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Appearently Gettysburg was the first 2011 quarter.

 

Does anyone know how many Territory quarters there are? I've got DC, Guam, and NMI so far.

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I think I have only gotten one 2011 quarter, nope, just pulled them off my desk and I have two. A Gettysburg and a Glacier NP. They were under a Jamaica 10c from 1969 that I got in change as a quarter somewhere recently.

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Appearently Gettysburg was the first 2011 quarter.

 

Does anyone know how many Territory quarters there are? I've got DC, Guam, and NMI so far.

 

I believe there are six territories quarters.

 

Wash. DC

Puerto Rico

Guam

American Samoa

US Virgin Islands

Northern Mariana Islands

 

Got a 1957-D Roosevelt in change this past week.

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I believe there are six territories quarters.

 

Wash. DC

Puerto Rico

Guam

American Samoa

US Virgin Islands

Northern Mariana Islands

 

Got a 1957-D Roosevelt in change this past week.

 

:bthumbsup: on the dime, and thanks for the list!

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DC is not as difficult as the other '09s to find, although I may be a bit biased. Back around June '09 the cash office at my work got an entire box of BU DC quarters, so they were literally all I saw for about 2 months. I kept 2 BU rolls for myself, and haven't kept any since then.

 

Also, off of what Ikaros said, are the '71 quarters really that hard to find? I've never noticed before...

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Last week, from small change at the motorway gas station, somewhere in the middle of Europe:

 

 

Slove20C07.jpg

 

Slovenia, Republic, designers: Luc Luycx (obverse, LL-mark) and Janez Boljka, Maja Licul, Miljenko Licul (all for the reverse), Helsinki-Vantaa mint (Finland), 2007 AD.,

20 Euro Cent (22 mm / 5,77 g), brass, mintage 37.150.000 , "Spanish flower" shape (round, notched by seven indents), medal alignment, smooth edge (notched by seven indents),

Obv.: *S*L*O*V*E*N*I*J*A* / LIPICANEC // * (Fi) 2007 * , two Lipizzaner horses prancing left; 12 stars around and between outer legend; below, mintmark Fi (incuse shape at an elevated square) between year and the next star to left.

Rev.: 20 / EURO / CENT / LL , a map of Europe on the left, six fine lines cut through the sea, breaking when passing through the map, and at their ends at the top and bottom are twelve stars (reflective of the flag of Europe). To the right, in raised lettering, is "20 Euro Cent" with the '20' being shown much larger than the words. The designers initials, LL (Luc Luycx), appearing right next to the 0 in 20.

KM 72 . a circulation coin

 

from wikipedia:

The Lipizzan or Lipizzaner (Slovene: Lipicanec, Croatian: Lipicanac), is a breed of horse closely associated with the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, Austria, where the finest representatives demonstrate the haute ecole or "high school" movements of classical dressage, including the highly controlled, stylized jumps and other movements known as the "airs above the ground." The Lipizzan breed dates back to the 16th century, when it was developed with the support of the Habsburg nobility. The breed takes its name from one of the earliest stud farms established, located near the Kras village of Lipica (spelled "Lipizza" in Italian), in modern-day Slovenia.

The ancestors of the Lipizzan can be traced to approximately A.D. 800. The earliest predecessors of the Lipizzan originated in the 7th century when Barb horses were brought into Spain by the Moors and crossed on native Spanish stock. The result was the Andalusian horse and other Iberian horse breeds.

By the 16th century, when the Habsburgs ruled both Spain and Austria, a powerful but agile horse was desired both for military uses and for use in the fashionable and rapidly growing riding schools for the nobility of central Europe. Therefore, in 1562, the Habsburg Emperor Maximillian II brought the Spanish Andalusian horse to Austria and founded the court stud at Kladrub. In 1580, his brother, Archduke Charles II, established a similar stud at Lipizza (now Lipica), located in modern-day Slovenia, from which the breed obtained its name.

Kladrub and Lipizza stock were bred to the native Karst (Kras) horses, and succeeding generations were crossed with the now-extinct Neapolitan breed from Italy and other Baroque horses of Spanish descent obtained from Spain, Germany, Denmark. While breeding stock was exchanged between the two studs, Kladrub specialized in producing heavy carriage horses, while riding and light carriage horses came from the Lipizza stud.

Beginning in 1920, the Piber Federal Stud, near Graz, Austria, became the main stud for the horses used in Vienna. Breeding became very selective, only allowing stallions that had proved themselves at the Riding School to stand at stud, and only breeding mares who had passed rigorous performance testing.

 

hope you like it

 

 

:)

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I believe USA and Switzerland are the only countries in the world where it is possible to find sometimes coins that are over 100 years old - probably more likely in Switzerland because designs didn't change for so long. The Swiss franc is also the only currency that has significantly appreciated vs. the US $, is now worth 5 X what it's exchange rate was 100 years ago.

