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The Perfect Coin


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Ha... you are impressive. I was thinking about making a similar thread a few days ago. Seeing what people think of as the perfect coin... independent of an official grade. then compare them to what is considered perfect by a TGS.

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Pick up a coin off the sidewalk.. send it in to SGS and you'll have yourself an MS-70 lol.....they grade almost everything ms-70

:ninja:

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Going to coin shows all the time I too have been looking for the so called perfect coin. I've seen many MS-70 coins in slabs and many in 2x2's. And if you have a really great magnifying glass you can always see problems. When I ask about something like a mark, scratch, dent, etc. I usually hear something like OH, that's nothing. No one takes that into consideration. HUH? Still looking for that REAL MS-70.

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I don't even waste my time looking for a 70. To me there is no such thing. To registry collectors the slabbed ones are highly sought.

 

That comment in and of itself hits the nail on the head. MS70 is a grade only in theory. The perfect coin does not exist. MS70 is a market grade given by the TPGs that are very highly sought by the plastic collectors. The very nature of the minting process itself, from planchet to collector, makes a true MS70 impossible.

 

MS70 is a grade designation that is only possible through pure Market Grading, and is thus the most subjective grade out there in a 70 point Sheldon-type standard.

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When I think of the "perfect coin" or an MS-70 grade, I think of what I'd expect a coin to look like not a moment after brand new dies left the surface.

 

Now, since it's nearly impossible to know what one looks like, I have to extrapolate that based on the coins I've seen. It's an obvious concept, I know, but I'd like to think its a very valuable skill to have and understand.

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As 70's are rarely "perfect" and each grading service holds coins to different standards, I'm going to say a "perfect" coin is in the eye of the beholder. I could look at a coin (the presidential coins) with no flaws and still not consider it perfect. Someone could look at a a coin from the 1700's and, relative to the other coins from that era, consider it a "70" in its own respect.

 

 

This is a little off topic (as this is about 70's) but I feel like grade doesn't matter to a certain point.

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Well, you wanted pictures ... here's mine:

Russia, gold Chervonets 1979

(Does it have to be in a slab to be MS-70? :ninja: )

 

With all due respect to that gorgeous coin but personally, I'd bet that gets an MS-67 with a TPGC.

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With all due respect to that gorgeous coin but personally, I'd bet that gets an MS-67 with a TPGC.

You might very well be right; I would hope that it would get at least that! :ninja: In the meantime, I'm happy with it unslabbed. I know it's not perfect, but like many others have said, there really isn't such a thing as the perfect coin.

 

How about this one? It comes pretty close to MS-70 (PF-69), and it's in a slab:

Russia, 50 Roubles 1993: Rachmaninoff Commemorative (NGC PF-69 Ultra Cameo)

 

Someone in this thread mentioned their opinion that it is not possible on a computer screen to distinguish between anything higher than MS-66. I tend to agree, especially because there are just too many variables involved in taking pictures of coins.

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I have a few MS-70 coins, and if I look hard enough I can find a flaw in each one. I don't think the TPGs consider MS-70 to be "perfect." IMO, an MS-70 coin is one that is just a hair just better than MS-69.

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You might very well be right; I would hope that it would get at least that! :ninja: In the meantime, I'm happy with it unslabbed. I know it's not perfect, but like many others have said, there really isn't such a thing as the perfect coin.

 

How about this one? It comes pretty close to MS-70 (PF-69), and it's in a slab:

Russia, 50 Roubles 1993: Rachmaninoff Commemorative (NGC PF-69 Ultra Cameo)

 

Someone in this thread mentioned their opinion that it is not possible on a computer screen to distinguish between anything higher than MS-66. I tend to agree, especially because there are just too many variables involved in taking pictures of coins.

 

Now that one I agree with. The other had some noticeably rim dings and nicks that bothered me if we were going for perfect.

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I have a solution to this problem. If a sufficient amount of collectors got together and suggested to all organizations that do the grading to change the numbers used in grading to the 100 point system, then there would be lots of 70's. Unfortuately now we would be discussing the MS-100 coins.

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I have a solution to this problem. If a sufficient amount of collectors got together and suggested to all organizations that do the grading to change the numbers used in grading to the 100 point system, then there would be lots of 70's. Unfortuately now we would be discussing the MS-100 coins.

 

CGS Uk work of a 100 point scale:

 

http://www.cgs-uk.biz/cgs-uk/aboutGs

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I do not think that on a pic or an lcd screen you can see anything better then a true MS66

 

i don't agree--the quality of the photo (which would include bit density, number of colors, ...) figures big-time into this sort of thing.

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i don't agree--the quality of the photo (which would include bit density, number of colors, ...) figures big-time into this sort of thing.

 

Just take a look at Heritage's lots. They've got the best imaging I've seen on the net for coins. Of course it has its limits but what is the size of the smallest imperfection that keeps a coin from being a 69/70??

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i don't agree--the quality of the photo (which would include bit density, number of colors, ...) figures big-time into this sort of thing.

 

Just take a look at Heritage's lots. They've got the best imaging I've seen on the net for coins. Of course it has its limits but what is the size of the smallest imperfection that keeps a coin from being a 69/70??

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