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Die Sinkers and Mint Store Cards


bill
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I have expanded my interests from coin dealer medals and store cards to the store cards and advertising tokens of die sinkers and mints. The first is closely related to my current collecting interests in early California souvenirs,

 

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Moise struck the California state seal medals of interest to me along with a wide variety of trade tokens and telephone tokens. Moise first worked for Klinkner, then competed with his hiers, and later bought and merged the two businesses. The business continues today as Patrick Company (Patco), a stationary company in San Francisco. The store card pictured here is one of many issued between the 1890s and 1920s.

 

I've also attached and earlier state seal store card pictured in the separate thread.

 

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Schwaab Stamp and Seal produced a large number of souvenir medals and badges in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The business remains in the Schwaab family to this day. Their own short history can be found on the company's website.

 

The piece pictured here is interesting for its design as a stamped seal. The swastika on the reverse dates to the period when it was still a good luck sign before it became the symbol for the Nazis in Germany.

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The Patrick Mint in Santa Rosa, California has been in business since 1957. They produce a large number of personal and dealer tokens for the bicentennial in 1976. Their website shows many of the pieces they have produced and their stock dies such as the one pictured here.

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  • 1 month later...

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LA Rubber Stamp appears on many tokens and so-called dollars from California, especially southern California. The company was founded in the 1880s and started striking its own tokens and medals about 1891.

 

Aluminum, 38 mm

Kappen LA 681

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An aluminum store card from the Chipron Stamp Co. in Los Angeles, California. A rare item from about 1930. The company was founded in 1892 and sold to the LA Rubber Stamp Co. in 1942.

 

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  • 6 months later...

C.A. Klinkner, 1892 in San Francisco. Klinkner issued a number of different tokens. The one pictured here is an early aluminum token.

 

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Another Klinkner store card. I've bid on several (not this one) and lost. I paid more for the one pictured here, but it is rare given that it is a pictoral with Klinkner's image.

 

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That's the Caper! Klinkner was known for his marketing flair and I can only assume that is what the slogan refers to. It could also refer to the fact that he was arrested for counterfeiting because he produced a 5¢ token that worked in nickel machines at the time. Bars complained and the FBI reacted. The token itself bore no resemblance to a nickel and was produced to put into his own stencil purchase machines. But, it also worked in other nickel devices.

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Neat stuff!

 

Speaking of 5c - one problem in Canada was that the Canadian silver 5c was not compatable with American made vending machines that were made to accept nickels, so tokens were commonly used, though some would go through the efforts to import US nickels.

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Another Los Angeles Rubber Stamp store card commemorating the 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial celebrated in Los Angeles.

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I love the early pictorals from San Francisco, especially this one from J.C. Irvine. Irvine later bought Wirth and Jachens.

 

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Another Klinkner store card. I've bid on several (not this one) and lost. I paid more for the one pictured here, but it is rare given that it is a pictoral with Klinkner's image.

 

986008.jpg

 

That's the Caper! Klinkner was known for his marketing flair and I can only assume that is what the slogan refers to. It could also refer to the fact that he was arrested for counterfeiting because he produced a 5¢ token that worked in nickel machines at the time. Bars complained and the FBI reacted. The token itself bore no resemblance to a nickel and was produced to put into his own stencil purchase machines. But, it also worked in other nickel devices.

 

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That's the proper caper / by R. Steirly.

CREATED/PUBLISHED

New York: Harding, E. H., 1874.

 

Whilst reading back through this topic, did some browsing and came across this.

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First verse:

 

I am a man of easy mind.

I know no care or woe.

I make myself agreeable, Where ever I may go.

My friends I count them by the score.

And the reason I will tell.

I always do things properly, And consequently well.

 

That's the proper caper!

 

And some definitions:

1. a playful skip or leap

2. a high-spirited escapade

3. cut a caper , cut capers a. to skip or jump playfully b. to act or behave playfully; frolic

4. slang a crime, esp an organized robbery

5. informal ( Austral ) a job or occupation

6. informal ( Austral ) a person's behaviour

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That is some collection you have Bill. Very interesting.

 

What I love about this particular forum is the diversity, yet commonality of collecting interests, and the incredible knowledge base of the contributors concerned. It's always a learning experience. Thanks for sharing.

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