Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

New euro coin map excludes Turkey


akdrv
 Share

Recommended Posts

European Union officials have been accused of "political geography" after Turkey, but not the Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova, disappeared from a map of Europe designed for new euro coins.

 

A common design for the "tails side" of euro coins is to be rolled out in 2008 with an updated graphic showing an enlarged EU and new countries, such as Cyprus, that are joining the single currency.

 

Papers given to Euro-MPs under Brussels open information rules show that the European Commission proposed a standard format map of Europe extending as far as the Caspian Sea and including Turkey.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml...25/weuro125.xml

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
A common design for the "tails side" of euro coins is to be rolled out in 2008 with an updated graphic showing an enlarged EU and new countries, such as Cyprus, that are joining the single currency.

Oh dear. Yet another new design? Or might that UK newspaper just not have noticed that these coins have been circulating in Euroland for several months? :ninja:

 

Hint: Most euro area member states started making and issuing them this year; the remaining few will follow next year. But since these coins circulate in the entire currency union, the "new maps" are already in use even in countries (such as Austria or Italy) where the national mint has not switched over yet.

 

And no, the new designs do not show "the enlarged EU". They show Europe, geographically, pretty much like the euro notes. And I find it peculiar, to put it mildly, that "leaving out" Turkey has become an issue for some media while "leaving out" Iceland is apparently so acceptable that it is not even mentioned.

 

Even funnier, by the way, is that numismaster.com warmed that September story up just a few days ago, without adding any new information or corrections. Oh well, that is the same site which, in an article dated Nov 16 (yesterday) about €2 counterfeits, wrote that a €2 coin is "worth a little more than $2 (U.S.) on the current exchange rate". Hmm, €2.00 is something like $2.93 ... What does "current" mean again? ;)

 

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Moving" Cyprus is something I would have to see to make a judgment call on.

Just have a look at any Treaty of Rome commem, or at the coins (10 ct to €2) issued by Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain this year. :ninja: In case you don't have any of those at hand, look here: http://www.ecb.europa.eu/bc/euro/coins/com...l/index.en.html

 

Wikipedia also has some nice large images such as ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:50eurocent%28neu%29.jpg (50 cent new)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:2_euro_coins.png (2 euro new)

 

Again, it is surprising that "moving Cyprus" is criticized by two MEPs, and echoed by some papers, while the position of the Canary Islands (with is not "correct" with regard to mainland Europe on both the old and the new pieces) seems to be fine in their view. Honni soit qui mal y pense.

 

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And no, the new designs do not show "the enlarged EU". They show Europe, geographically, pretty much like the euro notes. And I find it peculiar, to put it mildly, that "leaving out" Turkey has become an issue for some media while "leaving out" Iceland is apparently so acceptable that it is not even mentioned.

 

Christian

 

Iceland is a member of EFTA, and only has about a 1/4 million citizens. Their brief claim to the world media was when Reagan met Gorby there in Reykjavik in 1986 for their first summit. They have also fought brief little fishing wars with Britain. Other than that they stay out of the news.

 

Back to numismatics, Iceland had what is arguably one of the worlds best commemoratives, struck for the 1000th anniversary of the Althing in 1930.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just have a look at any Treaty of Rome commem, or at the coins (10 ct to €2) issued by Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain this year. :ninja: In case you don't have any of those at hand, look here: http://www.ecb.europa.eu/bc/euro/coins/com...l/index.en.html

 

Wikipedia also has some nice large images such as ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:50eurocent%28neu%29.jpg (50 cent new)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:2_euro_coins.png (2 euro new)

 

Again, it is surprising that "moving Cyprus" is criticized by two MEPs, and echoed by some papers, while the position of the Canary Islands (with is not "correct" with regard to mainland Europe on both the old and the new pieces) seems to be fine in their view. Honni soit qui mal y pense.

 

Christian

 

I am looking at one right now. I see the move, for Cyprus. I see the what you mean related to the Canaries.

 

The Turkey thing is a different issue of course. KurtS the Kurd issue will never go away.

 

 

Ciao,

AWACS

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Other than that they stay out of the news.

Ha, Björk is from Iceland too. :ninja: What is interesting about the country with regard to the euro is that, from time to time, you read about suggestions to introduce the € there. The current government is not interested in EU membership; like Norway, Iceland is a member of the European Economic Area (and of "Schengenland") but not of the European Union. On the other hand, there are concerns about the volatility of a "small currency" like the Icelandic Krona, so once in a while the idea comes up. Last time I read about that was early this year though.

 

As for those 1930 commems, according to the Schön catalog, those three were "medals with the option to be declared legal tender" - which so far has not happened, it seems. But yes, very interesting pieces ...

 

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for those 1930 commems, according to the Schön catalog, those three were "medals with the option to be declared legal tender" - which so far has not happened, it seems. But yes, very interesting pieces ...

 

Christian

 

 

The 1930 commems were struck by the Sachsen state mint in Dresden, if memory serves correct. Maybe it would be more proper to describe them as medallic issues along the lines of the Hindenburg commems in late 1920's Germany.

 

At any rate with Turkey's volatile political scene, I think it will be quite some time, if at all, before Turkey would be invited to join the EU. The Bush admin pushed it for awhile, but now relations with Turkey are damaged over the 1915 Genocide Resolution going through the US Congress, and Turkey interfering in Iraq. And Sarkozy loves Bush and the USA. Oh what a strange world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

1; 2 and 5 eurocent common side still shows tha map where Eastern border of EU lies between Germany and Poland.

Thus Slovenia strucks coins showing it outside EU. Funny...

 

The other question: Does anybody knows how often national sides can be changed? If those where monarch dies may, I don't believe others may not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1; 2 and 5 eurocent common side still shows tha map where Eastern border of EU lies between Germany and Poland.

Thus Slovenia strucks coins showing it outside EU. Funny...

Guess what, back when the agreement regarding the new designs was published, yours truly sent this e-mail message to the Council's press office:

 

Subject: 2666th Economic and Financial Affairs Council meeting - Luxembourg, 7 June 2005

Dear Sir or Madam,

according to a press release published by the Council today (Council conclusions - Change to the common sides of the euro circulation coins),

"The common side of the smallest denomination coins (1-, 2- and 5-cent) represent Europe in the world and are not affected by the enlargement of the European Union."

This is, as far as I can tell, not quite correct: These three denominations do show Europe in the world, but with the 15 member states (of the European Union before May 2004) raised or highlighted.

Kind regards, (...)

 

Got a reply back which said:

Thank you for pointing this out. I will forward to the relevant department.

Regards (...)

 

Well, that was it. Apparently the Council never really had a close look at those coins - contrary to us collectors. :ninja:

 

The other question: Does anybody knows how often national sides can be changed? If those where monarch dies may, I don't believe others may not.

The initial moratorium still applies; it basically says that the country specific sides should not be modified until the end of 2008. As you mentioned, that does not apply to coins depicting a royal effigy or monogram.

 

Then there is the May 2005 agreement which says that all newly designed national sides should include the country name (full or abbreviated version). Now Finland did not actually modify its designs, but the Finnish circulation coins issued this year all have a little "FI" on the obverse ...

 

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...