Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Recommended Posts

Got another coronation medallion a few days ago and while it is much smaller then I expected :ninja:, this brings a total of them to 4 and may be worth posting. Also unlike coins I do not have a good reference and suggestions and infromation about these coronation medals are welcome.

 

Here is s small (about florin size) Victoria jubilee medal

 

949695.jpg

 

1902 Edward VII and Alexandra coronation medal

 

963703.jpg

 

1911 George V and Mary

 

949697.jpg

 

1937 George VI and Elizabeth (Queen Mother), 1 & 1/4" (32 mm) diameter, 15.3 gr weight

 

950295.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

 

your "1937 George VI and Elizabeth" - coronation medal looks like the (smaller?) silver version.

 

I got this bronze version:

 

tok010.jpg

 

King George VI Coronation Bronze Medal, by P. Metcalf, 1937 AD., the official medallion, struck by the Royal Mint.

Æ (32 mm / 15,76 g), plain edge,

Obv.: GEORGE VI CROWNED 12 MAY 1937 / P M , profile portrait of George VI facing left.

Rev.: QUEEN ELIZABETH 12 MAY 1937 / P M , Queen Elizabeth (Lady Elizabeth Bowes Lyon later to be known as the Queen Mother), facing left.

.

 

Some info from the web:

 

A number of medals and medallions were issued, by a number of different issuing houses, for the Coronation of King George VI in 1937. The medallion featured is one of the Official medallions, struck by the Royal Mint.

The medals were engraved by P. Metcalf, in high relief.

The silver and gold medals were issued in two sizes, the bronze medals were only issued in the smaller size.

 

So far i found no info about the actual sizes and weights of the silver versions. If you can provide your data we have 50%.

 

regards

Link to post
Share on other sites
Some info from the web:

 

A number of medals and medallions were issued, by a number of different issuing houses, for the Coronation of King George VI in 1937. The medallion featured is one of the Official medallions, struck by the Royal Mint.

The medals were engraved by P. Metcalf, in high relief.

The silver and gold medals were issued in two sizes, the bronze medals were only issued in the smaller size.

 

So far i found no info about the actual sizes and weights of the silver versions. If you can provide your data we have 50%.

 

regards

 

I added weight and size above the best I could measure. Indeed, this 37 medal is what is called "official" issue by the Royal Mint and I have seen larger medals as well albeit substantially more expensive, in the $100 range or more.

 

I'll also rescan this one to show real luster it has.

Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_1651_edited.jpg

IMG_1652_edited.jpg

IMG_1670_edited.jpg

 

 

1685, England. OFFICIAL CORONATION MEDAL OF JAMES II. By John Roettiers. Silver 35mm.

Obv: Laureate bust of James II, right. Leg: IACOBVS . II . D. G. ANG . SCO . FR . ET . HIB. REX. (James II by the grace of God king of England, Scotland, France and Ireland) R below the bust, the R is actually a monogram of J. R.

Rev: A hand holding a crown above a wreath on a cushion. Leg: A . MILITATI . AD . REGIAM.=From the military to the royal crown. Exergue: INAVGVRAT . 23. AP . 1685. Mintage of just 800.

 

Reverse the initials GHF crudely scratched in the field. At least the engraved details are unaffected and the medal is still very attractive. When the initials were scratched is not known, but it could have been during the 'Glorious Revolution' (obviously James was hated by many at that time) or 'yesterday'. Owing to the extremely high value of these medals now, I suspect an early date for the defacement.

 

This was the official medal distributed among the spectators at the coronation of James II on 23rd April, 1685. The dies are in the British Museum. Prior to his coronation, James had distinguished himself as a naval and military commander. The medal was executed by John Roettier, who was the eldest son of an Antwerp goldsmith. Roettier came to England soon after the Restoration and was appointed one of the engravers at the Mint and Chief Engraver on the death of Thomas Rawlins (1670). He held this position until 1697. Apart from the major pieces made by the Simons, Roettier's medals are the finest produced in England since the Restoration.

Link to post
Share on other sites

951207.jpg

951206.jpg

2 examples Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee 1837-1897. Bronze 56mm by Geo. Will. De Saulles (after W.Wyon) & Thomas Brock.

949853.jpg

Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee Medal 1837-1897. by Geo. Will. De Saulles (after W.Wyon) & Thomas Brock. Silver 26mm

951201.jpg

Edward VII & Queen Alexandra Coronation Medal 9th Aug. 1902. Bronze 56mm by G.W. de Saulles

Link to post
Share on other sites

med01.jpg

 

Edward VIII, Proposed Coronation, 1937, a lead medal, unsigned, 44mm, 1936 AD.,

Lead Medal (44 mm / 46,14 g),

Obv.: HIS MAJESTY KING EDWARD VIII , crowned bust of Edward right within the legend in a raised border.

