Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

The 2008 Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin Program


Recommended Posts

I haven't heard much about these; are they going to be medals or will they be circulating?

 

Love the first two, but the third doesn't look very coin-y.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know about anyone else, but I think the first design the birds look more like chicken hawks than proud eagles.

I do like the reverse of the first one, mostly because it is a familiar design.

The second coin... the front is great, but the back looks more like the bird's head is exploding.

The third view.. everyone likes babies. These, however, look a bit vulnerable without a parent watching over them.

The other side of the third view is okay... not great.

So, I chose the back of number one, and the other side is still up for grabs.

 

Just my opinion.

 

Corky

Link to post
Share on other sites

I rather like the third coin. The chicks do look vulnerable, just like any young creature would. A parent to watch over them? That can be me. The first one is rather fetching as well, but the second one just looks unbalanced. I'd prefer to see the flying eagle on the front centered, rather than so far down.

 

I think the pieces look more like medals than coins, for the main.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a new commorative coin program coming in 2008 from the United States mint. Below is the text from the mint's website. At the very bottom I've provided the link.

 

The 2008 Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin Program

The Bald Eagle, nearing the brink of extinction just 35 years ago, has made remarkable progress and is still expanding its presence throughout our Nation's lands and skies. Public Law 108-486, signed by President George W. Bush on December 23, 2004, calls for the United States Mint to mint and issue three commemorative coins that celebrate the encouraging recovery of the Bald Eagle species, the 35th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and the removal of the Bald Eagle from the Endangered Species List.

 

In 1792, the Second Continental Congress selected the Bald Eagle as our National Emblem of the United States and made it the centerpiece of the Great Seal of the United States. The majestic Bald Eagle has come to symbolize America's freedom, strength and democracy.

 

Bald Eagles were once abundant throughout our Nation. But poaching, habitat destruction, pesticides, and food source contamination took their toll, reducing the population from approximately 100,000 nesting pairs at the founding of our Nation to just over 400 nesting pairs in the early 1960's.

 

The path to recovery took the efforts of governments, private organizations, and citizens determined to save our National emblem. The ban on the use of certain pesticides in 1972, the protections provided under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and efforts such as captive breeding and nest watch programs, provided the vital protection that the Bald Eagles needed to survive. The success of this recovery effort culminated in the removal of the Bald Eagle from the Endangered Species List in 2007. About 10,000 nesting pairs of Bald Eagles can now be found throughout the continental United States.

 

The Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin Program consists of three coins – a $5 gold coin, a silver dollar, and a half-dollar clad coin – available in both proof and uncirculated conditions. Surcharges from the program are authorized to be paid to the American Eagle Foundation of Tennessee for the purposes of continuing its work to save and protect Bald Eagles nationally.

 

The maximum mintages across all product options for these commemorative coins are limited to 100,000 for the $5 gold coin, 500,000 for the silver dollar, and 750,000 for the half-dollar.

 

Bald Eagle $5 Gold Coins

 

Weight: 8.359 grams nominal

Diameter: 0.850 inches (± 0.003 inches)

Composition: 90% gold, 10% alloy

Mintage Limit: 100,000 (across all product options)

 

Bald Eagle Silver Dollars

 

Weight: 26.730 grams nominal

Diameter: 1.500 inches (± 0.003 inches)

Composition: 90% silver, 10% alloy

Mintage Limit: 500,000 (across all product options)

 

Bald Eagle Half-dollars

 

Weight: 11.340 grams (± 0.454)

Diameter: 1.205 inches (± 0.002 inches)

Composition: 8.33% nickel, balance copper

Mintage Limit: 750,000 (across all product options)

 

Taken from http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/commem...ction=BaldEagle

Link to post
Share on other sites

A little more info from the US Mint's website, some of this is a duplicate from above, but it does mention the artists.

 

United States Mint Unveils Designs for 2008 American Bald Eagle Recovery and National Emblem Commemorative Coins

Designs Honor Preservation of the Nation’s Emblem of Freedom and Democracy

 

WASHINGTON - The United States Mint released today the coin designs for the 2008 American Bald Eagle Recovery and National Emblem Commemorative Coin Program. Public Law 108-486, the American Bald Eagle Recovery and National Emblem Commemorative Coin Act, authorizes the United States Mint to mint and issue three commemorative coins in honor of the recovery of the Bald Eagle species, the 35th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, and the Bald Eagle's importance as a national symbol.