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Just got a 1977 FRN $1 in change. It's in great shape for a note that old. Strong center crease but no tears or missing corners. Clean surfaces. No scan - can't get scanner working right now.

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been to hawai'i, first time dipping into US circulation coinage, and hawaii turns up interesting stuff if you want good grade coinage

cents

1968 D - corroded detail is there, has a rust colour and look to it.

1971 s - reverse has the signs of being ran over by vehicles, shame really, obverse details put it in VF's

1984 D - a nice cent, seen little use, (nasty fingerprint on obverse and some lustre fading) stuck on a thinning planchet (bottom parts of states looks less struck) and quite heavy obverse strike gives the ghosting effect.

1993 D - 60% lustre

1995 D - 40% lustre minimum, some verd though

1996 D - seen little use

1998 - little use seen 60% lustre

a corroded 1997 D

and some curculated 2000-2007 D cents- all seen signs of average wear bar a 2001 D and 2006 (only one with no D in this decade) that looks almost as if it came new out of the roll that day

an interesting 2002 which looks like a poor strike but looks planchet based.

 

nickels

1972 - VF - lustre on obverse around jefferson and lettering - bit scratched up and perhaps weaker striking on reverse makes that side look worse

1978 - well used example but still in the F area, obverse off centre striking almost pushes the top of the 78 off the edge

1998 D - some scratches a solid EF with lustre

1999 D - as above really, bar some interesting "dings" on reverse which look like someone making them

 

dimes

1989 P - EF lost a lot of lustre but still shines in places

1989 D - almost full lustre

1995 D - similar to above

2000 D - same but with dirt on obverse

and a 2010 D

and lastly the quarters

 

1998 D - EF perhaps approaching fresh from roll grade

2002 Ohio - solid EF

and 2006 D nebraska and north dakota in what seems to be full curculation grade fro that period of time

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Well, I don't collect currency, but when a 42-year-old bill in circulated but crisp shape pops out of the self-scan at Giant Eagle, whatchagonnado?

 

1969bobvfiversz.jpg

1969brevfiversz.jpg

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...and let the record show that on the afternoon of Tuesday, July the 25th, 2011, a Utah quarter from the Denver mint found its way into my pocket change, completing my Washington 'from circulation' collection, from 1965 to 2008 -- although the Nevada-D and Hawaii-D could both stand to be upgraded. Also, the DC/Territory and National Park quarters are still resisting discovery for the most part.

 

The toning on the early quarters is getting gorgeous, with both honey gold and gunmetal blue. S'nice. I almost want to go buy genuine mint uncirculated ones to put in there to let *them* tone.

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...and let the record show that on the afternoon of Tuesday, July the 25th, 2011, a Utah quarter from the Denver mint found its way into my pocket change, completing my Washington 'from circulation' collection, from 1965 to 2008 -- although the Nevada-D and Hawaii-D could both stand to be upgraded. Also, the DC/Territory and National Park quarters are still resisting discovery for the most part.

 

The toning on the early quarters is getting gorgeous, with both honey gold and gunmetal blue. S'nice. I almost want to go buy genuine mint uncirculated ones to put in there to let *them* tone.

 

:bthumbsup:

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:clapping: :clapping:

 

I found (maybe one of..) my first NP quarters the other day - a Gettysburg.

 

I also found a Wyoming. I actually like that design. I can't tell if it was worn or that's just the design, but I think it will eventually look nice with wear.

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Nice finds. That 5-spot is super.

Yeah, it's been so long since I've seen a small portrait five, I did a double take... especially when I saw the date. I wonder if there's a good way to de-wrinkle it without doing anything untoward or unacceptably artificial to it.

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Yeah, it's been so long since I've seen a small portrait five, I did a double take... especially when I saw the date. I wonder if there's a good way to de-wrinkle it without doing anything untoward or unacceptably artificial to it.

 

 

Just put it in a non-PVC paper money page, in a binder. Don't try to remove the wrinkles - the results always show later, and I myself look down on such modified items. Generally I do not save the small head notes unless they are from before 1963 or are star notes. I have been known to spend the occasional 1950 dated notes if I get enough of the 1934s in that I can do without the 1950s. Unless they are star notes or in really nice condition they keep only as emergency reserve money in my collection.

 

My own find yesterday - 10 Ike Dollars, one 1971, one 1972, and 8 1976 at my credit union. And they were pleased as punch to get rid of them.

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  • 3 weeks later...

122 more Ike dollars, including a whole bunch of brilliant uncirculateds that have lovely original roll toning. The best coins in the lot rarity wise are the 1973 and the 1977-S proofs. I have pretty much exhausted the large numbers of Jeffersons to go through so I am asking for other stuff at my banks.

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