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1939 Jefferson nickel with double Monticello building?


Dmytro
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Hello,

Today I found a 1939 Jefferson nickel that seems to have a double Monticello building. High-resolution scan:

http://exvision.net/Dmytro/1939-Nickel-Double-Building.jpg

I can't find information about there having been a 1939 nickel with a double building. Could this be a very rare coin? Or maybe what appears to be the building's reflection is some age-related wear?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Hello,

Today I found a 1939 Jefferson nickel that seems to have a double Monticello building. High-resolution scan:

http://exvision.net/Dmytro/1939-Nickel-Double-Building.jpg

I can't find information about there having been a 1939 nickel with a double building. Could this be a very rare coin? Or maybe what appears to be the building's reflection is some age-related wear?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

Not sure if this helps but this is my only 1939 nickel.

 

1939p_nickelbk.jpg

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Hello,

Today I found a 1939 Jefferson nickel that seems to have a double Monticello building. High-resolution scan:

http://exvision.net/Dmytro/1939-Nickel-Double-Building.jpg

I can't find information about there having been a 1939 nickel with a double building. Could this be a very rare coin? Or maybe what appears to be the building's reflection is some age-related wear?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

 

are you sure its 1939? your nickel is a wartime silver nickel the large P above Monticello gives it away

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They are correct, you have a wartime issue Jefferson nickel.

 

It was minted between 1942-1945 (what does your coin say?), contains 40% silver, and from what I see shows no signs of doubling.

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I'm sorry, it is a 1943 nickel. I guess it is some type of corrosion, especially since the outline of the building is not perfect.

Maybe I'll rub the nickel with some stain-removing chemical to find out for sure.

Thanks for your help.

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I know you guys mean well to tell him not to clean it. But if it's corroded, it's already only worth the content of the silver and nothing more. Normally I would say NEVER CLEAN A COIN with the rest of them, but in this instance...go for it, you'll not hurt it's value anymore than the corrosion already has.

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  • 1 year later...

I see what he's talking about, but that's definately not doubling, since it's on both sides of monticello. My best guess is that the image of Monticello, being the highest point on the back of the coin after the rim, probably sheltered the area immediately around it from whatever corroded the coin so badly.

 

I would personally recommend against using a chemical cleaner on the nickel, but I would concur that it would be difficult to damage the coin much further.

 

Regardless of its condition, war nickels are always cool to find. During the past year I have searched through more than 5,000 nickels and I've only found one war nickel.

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Hello,

Today I found a 1939 Jefferson nickel that seems to have a double Monticello building. High-resolution scan:

http://exvision.net/Dmytro/1939-Nickel-Double-Building.jpg

I can't find information about there having been a 1939 nickel with a double building. Could this be a very rare coin? Or maybe what appears to be the building's reflection is some age-related wear?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

If you clicked on the photo it would zoom in and show numerous oddities of some type of doubling. The ghost above the Dome really appears to be some form of corrosion but why only on the top of the dome? Next look carefully at the P above the Dome and you will see an apparent RPM or also some form of doubling. Now if you really look at the lettering at the top, E Pluribus Unum you would also note the appearance of some type of doubling. Naturally lots of wear and being so much of a softer metal, many such details are fading. If I were you I'd check much further on what that may be and DO NOT CLEAN.

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Does the monticello appear to be doubled on the same side of the coin, or do both the obverse and reverse of the coin bear the image of monticello (intended for the reverse only)? If both the obverse and reverse of the coin bear the image of Monticello, you have quite a rare error coin on your hands. I'm no expert on error coins, but such a coin would almost certainly fetch at least $10-20, possibly up to $100. I'd get it checked by an expert, though.

 

As for your quarter, it's difficult to tell without a photograph, but it would fetch no less than melt value, which is about $2.50 with today's silver prices. $3-4 would be about the most you could expect from such a coin if it's circulated.

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I, too, have this nickel. It has Monticello on both sides, minted in Philadelphia, undated. Anyone know a value on such a coin? I also have a 1952 silver quarter. Any ideas of value on that? Very good condition.

 

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OK so you have a Nickel with no obverse. This is usually a magicians coin. Many are with two heads and some with two tails. Unfortunately for the magician, when they do thier tricks with those coins they tend to vanish into a crowd. From there they get spent as normal coins. There are Pennies, Nickels, Dimes, etc made that way. If you find a magic shop or go on line for magic tricks, you could buy as many of those as you want but they are rather on the expensive side. The Half dollar, two headed coin sells for $25 by me. The Nickel one you have sells for about $5 to $10.

As for you 1952 Quarter. In order for anyone to evaluate that coin we would have to know the condition and if there is a mint mark.

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