 

The United States Mint will mint and issue proof and uncirculated versions of the Bald Eagle Coins in a $5 gold coin, a $1 silver coin, and a half-dollar clad coin. The obverse of the $5 gold coin was designed by Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) Master Designer Susan Gamble and sculpted by United States Mint Medallic Sculptor Phebe Hemphill. The design depicts young eaglets perched on a branch in their natural habitat. The coin's reverse, sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart, depicts an image of the current Great Seal of the United States as engraved in 1903.

 

The obverse of the $1 silver coin, designed by AIP Master Designer Joel Iskowitz and sculpted by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart, depicts a mature eagle soaring majestically through the sky. The coin's reverse, sculpted by United States Mint Medallic Sculptor Jim Licaretz, is based on a replica of the first Great Seal of the United States used between 1782 and 1841.

 

The obverse of the half-dollar clad coin, designed by Susan Gamble and executed by United States Mint Medallic Sculptor Joseph Menna, depicts baby eaglets at about two to three days old, settled in a nest with an unhatched egg. AIP Associate Designer Donna Weaver designed the coin's obverse, which features the legendary Bald Eagle "Challenger" with the American flag in the background. The design was executed by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Charles Vickers.

 

Mintage across each product option is limited to 100,000 for the $5 gold coin, 500,000 for the $1 silver coin and 750,000 for the clad half-dollar. Surcharges collected from 2008 American Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin Program sales, expected to begin on January 15, 2008, are authorized to be paid to the American Eagle Foundation of Tennessee to continue its works.

 

The Bald Eagle, unique to North America, was designated America's national emblem by the Founding Fathers on June 20, 1782, at the Second Continental Congress. Once threatened with possible extinction in the lower 48 states, the Bald Eagle was classified as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Because of the success of numerous concerted recovery efforts, the Bald Eagle was removed from the Endangered Species List in 2007.

 

To view and download images of the Bald Eagle designs, see http://www.usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?...o#2008BaldEagle.

 

Contact: Press inquiries: Michael White (202) 354-7222

Customer Service information: (800) USA MINT (872-6468)

 

Link to article: http://usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?acti...ease&ID=851

Link to post
Share on other sites

A parent to watch over them? That can be me.

 

I think you would be a really good baby eagle mom. I am wondering about the third eagle still in the shell.

Guess I worry a bit much about the little ones. Comes with being a mom and grandmom.

I am with you about the medal thing. Can't believe these would ever be in circulation.

Maybe they will look better after they are minted?

 

Corky

Link to post
Share on other sites

NightWing, in your first informative post, it states the composition of the dollar coin as being 90% gold. Is this really supposed to be 90% silver? I'm just curious. I'm hoping it will be silver so it can go on my wish list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just think its so weird that I didn't hear about these til December of 2007 when I've already been hearing about 2009 Lincoln designs and post statehood quarter designs for years.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I just think its so weird that I didn't hear about these til December of 2007 when I've already been hearing about 2009 Lincoln designs and post statehood quarter designs for years.

 

Umm, what have you heard about post-statehood quarter designs?

Link to post
Share on other sites
The second coin... the front is great, but the back looks more like the bird's head is exploding.

 

How dare you sir, how dare you?

 

That is the original great seal of the United States.

 

greatseal.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
NightWing, in your first informative post, it states the composition of the dollar coin as being 90% gold. Is this really supposed to be 90% silver? I'm just curious. I'm hoping it will be silver so it can go on my wish list.

 

 

Good question. I would assume that is a typo as well, not on my part of course. :ninja: I guess we'll have to wait and see. I'd imagine these will appear shortly after the new year when the Little Rock and Jamestown commemorative coins go away. (Which by the way is today, December 14th, 2007.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
NightWing, in your first informative post, it states the composition of the dollar coin as being 90% gold. Is this really supposed to be 90% silver? I'm just curious. I'm hoping it will be silver so it can go on my wish list.

The US Mint corrected this on their website and I have corrected this info above.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*It may be easier to view the prices and quantities on the US Mint's actual web page, link at the bottom of article.

 

Bald Eagle Commemorative Coins Available January 15

 

 

WASHINGTON - The United States Mint will begin accepting orders for the Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin Program at 12 Noon (ET) on January 15, 2008.

 

Surcharges collected from the sale of Bald Eagle Commemorative Coins are authorized to be paid to the American Eagle Foundation of Tennessee to further its work.

