.

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