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Early Indian coins


De Orc
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Have added these to my online collection at Omni over the past few days, got some more to come as well LOL

 

Godaji trishul

1 Kori

Kutch

 

Bundi Princley State

Copper Sqr coin

 

Parthia

224

Silver Billion

 

Malawa Sutanate

1400

Love Tanka

 

Maharaja Desalji Trammbio

1741

Kutch

 

Mysore Sutanate

1772-1799

Elephant

 

Silharas of Khankan

1000 to1200

Silver drachm, Anonymous

 

15 mm, 3.6 gm.

Stylized Sasanian-like bust, right, corrupt and stylized Brahmi legend

 

Stylized horseman spearing two fallen enemies.

Mitchiner NIS 651v

 

Samanta Deva

850 to 970

Silver drachm

15mm, 3.2grams

Stylized horseman holding spear riding right

Stylized humped bull with Brahmi name

 

Mughal Aurangze Alamgir [world-shaker].

1658 to 1707

Half Paisa

Arcott Mint

 

Unknown Date

Baroda State

1730 to 1949

Copper Dam

18mm, 11g

 

Unknown Date

Jodhpur State

Rajashthan

2 Paisa

 

Please follow the link in my Sig to view them :ninja:

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Have added these two to the collection today :ninja:

 

Sunga Empire

187-75 BC

Cast copper

1/2 Karshapana

Swastika & Elephant

Cross & Bunny ears

 

Sunga Empire

187-75 BC

Cast copper

1/2 Karshapana

Cross & horse

Cross & crown

 

The Sunga Empire (or Shunga Empire) is a Magadha dynasty that controlled North-central and Eastern India as well as parts of the northwest (now Pakistan) from around 185 to 73 BC. It was established after the fall of the Indian Mauryan empire. The capital of the Sungas was Pataliputra. Later kings such as Bhagabhadra also held court at Vidisa, modern Besnagar in Eastern Malwa. [1] The Sunga Empire is noted for its numerous wars with both foreign and indigenous powers. Although very much isn't known, the Mathura school of art and the works of Patanjali colored North India during this empire.

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And another four for your viewing pleasure LOL

 

800-850 AD

Early Indian imitation of a Sassanid drachm

Stylized head of Khushrau facing right

Stylized fire altar with attendants on both sides

 

414 - 455 AD

The Gupta Empire

Local imitations of a silver drachm of King Kumaragupta I

Crude bust of king

Formalized Garuda standing facing with spread wings, degraded Brahmi inscriptions

 

1411-1442

Sultan Nasir al-Din Ahmad Shah Gujarat

Arabic legends

 

1411-1442

Sultan Nasir al-Din Ahmad Shah Gujarat

Arabic legends

 

I have no idea as to what the value is of the last two coins :ninja:

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  • 2 weeks later...
Have added these two to the collection today :ninja:

 

Sunga Empire

187-75 BC

Cast copper

1/2 Karshapana

Swastika & Elephant

Cross & Bunny ears

 

Sunga Empire

187-75 BC

Cast copper

1/2 Karshapana

Cross & horse

Cross & crown

Nice collection, De Orc. The "bunny ears" are actually a three-arched hill, which appears in various forms (some of which are shown below) on early Indian coins.

HillUPL.jpg

 

More info at http://banglapedia.net/HT/C_0054.HTM

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The Tippu Sultan coin could be a 1/2 Paisa or lower denomination, depending on it's size and weight

 

You may want to check out these public-domain e-books available at the Internet Archive:

 

The coins of Haidar Ali and Tipu Sultan by J.R. Henderson

http://www.archive.org/details/coinsofhaidarali00henduoft

 

Edgar Thurston's coins catalogue for Mysore at http://www.archive.org/details/coinsindiamad00goveuoft

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Just added these to the Omni collection :ninja:

 

1206 - 1526

Lahor Sultanate/Delhi sultan

Smant Deo

Silver

Bull & horse

Star fish

 

1510-1530

Malwa Sultanate

Mahmud Shah II

Silver Tankah

16mm diameter

Malwa asserted its independence from the Dehli Sultanate in 1401. It stayed independent until 1561 when it was annexed to the Mughal Empire by Akbar,

 

By the time of the Lodhis, coins were struck almost exclusively of copper and billon. In the provinces, the Bengal Sultans, the Jaunpur Sultans, the Bahamanis of the Deccan, the Sultans of Malwa, the Sultans of Gujarat, etc. struck coins. In the South, however, the Vijayanagar Empire evolved coinage of different metrology and design which was to remain as a standard in the region and influence coin design up to the 19th Century. Malwa Sultan AD 1510-1530 silver Tanka

 

1562

Kashmir Sultanate

Chakk Dynasty

Hussain Ghazi Shah

Punchshi

 

1581

Mughal Emperor Akbar 1556-1605

Bronze 1/2 dam

Persian inscriptions on both sides

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Great collection you have there!