 

The Bald Eagle Commemorative Coins will be available in six individual coin options: a $5 gold coin, a silver dollar coin, and a half-dollar clad coin each available in proof and uncirculated versions. Also available will be a Three-Coin Proof Set, a Coin and Medal Set, and a Young Collector's Set. Additionally, later this year, the annual United States Mint American Legacy CollectionTM will feature a Bald Eagle Proof Silver Dollar.

 

The maximum mintage across all Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin options, including sets, is limited to 100,000 $5 gold coins, 500,000 silver dollar coins and 750,000 clad half-dollars. Household order limits will be in effect for the first 30 days for most products. Each product description includes information on that product's production and household limits.

 

Orders will be limited to 100 units per household for each of the individual proof and uncirculated coin options. Each of these six individual options comes with a Certificate of Authenticity and is packaged in a custom box with the program name.

 

Orders for the Bald Eagle Three-Coin Proof Set, which features one proof each of the $5 gold coin, the silver dollar coin and the clad half-dollar, will be limited to one per household. The coins are displayed in a custom presentation box containing a Certificate of Authenticity. This special set is limited to 25,000 units.

 

The Bald Eagle Coin and Medal Set features an uncirculated Bald Eagle Silver Dollar and bronze Bald Eagle Medal from the National Wildlife Refuge System Centennial Medal Series. The set highlights the journey of the Bald Eagle from near extinction to its recent removal from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. The Coin and Medal Set is limited to 50,000 units with a limit of five units per household.

 

The Bald Eagle Young Collector's Set, an option especially designed for children, features the uncirculated Bald Eagle Half-Dollar. This fun and educational option marks the return of the popular "Mint Kids" with a new adventure that teaches children about the recovery and restoration of our national emblem. Production of the Young Collector's Set will be based on the quantity of units ordered during the specified ordering period from January 15, 2008, to April 15, 2008.

 

Pricing and product limits for the Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin options are as follows:

 

Option Introductory Price Regular Price Household Limit/Product Limit

 

Proof $5 Gold Coin (EA1) $294.95 $319.95 100/NA

 

Uncirculated $5 Gold Coin (EA2) $284.95 $309.95 100/NA

 

Proof Silver Dollar (EA3) $39.95 $43.95 100/NA

 

Uncirculated Silver Dollar (EA4) $35.95 $37.95 100/NA

 

Proof Clad Half-Dollar (EA5) $9.95 $10.95 100/NA

 

Uncirculated Clad Half-Dollar (EA6) $7.95 $8.95 100/NA

 

Three-Coin Proof Set (EA7) N/A $369.95 One/25,000

 

Young Collector's Set (EA8) N/A $14.95 NA/Open Ordering Period Only

 

Coin and Medal Set (EA9) N/A $44.95 Five/50,000

 

Customers should be aware that two products were erroneously priced in the mail brochure. They are the Young Collector's Set and the Coin and Medal Set. However, the order form on the brochure is correct, and the insert that is provided explains the error.

 

The introductory sales period will end at 5:00 p.m. (ET) on February 14, 2008. Additionally, the Young Collector's Set will be available for purchase for a 90-day period ending on April 15.

 

The United States Mint will accept orders for the Bald Eagle Commemorative Coin options at its secure web site, www.usmint.gov, or at the toll-free number, 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing- and speech-impaired customers with TTY equipment may place their orders by calling 1-888-321-MINT (6468) 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (ET), Monday through Friday.

 

If paying by credit card, customers should ensure that their credit card information remains current to avoid order processing delays. Orders placed with credit cards that expire before an order is shipped will be cancelled. To update credit card information after an order has been placed, customers should call 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468).

 

Note: To ensure that all members of the public have fair and equal access to United States Mint products, any order placed prior to the official on-sale date and time, January 15, 12:00 Noon (ET), shall not be deemed accepted by the United States Mint and will not be honored.

 

 

 

Contact: Press inquiries: Michael White (202) 354-7222

Customer Service information: (800) USA MINT (872-6468)

 

Taken from: http://usmint.gov/pressroom/index.cfm?acti...ease&ID=858

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's numismatic value prices, but from a PM standpoint, those prices are quite high for .900 purity.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I know it's numismatic value prices, but from a PM standpoint, those prices are quite high for .900 purity.

I was a little surprised that one can get something for around $10 from this series (before shipping of course).

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...