Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Other tokens I recently received...


Recommended Posts

A few more fascinating-looking little metal gems for us to enjoy. As usual, could do with any information anyone knows?..

 

Prosit Neu Jahr - German New Year's token...anyone know who this might have been given to and in what context?..

 

jt1bgl.jpg

 

ame6gk.jpg

 

Queen Victoria and King Louis Philippe on a brass token of some kind dated 1846?..(jeton?..)

 

15glcn.jpg

 

2mqs0oi.jpg

 

St. Paul's Cathedral token

 

213m7et.jpg

 

2eyz5nr.jpg

 

This one is similar to one I uploaded a few weeks/couple of months ago, showing the heads of the Royal family - Queen Victoria, the future Edward VII, younger George V and the infant which is probably the young Edward VIII. I'm slightly annoyed at my photograph, though it's not easy snapping the copper coins.

 

23svepd.jpg

 

2wfl182.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a similar token for the German new years:

 

prosit01.jpg

 

prosit01p.jpg

 

prosit01p2.jpg

 

Obverse: Chimney Sweep with Ladder and Clover riding a pig / Prosit Neujahr

 

Reverse: Horseshoe with text / gluck und segen du sollst mich hegen und pflegen ich bringe dir

 

Quick explination of what this is: There is a long tradition in Austria, Germany and other European nations to mint tokens and print cards for the new years...after some time it started to become light hearted and the image of a chimney-sweep with a pig developed as well as the imagry of a four leaf clover and a horseshoe which all mean good luck. This token is wishing you a happy new years and good luck.

 

There are a wide variety of these minted since the early 30's when the mint in Viena started minting Prosit Neujahr coins. Vienna mint issued a series of 23mm copper pieces up to 1938; these with only one main design, the reverse being either a repeat of the obverse, a date, blank, or an advertisement. Right from these early days they were used as commercial promotion pieces, which is now probably their main use.

 

From 1948 a choice of metal finishes were available; aluminium for a few years only, bronze and, predominantly for quite a while, brass. By the 1960s plated pieces were being produced as well, to create the impression of a bright silver or gold finish. It is certainly possible to find some years' pieces in several different forms.

 

Certain symbols repeat themselves, not all used on every piece: the lucky cat, the horseshoe, the four leaf-clover and the pig. The sweep, always has a ladder and is either walking, carrying the pig...or in this case, riding it. It is thought to bring good luck when you invite a chimney sweeper into your home at New year and also for Brides to see a sweep before a wedding. The other symbols are self explainitory.

 

These have now been minted by many different groups and companies, with every imaginable combo of the imagry or Sweep, pig, horseshoe and clover, as promo peices and are still minted today.

 

I just happened along this token at a show so I know very little about them save what I have read from a few sites that discuss them. Its hard to pass up a man riding a pig!! the link below is a guy who seems to have quite a few but I dont think mine is listed there. Its a shame that its corroded on the back, I have a feeling it might be difficult to find another example like this as it seems a little less common, nor do I know how to treat the problem...I assume this is plated brass.

 

http://www.austriancoins.com/tokensmint-1.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...