 

I am a collector of Indian coins too. Nice to see someone with a similar area of interest :ninja:.

The only difference is that being from India, I can probably pick up Indian coins for a fraction of the cost you might pay in UK. lol! Guess the stupid antiquities law in India preventing export of anything older than a hundred years makes collecting easier for Indian collectors like me! (I knew the Indian government would get SOMETHING right!).

 

Looking forward to exchanging some notes on Indian coins with you.

 

regards

 

porthos

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Thanks Porthos, I am a very basic collector at the moment but learning as I go along, I am facinated by the amount of variety out there got a number still to scan and post as well. If you see anything that I have got wrong or have any additional info please do contact me. Some of the coins I have picked up quite cheep as there do not seem to be that many interested in them, a few have cost a bit more though LOL. I am trying to get as many different as I possibly can :ninja:

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The Tippu Sultan coin could be a 1/2 Paisa or lower denomination, depending on it's size and weight

 

You may want to check out these public-domain e-books available at the Internet Archive:

 

The coins of Haidar Ali and Tipu Sultan by J.R. Henderson

http://www.archive.org/details/coinsofhaidarali00henduoft

 

Edgar Thurston's coins catalogue for Mysore at http://www.archive.org/details/coinsindiamad00goveuoft

The reverse shows your coin to be an anonymous kasu of the Wodeyar Dynasty of Mysore, not Tippu Sultan.

 

Similar coins can be seen here

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  • 4 months later...

Been a bit lax with this section of my collection but these two arrived recently :ninja: A bit of history added with one and more reserch needed on the other LOL

 

Maitrikas of Vallabhi-Bhakta Mahaamata 470 Ad Ar Drachm

Anonymous Maitrika ruler of Vallabhi

470 - 800 AD, Saurashtra

AR drachm 2 gm

Bust of the ruler facing right

Rajno Maha kshatrapa Paramaditya

Bhakta Mahasamanta Sri Sarvya

Bhattaraka, Prongs with short handle

 

 

956730.jpg

 

Indo Sythian Billion Drachm of Rujuvula 10Bc 10Ad

 

The Indo-Scythians are a branch of the Indo-Iranian Sakas (Scythians), who migrated from southern Siberia into Bactria, Sogdiana, Arachosia, Gandhara, Kashmir, Punjab, and into parts of Western and Central India, Gujarat and Rajasthan, from the middle of the 2nd century BCE to the 4th century CE. The first Saka king in India was Maues or Moga who established Saka power in Gandhara and gradually extended supremacy over north-western India. Indo-Scythian rule in India ended with the last Western Satrap Rudrasimha III in 395 CE.

 

The invasion of India by Scythian tribes from Central Asia, often referred to as the Indo-Scythian invasion, played a significant part in the history of India as well as nearby countries. In fact, the Indo-Scythian war is just one chapter in the events triggered by the nomadic flight of Central Asians from conflict with Chinese tribes which had lasting effects on Bactria, Kabol, Parthia and India as well as far off as Rome in the west.

 

The Scythian groups that invaded India and set up various kingdoms, may have included besides the Sakas other allied tribes, such as the Parama Kambojas, Bahlikas, Rishikas and Paradas.

 

Rajuvula was an Indo-Scythian Great Satrap (Mahakshatrapa) who ruled in the area of Mathura in northern India in the years around 10 CE. In central India, the Indo-Scythians conquered the area of Mathura over Indian kings around 60 BCE. Some of their satraps were Hagamasha and Hagana, who were in turn followed by Rajuvula.

 

Rajuvula is thought to have invaded the last of the Indo-Greek territories in the eastern Punjab, and killed the last of the Indo-Greek kings, Strato II and his son.

