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A Couple of My Prize Errors


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It happens when there is gas/air bubbles still present after the rolling process to produce blanks. After striking, the rim can crack and eventually split. Haven't heard about any recent years splitting, probably because Australia now imports blanks from Korea. We used to make our own up until about 1984 or there abouts. Mainly occurs in our cupro nickle coins, 5,10,20's and 50 cent pieces. I only have the ones shown at the moment, and have never seen a 1 or 2 cent [copper] or 1 and 2 dollars [aluminiun bronze] having split. Hope this helps.............

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It happens when there is gas/air bubbles still present after the rolling process to produce blanks. After striking, the rim can crack and eventually split. Haven't heard about any recent years splitting, probably because Australia now imports blanks from Korea. We used to make our own up until about 1984 or there abouts. Mainly occurs in our cupro nickle coins, 5,10,20's and 50 cent pieces. I only have the ones shown at the moment, and have never seen a 1 or 2 cent [copper] or 1 and 2 dollars [aluminiun bronze] having split. Hope this helps.............

 

Interesting. So it's just a bubble that was luckily placed as to split the coin down the middle... of the rim. In clad coins I could understand the frequency but this boggles my mind.

 

Thanks for the info :ninja:

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  • 3 weeks later...

I must admit to not knowing about this one.

It's a 1943 Australian florin, it's underweight slightly, any ideas. Thought it might be a forgery, however I don't know.

I haven't got any pics of the reverse, however it is fully struck and has seen circulation.

 

1943florin-1.jpg

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Just to add some detail about split planchets - my understanding is that the air bubble is presents when the sheet is rolled to the specific thickness but is hidden from view obviously. It may be a small bubble that when rolled results in only a small area which is available when the circular blanks are punched out. Conversely there may be quite a large bubble that results in large areas.

The sheet is on rollers and the blanks are punched out much like a cookie cutter as the sheet moves through - as an aside this is where most of the clipped planchets are created.

 

In the coin minting process the pressure of the strike may cause the two pieces to separate immediately or they may be left "hanging by a thread" and normal circulation bumping and knocking results in them separating.

The collecting trick is to get both pieces of the same coin

Here is a 1980 10 cent fully split - same coin

 

1980tenCentsSplitPlanchet.jpg

 

1980tenCentsplitPlanchetInsides.jpg

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Yep, still around - older and uglier by the day.

I like that indented 2 cents very much.

 

I have just been caught up in work/family things and have kept at the collecting game - I will post a lot of new errors and varieties once I get my camera getting decent shots (my wife borrowed my Nikon for the first time and lost her handbag that day) and then get my ftp sorted out.

 

Life is pretty good - looks like snowing in Canberra tonight - I've have seen some amazing coins over the last few months. The high prices of Australian pre decimal silver and copper has dragged out a lot of previously unseen for years coins.

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Been getting a bit cool up here,to mate, down to about 19 at the moment. :ninja:

Got that indented off cobwebs when he listed it on emu.

Have been picking up some nice 62 d/noses lately in good grades.

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This one is one of our more famous coins in the decimal era, a 2000 $1/10c obverse mule.

It took about 2 years after they were mistakenly struck to be discovered, and about a further 3 or 4 years for the Royal Australian Mint to actually admit to the mistake and confirm it is a mule.

The obverse was mistakenly struck with that of a 10c obverse, while the reverse was the standard reverse of the $1.

The coin is known for having a double rim, and the head of the Queen is smaller, than that of the normal $1.

 

Mule-1.jpg

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I've read about the mules. Subtle and all the more interesting.

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Even better when you get them at face value.. :ninja:

 

Cool!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Straight from the postie's mailbag, a couple of the latest purchases.

A 1979 double clipped 50c piece.

 

coins007.jpg

 

This coin has the added bonus of being a double bar variety on the reverse, behind the emu's head.

 

coins005-1.jpg

Double bar varieties in higher grades are getting harder to obtain.

This was purchased as B/Unc.

 

The next is a weak strike or a struckthru grease 20c piece. I am favouring the weak strike, at the moment, not 100% sure.

 

coins011.jpg

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