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US Bank Notes Life Expectancy in Circulation


Nightwing
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Sorry if this is a duplicate post, but I could not find an answer in my search.

 

What is the life expectancy for each of the US bills in circulation ($1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100) and does the US Treasury actively remove worn currency from circulation or does this duty really fall more so on the banks and other financial institutions?

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The average life spans are as follows:

 

Denomination Life Span

 

$ 1 ...............21 months

$ 5 ...............16 months

$ 10 .............18 months

$ 20 .............24 months

$ 50 .............55 months

$100 ............89 months

 

All currency in circulation is routinely deposited to Federal Reserve Banks by commercial banks. Worn notes are systematically destroyed by Federal Reserve Banks during ordinary currency processing. The destroyed notes are replaced by new currency provided by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

 

Source: Bureau of Engraving & Printing, US Secret Service

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The average life spans are as follows:

 

Denomination Life Span

 

$ 1 ...............21 months

$ 5 ...............16 months

$ 10 .............18 months

$ 20 .............24 months

$ 50 .............55 months

$100 ............89 months

 

All currency in circulation is routinely deposited to Federal Reserve Banks by commercial banks. Worn notes are systematically destroyed by Federal Reserve Banks during ordinary currency processing. The destroyed notes are replaced by new currency provided by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

 

Source: Bureau of Engraving & Printing, US Secret Service

 

Thanks, just what I was interested in knowing!

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I figured the $20 would have the lowest life expectancy because it has the highest circulation rate. I'm also surprised that the $100 doesn't circulate more than the $50.

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I figured the $20 would have the lowest life expectancy because it has the highest circulation rate. I'm also surprised that the $100 doesn't circulate more than the $50.

 

I think credit cards have probably helped move people away from the $100 bill, just my logical guess though.

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I find more old one dollar bills than anything else at work, MANY from before 1995, but rarely are they in decent condition. In fact I think I find more circ barr notes than 1993 series!

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