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Which do you find more fulfilling?


Ætheling

Which do you find more fulfilling?  

32 members have voted

  1. 1. Which do you find more fulfilling?

    • Owning coins
      3
    • Reading about coins
      1
    • Both but i enjoy owning coins more
      11
    • Both but i enjoy reading about them more
      5
    • Both equally
      12
    • Neither i'm just in it for the investment
      0


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This comment from Art got me thinking;

 

I just finished reading a book about the 1794 Large Cents. It's called "Provenance Gallery of the Year 1794 United States Large Cents". The book was great. I really enjoyed reading about the early days of the US Mint and all that went into the production of these terrific coins.

 

 

 

I'm sure we all enjoy doing some coin related reading every now and again, but sometimes i often wonder what is more fulfilling in the long run?

 

Is it better to own a great coin and just know the basic facts about it? (i.e what it is, what it's worth now, where it was minted and how many were minted) Or is it better to not own the coin but to know everything about it, the historical context, the kinds of people that spent it, how it was minted, who designed it, it's contemporary popularity, etc.

 

It might seem strange to many (and perhaps only Michael will agree with me), but have you ever found yourself to get more fulfillment out of just reading about a coin than having it?

 

Obviously i should think the best combination is to read about a coin and to own it but say it's a 1933 double eagle. Someone has given you the money to afford that one specimen that's been officially released. But would you get more fulfillment out of owning that coin or would you get more fulfillment out of just reading about it and perhaps merely seeing it or just holding it the once?

 

 

It's easy to jump straight in and say, 'why i'd take the coin', but lets face it once you've got the 1933 double eagle well your never going to be able to really better that purchase are you? Every other Saint would then be run of the mill no?

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Guest Stujoe

I went with both equally. I am a big reader and always have been. So is my wife and it has also transferred down to our kids. I can't say that I could just read about coins and not own them but I certainly enjoy the reading a lot. I think they compliment each other.

 

In addition, there are plenty of coins that I can read about, learn about and see through books, websites, etc that I could never hope to own. That is one thing about my reading...I do not just read about the coins I collect. I read about all sorts of different coins. My favorite is to learn the history behind the coins, the mints, the designers, etc and how the coins relate to what they do in our lives.

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I voted nearly the same, i'm 45% own, 55% read.

 

Dunno i find i suffer from 'novelty value', when i first get a coin it's all the rage... two weeks later i've forgotten i've got it and i'm after the next one.

 

With reading though i can read something two or three times quite happily, i've been doing alot of mid-late medieval reading lately, which despite it not being exactly the area i'm even working on, i do find it incredibly interesting.

 

 

I could do with more US coin books and some French ones. But at the moment the 45% side is winning through because i've got coins on hold and reserved awaiting purchasing.

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I like both, but owning the coin more so. You can read and learn about a great many things, antiques, old cars, rare paintings etc but coins are one of the few things that have some history behind them that you can also actually own without living in a tent.

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I went with both equally. I am a big reader and always have been. So is my wife and it has also transferred down to our kids. I can't say that I could just read about coins and not own them but I certainly enjoy the reading a lot. I think they compliment each other.

 

In addition, there are plenty of coins that I can read about, learn about and see through books, websites, etc that I could never hope to own. That is one thing about my reading...I do not just read about the coins I collect. I read about all sorts of different coins. My favorite is to learn the history behind the coins, the mints, the designers, etc and how the coins relate to what they do in our lives.

 

I am the same as Stujoe on this one. Being able to read about the coins answers alot of questions when you're holding that coin in your hand and all those thoughts about the coin are running through you're head. :ninja:

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I'd say both owning and reading. If I could only do one, it would be reading. I find the peripheral information that comes with reading about the coins to be as interesting as the info about the coins. In the book I just finished about the 1794 Cents, they talked about what a problem it was in the first days of the mint to get copper. Ships fittings and cooking utensils were melted. That's one of the reasons that there's such disparity in the early cents - the blanks were made from this "home brew" and everything from the content to the form was questionable.

 

They discussed that the mint workers worked 6 days a week from 6am or 7am (seasonal) for 11 hours. For this they were paid the princely sum of $1.29 per day. It's no wonder they needed 1/2 cents and that cents were essentially the first coins minted and distributed.

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I really like learning about the history of coins in general but owning the coins just makes it more....real I guess to me. Looking at a coin in a book is great but when the coin is right there in your hands it kind of makes all the learning worth it. After learning about a coin you don't view it as a round piece of metal but something that has many, many years of history behind it.

 

I've always wondered who has handled the coins I own. Maybe Charles Manson used it to buy an ice cold soda one day or even Emperor Nero paid one of his servents.

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The only reason why I edged towards books is because it just simply gives infomation about coins that we can't possibly obtain, supposingly if a particular coin starts to hit way over 10,000USD or something, or trial coins, which we have no way of obtaining :ninja:

 

Of course, if I could obtain such coins, it would be nice to read the history of them too. ;)

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Unfortunately, on a college student's budget, I can only afford to read about the coins. And even then, I have to rent those books from the library. Just read one specifically about Lincoln Cents, though. Very interesting...had no idea there were so many die varieties and errors out there. The best thing about this forum is that it is free! :ninja:

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Both. but reading more. However, it is funny, but I will admit this: When I first got started, I found a Krause Standard Catalog used for a couple of dollars and I went through it a few times, looking at all the pictures and wishing there were more words. Well, I was at a coin dealer's and I had to wait a bit, so I was standing there, fishing in the junk box and I found a large Chinese 10 cash. These are large local bronze coins with a central dragon and European legends from the late empire circa 1905. I was stunned. I bought them all and I bought more and I really got into the details -- whiskers and claws to tell one variety from another -- and all that. So, books are fine, but if you never look at the subject matter itself, you might miss something.

 

I own a couple of ancients that are unique. There is no surprise in that. As Frank Robinson points out in Confessions of a Numismatic Fanatic, anyone who studies any aspect of the hobby for any time will eventually acquire

something rarer than a Brasher Doubloon. You don't find them in books.

 

So, I'm a book guy, but my nod to the material is not idle.

 

Sheriff Hank Keough: I... I... I never heard of a crocodile crossing an ocean.

Hector Cyr: Well, they conceal information like that in books.

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I like owning better than reading. I'm more of a general fact kind of person. I don't know exactly why, that's just the way I've always been in everything really. I do read a bit, but owning, feeling, seeing, photographing is more important to me. So I chose both but owning more.

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Both equally. One of the best things to do is to sit on the sofa and read about coins with a coin album next to me :ninja:

I wouldn't be able to collect coins in the way I now do without a lot of studying. To me it's important to know about the time when the coin was minted, so I read lots of history books. Coins are a wonderful way to concretisize history.

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  • 1 year later...

owning coins, I only have the books to ID the coins I take a liking to and see if prices are fair before I buy...save for ancients, I have no real motive in my buying habits save if I like the look...makes for a very eclectic collection...

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