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Cardinal Richelieu, Cast Bronze Tribute Medal, 1631


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This was cast when most people still believed that the Earth was the centre of the universe.

 

Armand-Jean Duplessis (1585-1642), Cardinal Richelieu, Cast Bronze Tribute Medal, 1631, by Jean Warin (1606-72),

obverse legend: ARMANVS IOAN CARD DE RICHELIEV bust right wearing biretta and robes, signed below, rev globe within a circle of stars, guided by a winged genius, MENS SIDERA VOLVIT, 51mm.

 

See another one here CoinArchive Richelieu

 

I have no idea when mine was actually casted, but it seems to be quite old!

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Thanks to Ben Weiss Collection:

 

Jean Warin led a somewhat checkered personal life. He seduced the wife of one of his compatriots and was accused at one point of forging coins, for which he was sentenced to banishment for five years. Fortunately for him he had cultivated a champion in Cardinal Richelieu, who, so as not to lose the skill of this great artist, intervened on his behalf, resulting in a pardon.

 

Jean Warin produced this medal to flatter Richelieu and to win him over to his side when Warin was accused of forgery. The reverse of this medal refers to Richelieu's success in dealing with the intrigues against him. The medal suggests that it is the Cardinal's intellect which governs the motion of celestial bodies (Jones).

 

MENS SIDERA VOLVIT. (His Intellect Makes the Stars Revolve)

LINK TO BEN WEISS COLLECTION

 

My cast looks to be very similar to Ben's lead example of this medal, down to the flaw between the stars.

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What a fascinating token. The only thing I know of this historic personage is through Alexandré Dumas novels. I didn't even know he was a real person until I starting looking him up!

 

Thank you for sharing. :ninja:

 

Richelieu was the most powerful man in France, after the King. Some people believed he actually wielded more power than the King, but he still depended on the King's good favour.

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Another awesome piece, Constanius.

 

Richelieu was also known as the scourge of French Protestants. Louis XIII, a rather ineffectual king but fervent Catholic, gave him leave to chase the Huguenots from France, which he did rather ruthlessly, especially in his siege and eventual taking of the city of La Rochelle in 1627-28. Thanks to Richelieu many French Protestants left for America. Their descendants include Paul Revere, John Jay (first Supreme Court judge) and Louis Tiffany, the jeweler.

 

Richelieu also had great influence in the arts. He started the Académie française, that rather musty authority on the French language, in 1635. In Cyrano de Bergerac, a character offers to show some of Cyrano's unpublished plays to Richelieu, saying "Don't worry, he'll only change a few lines." Cyrano, too proud to accept anyone's editing, refuses.

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Another awesome piece, Constanius.

 

Richelieu was also known as the scourge of French Protestants. Louis XIII, a rather ineffectual king but fervent Catholic, gave him leave to chase the Huguenots from France, which he did rather ruthlessly

 

England also benefited from the exodus of the Huguenots as many settled in England and brought their skills with them.

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REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES 1685. This was issued in 1885 by the Huguenot Churches of London as a 200 year commemerative. London is where many of the Huguenots settled after fleeing France to avoid the fate depicted on the medal.

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A very interesting piece you have there Constanius, and thanks once again for the insight behind the piece. I thought I recognised the design though! it also appeared on a jeton struck for Richelieu in 1635 (see Below). I haven't found the time to properly research the piece though. Jetons for Richelieu were issued in his name from 1631 through to his death in 1642. He was a very astute man indeed. Rather `focused' on his objectives, and ruthless in terms of achieving them.

 

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A very interesting piece you have there Constanius, and thanks once again for the insight behind the piece. I thought I recognised the design though! it also appeared on a jeton struck for Richelieu in 1635 (see Below). I haven't found the time to properly research the piece though. Jetons for Richelieu were issued in his name from 1631 through to his death in 1642. He was a very astute man indeed. Rather `focused' on his objectives, and ruthless in terms of achieving them.

 

Nice jeton Ian. It is so nice to have this forum, to share our finds and to learn from each other. As to Richelieu being ruthless, how about this as a quote

 

If you give me six lines written

by the most honest man, I will find

something in them to hang him.

 

—Cardinal Richelieu

 

Nice one Richy!!!

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