 

956729.jpg

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Thanks guy's I would like to find some books on the subject but have no idea as what to look for first LOL

Hi

 

I am listing below the reference books I have. Should anyone require information from any of these, please feel free to contact me:

 

Indian Numismatics by DD Kosambi

 

India Silver Punchmarked Coins by P.L. Gupta and Terry Hardaker

 

The Standard Guide to South Asian Coins and Paper Money Since 1556 (First edition)

Contents

Mughal empire (starting with Akbar)

Independent kingdoms

Indian Princely States

Indo-Danish coins

Indo-French coins

Indo-Dutch coins

Indo-Portuguese coins

British India coins

Afghanistan

Andaman Islands

Bangladesh

Bhutan

Burma

India - Republic

Maldive Islands

Nepal

Pakistan

Sri Lanka/Ceylon

Tibet

Paper money, Hundis, cheques, etc.

 

Couplets on Mughal Coins of India by Manik Jain

 

Coins and Currency Systems in South India by B. Chattopadhyaya

 

Ancient Indian Coinage by Rekha Jain

 

The Coinage of Ancient India by S.R. Goyal

 

Catalogue of the Coins of the Gupta Dynasties and of Sasanka, King of Gauda by John Allan

 

History of the Coinage of the Territories of the East India Company In the Indian Peninsula and Catalogue of the Coins in the Madras Museum by Edgar Thurston

 

The Copper Coins of India (Volumes I and II) by W.H. Valentine

 

Catalogue of the Coins of Ancent India by John Allan

 

The following books are now in public domain and can be downloaded free of cost from the Internet Archive:

 

Catalogue Of Coins In The Panjab Museum Lahore: Vol I (Indo-Greek coins) by R.B. Whitehead

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofcoins014629mbp

 

Catalogue Of Coins In The Panjab Museum Lahore: Vol II (Coins of the Mughal Emperors) by R.B. Whitehead

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofcoins02lahouoft

 

Catalogue Of Coins In The Panjab Museum Lahore: Vol III (Coins of Nadir Shah and the Durrani dynasty) by R.B. Whitehead

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/CatalogueOf...seumLahoreVolII

 

Catalogue of coins in the Provincial museum, Lucknow: Vol. I (Prefaces and Plates) by C.J. Brown

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofcoins01luck

 

Catalogue of coins in the Provincial museum, Lucknow: Vol. II (Catalogue) by C.J. Brown

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/catalogueofcoins02luckiala

 

Coins-Government Museum (Madras, India) (Catalogue No. 1. Mysore; Catalogue No. 2. Roman, Indo-Portuguese, and Ceylon; Catalogue No. 3. Sultáns of Dehlí) by Edgar Thurston

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/coinsindiamad00goveuoft

 

The coins of Haidar Ali and Tipu Sultan by J. R. Henderson

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/coinsofhaidarali00hend

 

The Coins of the Sultáns of Dehlí in the British Museum by Stanley Lane-Poole

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/coinssultnsdehl00medagoog

 

Gold And Silver Coins Of Sultans Of Delhi by Mohd. Awali Khan

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/goldandsilvercoi019909mbp

 

Catalogue of the coins in the Indian Museum, Calcutta (Vol. 1, Part 1: The Early Foreign Dynasties and the Guptas) by Vincent A. Smith

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/pt1catalogueofco01indiuoft

 

Catalogue of the coins in the Indian Museum, Calcutta (Vol. 1, Part 2: Ancient Coins of Indian Types) by Vincent A. Smith

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/pt2catalogueofco01indiuoft

 

Catalogue of the coins in the Indian Museum, Calcutta (Vol. 1, Part 3: Persian Mediaeval, South Indian, and Miscellaneous Coins) by Vincent A. Smith

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/pt3catalogueofco01indiuoft

 

Catalogue Of The Coins In The Indian Museum, Calcutta (Vol. III: Mughal Emperors) by H.Nelson Wright

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/CatalogueOf...nMuseumCalcutta

 

The epoch of the Sah kings of Surashtra, illustrated by their coins by Edward Thomas

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/epochofsahkingso00thomrich

 

Coins and chronology of the early independent sultans of Bengal by Nalinikanta Bhattasali

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/coinschronologyo00bhatuoft

 

On the coins of the Patan sultans of Hindustan by Edward Thomas

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/oncoinsofpatansu00thomrich

 

The pre-Mohammedan coinage of Northwestern India by R.B. Whitehead

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/premohammedancoi00whitrich

 

Lectures on ancient Indian numismatics by D.R. Bhandarkar

Link: http://www.archive.org/details/lecturesonancien00bhaniala

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