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YeOldeCollector's Olde Purchases


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Great strike and design. Are these for your collection?

 

 

George, they are indeed nice examples. All of the coins here are for my personal collection, I think I'd struggle to part with these.

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Kingston.jpg

 

All from the York fair. An Edward I penny of the scarce Kingston-upon-Hull mint.

 

 

Hertford.jpg

 

A Cnut shortcross penny of Hertford mint, with the moneyer being Leofric.

 

 

Alfred-1.jpg

 

A Danish East Anglian imitation of an Alfred the Great penny. Nice and scarce, moneyer Cuthbert.

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One of the latest additions to my collection:

 

11586136.jpg

 

 

 

William II (1087-1100), Penny, 1.36g, voided cross type, London, Brunic, crowned facing bust, star each side, rev. brvnic on lvn, voided short cross, arms extending from central cross over cross terminating in annulets. Very rare, especially in such condition.

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Congrats, YOC. I don't recall seeing many double cross coins (meaning... the "cross terminating in annulets". I'm not calling the "voided cross" two crosses)

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I took some photos myself of the William II:

 

William1-1.jpg

William2-1.jpg

 

 

Also, here is a Cnut penny that I've recently acquired:

 

Cnut1-3.jpg

Cnut2-3.jpg

 

Quatrefoil issue, Edpine on Thetford with a small cross-pattee behind the bust.

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Henry III Penny of Ireland, hence the triangle encompassing the portrait. Ricard on Dive, being Dublin mint. Type IV with single line to triangle, no pellets in obverse legend and crow fleur separated from the band.

 

DSCF9824.jpg

DSCF9826.jpg

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Great coins as always Clive & your photos are amazing :bthumbsup:

 

 

Thank you, Pat. I hope to add more to my collection over the summer - material permitting. :lol:

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YeOldeCollector, how do you take those photos? What does your set-up look like? Your photos have a lot of depth, color, and still show the coin in what appears to be completely natural lighting, without any added effects.

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YeOldeCollector, how do you take those photos? What does your set-up look like? Your photos have a lot of depth, color, and still show the coin in what appears to be completely natural lighting, without any added effects.

 

A very good question! I don't have much of a set-up. All photos are taken in the natural English sunlight (what little there is... :rolleyes: )

 

Most of them are taken in a photo-tent, a lot like this minus the lights and top. I situate it by a large window that's south-facing and then use my Fuji S200EXR to shoot them. It's a simple set-up and it works for the coins, usually. I hope that you like them. :)

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Henry1-1.jpg

Henry2-1.jpg

 

Henry III Voided Longcross penny. Class II. Nicole on London.

 

 

Bristol1-4.jpg

Bristol2-4.jpg

 

Edward I penny. Bristol mint. One of the fullest flans I've seen in a while.

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Something a bit different.

 

Strap1.jpg

Strap2.jpg

 

A strap end is a small piece of copper-alloy designed to finish the end of a strap, normally made of leather. This particular one is gilded and has a fantastic representation of three lions passant guardant which was first used as the Royal Arms of Richard I. This particular strap end dates to around 1250-1350 and is in stunning condition as few are gilded and even fewer retain their gilding.

 

Here are the arms in question:

 

500px-Royal_Arms_of_England_%281198-1340%29.svg.png

 

Just a little something to fit in with my era of coinage.

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Very nice Clive. Is there a significance to the guilding? Only certain people had it done? Or indicated rank? Or?

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Very nice Clive. Is there a significance to the guilding? Only certain people had it done? Or indicated rank? Or?

 

A very good question, Art. Gilding is a difficult process and to do it 700 or 800 years ago must have been even more difficult making me think that only the wealthy and important would have had such a status symbol. With the royal arms too it makes me believe that this could have belonged to a knight as they directly represented the king, or at least someone with a royal duty or connection as this is a piece of jewellery in its own right.

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