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1913 Romanov tercentenary rouble from China


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This is most puzzling to me. This is a fairly common coin, why bother paying all this money to a seller with rating of 7, from China! Even without looking at the item I would estimate my odds of receiving anything as somewhat meager. I've been ebaying since 2001. I remember people were not eager to buy even from local sellers with low ratings - especially when their merchandise looked to good to be true. What happened?

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The seller of the following 1913 commemorative rouble has two other Russian fakes for sale

and it is likely that this piece is also bad:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...em=200184596844

 

RWJ

I have heard that there are fakes of this coin out there, but I never saw one except for the silver-plated copper coin which was offered in a recent UBS auction (it didn't sell, BTW).

 

Perhaps this is a genuine coin, but there are certainly better ones for this kind of money -- and $25 shipping charges is a lot! It looks like a circulated coin which was soaked overnight in some harsh agent and then scrubbed with a Brillo pad. :ninja:

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I have heard that there are fakes of this coin out there, but I never saw one except for the silver-plated copper coin which was offered in a recent UBS auction (it didn't sell, BTW).

 

Perhaps this is a genuine coin, but there are certainly better ones for this kind of money -- and $25 shipping charges is a lot! It looks like a circulated coin which was soaked overnight in some harsh agent and then scrubbed with a Brillo pad. :ninja:

 

Even if this coin is genuine, it's still an ugly example of a common coin which can easily be found in XF or better.

 

I agree with alexbq2. Even if the coin is genuine (which I doubt), there seems to be little reason to buy over the net from a relatively poorly known source in China.

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If it is a fake, I see it as a test to see what people would bid even for common coins - even in China, 1 yuan coins are counterfeited which is a mere 12 US cents. Anything else above that is extremely profitable. :ninja:

 

 

Sold for $70. Very respectable! Funny part is that the seller entered this information: "Exact Year: 1749 "

 

I guess he usually sells the 1749 fakes.

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ebay #230204860612

 

listing is worth checking out for entertainment value alone.

This one looks a lot like the 1913 silver-plated commem that was offered in a recent UBS auction. It even had decent-looking edge lettering!

 

I suppose the piece might have historical (as well as hysterical :ninja: ) interest, if it was indeed a contemporary fake.

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