Rev.: CROWNED - A. D. 1937 , Britannia standing frontal, holding crown within an arch [portico], before the Thames River scene, with St Pauls and battleship in the distance, legend on either side of design. Signe 'British' in at the base of the column to the right.

WE 6820 A2 ; BHM 4308 AE ; TE 256/7 ; F 387.4 .

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like South African coins and thus came into this Colony of Natal 1902 Coronation medal; not sure if it is silver or alloy, medal is 29-30 mm in diameter and 11.6 gr weight; Nice, I would say extra fine; do not know if the hole was planned from the beginning or punched later on. I know i posted it earlier under the Commonwealth sub-section but I think it is appropriate here as well. And will add a couple more commemorative medals I should get shortly.

 

950151.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

Going through my small coin collection I have found my Coronation of King George medallion. I have a suspicion that it is the sliver version. The diameter is 55mm and the weight is 90g. Please see the attached picture to see the condition. Any ideas as to the value of this coin?

GeorgeVISide.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

My favourite British coronation medal (maybe cause i like the style of big Roman 1st century bronzes):

 

med104.jpg

 

official coronation medal of George IV., by Benedetto Pistrucci, 1821 AD.,

Bronze Medal (35 mm / 22,71 g),

Obv.: GEORGIUS IIII D . G. - BRITANNIARUM REX F . D. / (beneath neck signed:) B. P. , (George IV, by the grace of God, king of the British, defender of the faith) , laureate head of George IV facing left.

Rev.: PROPRIO JAM JURE ANIMO PATERNO. / INAUGURATUS / DIE. JULII. XIX / ANNO. MDCCCXXI (in baseline above exergue signed:) B. P. , (Now in his own right with his father's mind / crowned / on the 19th day of July / in the year 1821) , an allegorical coronation scene, king enthroned left, crowned by Victory; before him standing Britannia, Hibernia and Scotia, their right hands over altar.

BHM 1070 ; Wollaston xv ; Eimer 1146 .

 

rgds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

966279.jpg

 

Coronation Medal George III & Charlotte 1761. 24mm Gilt bronze. K. GEO & Q. CHARL. CROWND.SEP.22.1761 Rev. VIRTUE. AND BEAUTY CROWN OUR. KING AND: QUEEN * BHM# 46. Does not match Brown's description, but the British Museum confirms this is #46 RR.

967705.jpg

George III Coronation Medal. 1761. Obv. GEORGIUS III. REX. BRITANNIUM*. Rev. NATUS 4 JUNE 1738 CORONATUS 22 SEPT. 1761. BHM# 32 Br. 20mm RR. by E. Thomason.

967703.jpg

 

Queen Victoria Coronation Medal.BHM# 1853. AE. Silvered R. 29mm.

960673.jpg

Queen Victoria Coronation Medal 1838. Unlisted in this size or metal. Same design as BHM#1861 RR. but that is brass 24mm. This is WM. 33mm so extremely rare

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
  • 10 months later...
My favourite British coronation medal (maybe cause i like the style of big Roman 1st century bronzes):

 

med104.jpg

 

official coronation medal of George IV., by Benedetto Pistrucci, 1821 AD.,

Bronze Medal (35 mm / 22,71 g),

Obv.: GEORGIUS IIII D . G. - BRITANNIARUM REX F . D. / (beneath neck signed:) B. P. , (George IV, by the grace of God, king of the British, defender of the faith) , laureate head of George IV facing left.

Rev.: PROPRIO JAM JURE ANIMO PATERNO. / INAUGURATUS / DIE. JULII. XIX / ANNO. MDCCCXXI (in baseline above exergue signed:) B. P. , (Now in his own right with his father's mind / crowned / on the 19th day of July / in the year 1821) , an allegorical coronation scene, king enthroned left, crowned by Victory; before him standing Britannia, Hibernia and Scotia, their right hands over altar.

BHM 1070 ; Wollaston xv ; Eimer 1146 .

 

rgds.

 

Superb! like this one...its amazing!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 years later...
  • 5 weeks later...

Hi,

Can anyone give me any info on this coin/medal please.

Its a coronation coin of George V / Queen Mary.

I found it about 15 years ago and its been in a drawer since and I have just come across it.

I can't find one thats identical on the internet although many variations.

I guess it could be a reproduction but have not a clue.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/z9rcgr3cmlasyr2/IMG_1266%5B1%5D.JPG

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ngxqmh4uukl8qpz/IMG_1269%5B1%5D.JPG

 

 

I can't figure out how to load the images so hope the link is ok.

 

 

Thanks

Sue

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...