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The 1908 ten roubles "coin" is back on eBay!


bobh
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The reverse die is clearly not the same but the obverse is not certain.

 

RWJ

The picture of the edge is the same as the one on the web site referred to in the older auction ... mintmaster Apollon Grasgov. The other coin had Felix Zaleman on the edge, if that was indeed a true picture of the "coin" in question.

 

Of course, neither mintmaster is correct for 1908 (should be Elikum Babayants).

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I truely believe this is a different "fake". But I know I have read that rare book...sewn into the cover" before. Must have been a hell of a book.....

 

The seller of the 1908 "coin" previously offered on e-bay, lucianoalan, had given a link to:

 

http://www.imperialrussia.com/goldcoins/19...0goldruble.html

 

to show another known "1908 10 roubles" in existence. That is where the story of the rare book etc... comes from and all the photos match the current listing.

Notice who the new e-bay seller is.

 

Now please tell me that these two sellers do not know each other and are completely innocent of all wrongdoing.

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The seller of the 1908 "coin" previously offered on e-bay, lucianoalan, had given a link to:

 

http://www.imperialrussia.com/goldcoins/19...0goldruble.html

 

to show another known "1908 10 roubles" in existence. That is where the story of the rare book etc... comes from and all the photos match the current listing.

Notice who the new e-bay seller is.

 

Now please tell me that these two sellers do not know each other and are completely innocent of all wrongdoing.

 

Thanks.......I thought I was going nuts with the book story....

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The seller of the 1908 "coin" previously offered on e-bay, lucianoalan, had given a link to:

 

http://www.imperialrussia.com/goldcoins/19...0goldruble.html

 

to show another known "1908 10 roubles" in existence. That is where the story of the rare book etc... comes from and all the photos match the current listing.

Notice who the new e-bay seller is.

 

Now please tell me that these two sellers do not know each other and are completely innocent of all wrongdoing.

Yep ... if you go the "Me" page, that web site is prominently advertised. It's him/them, alright.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello all,

 

Let me start by saying that I am by far a 'coin guy'. I've always enjoyed them and certainly keep my eyes peeled for the elusive 'diamond in the rough'. Which, brings me to reply to this thread. I live in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. As far as I am aware, I was the first to post this coin on E-bay. Here's how the TRUE story went.

 

The coin was posted on a local free website for posting and selling stuff. (this was back in late 2005). I just happened to check the site for latest ads posted and there was an ad for this gold coin. Again, not knowing coins, I thought for $50.00 CDN, I couldn't go wrong buying gold of this size. I arranged to go over to his place to buy the coin. It was him that told me he had bought a box of books at an Auction in Kingston, Ontario. When going through the box, there was an old Russian bible, in rough shape. He found the coin sen in the cover. Is this true? I dunno, but he seemed legit. Much like myself he was a buyer and seller. Anyway, I bought the coin. I was big into selling on e-bay so I tried to search the value of this 1908 10 rouble coin. For abvious reasons, I couldn't find anything. There were similar Roubles going for around 100-150 US. With the US dollar about 30 points greater than the Canuck buck, I decided to post it. Literally, and within the first 10 minutes, I was inindated with e-mails from people. The majority were simply saying it's a fake, but there were 3 that wanted confirmation of certain things on the coin. I had to send more pics to confirm ther coin did say 1908. Now at this time I'm nervous, for 2 reasons.

 

First - what have I done? Did I just post a coin on e-bay with a starting bid of 50.00 and no reserve that could literally be a 'one of a kind'? Did I finally find my 'diamond in the rough' and let it slip away?

 

Secondly - I was afraid that I was going to be dubbed as violating some e-bay policy by posting a counterfeit coin?

 

So, I did two things. I first brought the coin to a guy I know who is a jeweler. He confirmed it was in fact gold. I then brought it to a local coin dealer. Before I showed him, I said 'hey...I have a 1908 gold rouble' how much is it worth? Before I could get the question out, he said I didn't because they didn't strike any in 1908. I told him the story of the bible. He proposed this to me as an explanation. A) It's a counterfeit...but to his point, why would anyone counterfeit a coin for a year when none were made? Logically, it made sense to me. He then said to picture the working conditions in Russia in the early 1900's. Lighting was poor as were conditions. He suggested that maybe it was 1903 and they were setting up the die to strike the coin. With poor lighting, the guy grabs the 8 instead of the 3. The coin gets struck and only then realize their mistake. To avoid getting into trouble, the guy hides it in his bible. Again, it sounded possible.

 

Now, I don't know how much of what I was told was truth, but what I've told you is the 100% truth of the way it happened. Right after talking to the coin guy, I added this info as a possible reason for the coin being a 1908. In the end, I sold it to the highest bidder for $454.00 US. Good profit for paying only $50.00. The felow I sold it to has had it posted with virtually the same details I gave him and I gave you here today.

 

Anyway, I just happened across this blog and thought I would throw it out there. So is the general concensus that this is for certain 100% bogus?

 

Thanks for listening

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He proposed this to me as an explanation. A) It's a counterfeit...but to his point, why would anyone counterfeit a coin for a year when none were made?

Counterfeiters are not always careful and sometimes make careless mistakes.

 

 

He then said to picture the working conditions in Russia in the early 1900's. Lighting was poor as were conditions. He suggested that maybe it was 1903 and they were setting up the die to strike the coin. With poor lighting, the guy grabs the 8 instead of the 3. The coin gets struck and only then realize their mistake. To avoid getting into trouble, the guy hides it in his bible. Again, it sounded possible.

It sounds highly improbable to me. Dies can be repunched to correct errors and this is a trivial matter.

 

Stealing gold coins from the Imperial Mint would result in far more serious trouble than a die-punching error.

 

 

Now, I don't know how much of what I was told was truth, but what I've told you is the 100% truth of the way it happened. Right after talking to the coin guy, I added this info as a possible reason for the coin being a 1908. In the end, I sold it to the highest bidder for $454.00 US. Good profit for paying only $50.00. The felow I sold it to has had it posted with virtually the same details I gave him and I gave you here today.

 

Anyway, I just happened across this blog and thought I would throw it out there. So is the general concensus that this is for certain 100% bogus?

 

Thanks for listening

 

The coin is not consistent with dies used at the mint. Wherever this thing was made, it was almost certainly in someone's basement and not in the Russian mint.

 

It is about as real as the unicorn is.

 

BTW, welcome to coinpeople.

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I first brought the coin to a guy I know who is a jeweler. He confirmed it was in fact gold.

I am guessing that it is probably just gold-plated. Did he weigh the coin? I would be interested to know what it weighs. Also, was it 22K or merely 12K or something else?

 

As to the rest of the story, it should be obvious to anyone who is serious about collecting that it is a fantasy coin and as such of no interest at all. However, it seems that everyone who sells this is trying to pass it off as a genuine product of the Russian Imperial mint, which it isn't by any stretch of the imagination. Why not put it up on eBay as a souvenir piece or copy? That would be the honest thing to do.

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Counterfeiters are not always careful and sometimes make careless mistakes.

It sounds highly improbable to me. Dies can be repunched to correct errors and this is a trivial matter.

 

Stealing gold coins from the Imperial Mint would result in far more serious trouble than a die-punching error.

The coin is not consistent with dies used at the mint. Wherever this thing was made, it was almost certainly in someone's basement and not in the Russian mint.

 

It is about as real as the unicorn is.

 

BTW, welcome to coinpeople.

 

Thanks for the welcome to this site. Very informative.

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