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How can I tell silver from... not silver.


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I don't really know how to tell the difference. The reason I ask is I just won a batch of Jersey 1977 crowns on eBay (only wanted two, but I was willing to buy the rest) and looking into it, I can only find references to these minted in Silver. I think this must be in accurate, but how can I tell for sure?

 

Also, where would I find the mint mark on a 1976 Eisenhower dollar?

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I don't really know how to tell the difference. The reason I ask is I just won a batch of Jersey 1977 crowns on eBay (only wanted two, but I was willing to buy the rest) and looking into it, I can only find references to these minted in Silver. I think this must be in accurate, but how can I tell for sure?

 

Also, where would I find the mint mark on a 1976 Eisenhower dollar?

Mint mark on Eik dollars is under his neck, just above the date.

As to what is a silver coin. Melt one. :ninja:

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I don't really know how to tell the difference. The reason I ask is I just won a batch of Jersey 1977 crowns on eBay (only wanted two, but I was willing to buy the rest) and looking into it, I can only find references to these minted in Silver. I think this must be in accurate, but how can I tell for sure?

 

Also, where would I find the mint mark on a 1976 Eisenhower dollar?

 

 

Jersey went decimal in 1971 (I believe). I cannot find anything with a value of 1 crown in the 1977 times frame. There is a 1977 Anniversary 25 Pence coin that was minted in both silver and copper-nickel. Silver mintage is low. The silver is 28.80 grams. Don't know the weight of the copper-nickel.

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Jersey went decimal in 1971 (I believe). I cannot find anything with a value of 1 crown in the 1977 times frame. There is a 1977 Anniversary 25 Pence coin that was minted in both silver and copper-nickel. Silver mintage is low. The silver is 28.80 grams. Don't know the weight of the copper-nickel.

 

I can safely assume they are cupronickel then :ninja:

 

The crown lived on past decimalisation, for use in commemorative issues. It retained the same value of 5 shillings as 25 new pence. The crown was redenominated in 1990 to be worth £5. (as in my current icon) ;)

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Lay the coins on your desk and cover them with a tissue. Turn off the lights and shine a flashlight on the coins through the tissue. If they shine white their silver.. any coin that shows up dark is not silver.

 

Ike Dollars: All 40% ikes were minted in San Fransisco.

Mintmark: "S" (for San Francisco, CA) between Eisenhower's head and the date

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Lay the coins on your desk and cover them with a tissue. Turn off the lights and shine a flashlight on the coins through the tissue. If they shine white their silver.. any coin that shows up dark is not silver.

 

Care to add WHY silver coins shine white? :ninja:

 

I'm trying this out as soon as I get home from work today.

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Care to add WHY silver coins shine white? :ninja:

 

I'm trying this out as soon as I get home from work today.

 

I'm not sure _why_. It was in Ken Potter's book and I've been using it ever since. Talked to my local dealer about it and he says he uses it when gets a bag of foreign coins, lol.

 

Works okay.. I think I had too much light last time I tried it because some aluminium coins were shining white also. Helps to double check whatever is showing up white but its a good way to check a handful of coins in one go.

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Since these are not U.S. coins I don't know if this will help, but do they have little bands of copper on the sides? When I count change at work I turn a stack of quarters/dimes sideways to scan quickly (although not always perfectly) to see if I'm giving somebody $3 instead of 30 cents.

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Since these are not U.S. coins I don't know if this will help, but do they have little bands of copper on the sides? When I count change at work I turn a stack of quarters/dimes sideways to scan quickly (although not always perfectly) to see if I'm giving somebody $3 instead of 30 cents.

 

I actually noticed that band on the US coinage. The UK and Euro coins never have this no matter what the alloy. Must have a differing manufacturing process. Anyone know why this is?

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