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Coins you like but could not be slabbed


Mark Stilson
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Pretty much what the title says. Post ones you could not get slabbed unless as genuine or in some kind of slab that denotes problems. But not in a normal reputable tpg graded slab.

 

To start out my favorite "problem" coin

1855 slanted 5 large cent. A square nail hole in it some one probably hung it in their house as a good luck charm. But later seems to been put back in circulation and allowed to get a nice skin over.

 

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Next a 1675 Germany Brunswick-Wolfenbuttel 12 mariengroschen (1/3 Thaler) Rudolf August wild man grasping stick KM 504 Somebody needed to make change. With an old cut on edge.

 

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Another square nail hole. W.D. Keuper was one of the early settlers of Schulenburg Texas. This one was kind of strange. I spotted the brother to this coin on line in Richard's Token Catalog with a similar square nail hole on a 50 cent piece.

 

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Another Texas token. This one has a bend in it on the right lower side. The history behind these to me is really interesting. B.M. Co Bonus Texas. Bonus was a company town built and operated by William Thomas Eldridge and W. L. Dunovant. People would move in to company houses, work for the company, pay the rent and get tokens to use at the company store as payment. The people behind the town had a very colorful life. In August of 1902 Eldridge had a parting of ways with Dunovant which resulted in Eldridge shooting and killing Dunovant as he boarded the San Antonio & Aransas Pass "Davy Crockett" passenger train at Simonton. W. E. Calhoun the brother-in-law of W. L. Dunovant shot and nearly killed Eldridge but the case was dropped since no witnesses could be found. Eldridge in the case against him for shooting Dunovant later plead self defense and the case was dismissed. Later in May of 1905 Eldridge was on the same train the San Antonio & Aransas Pass train "Davy Crockett Eldridge and spotted W. E. Calhoun who he promptly shot 4 times and killed. Eldridge was acquitted after pleading self defense. Later he Partnered with the Kempner family of Galveston and started Imperial Sugar in Sugar Land Texas. There is a lot more to be read on this. But way to long for a post.

 

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Most Bonus Texas tokens are found as metal detector finds.

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For different reasons from the ones you listed, I would never slab these two - two of my first collectible coins given to me by my father as part of his father's great but dismantled collection.

 

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I don't want to encapsulate them because it would remove the familiar aspect. I like holding the coins knowing my father and grandfather did too. Several others would be spared from slabbing for the same reason.

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I, personally, could not get any of my coins slabbed as it defeats the object of money. Coins are specifically meant to be handled and most of mine have been without a slab for nearly one thousand years and so I would not seal their fate in a plastic coffin.

 

If I were to collect later milleds and proofs I could perfectly understand.

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For different reasons from the ones you listed, I would never slab these two - two of my first collectible coins given to me by my father as part of his father's great but dismantled collection.

 

 

I don't want to encapsulate them because it would remove the familiar aspect. I like holding the coins knowing my father and grandfather did too. Several others would be spared from slabbing for the same reason.

 

I have some like that. From my grandparents thru my parents. Also from my wifes parents and grandparents. I have about 10 like that. This is from my Grandfather on my fathers side. It could not be slabbed even if I wanted but its kept in a separate box with the others marked in a flip who it came from.

 

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I, personally, could not get any of my coins slabbed as it defeats the object of money. Coins are specifically meant to be handled and most of mine have been without a slab for nearly one thousand years and so I would not seal their fate in a plastic coffin.

 

If I were to collect later milleds and proofs I could perfectly understand.

 

 

I recently got some bulk silver dollars. It was nice handling them with out thinking "Am I leaving finger prints? " Or could a scuff knock it down a grade?

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