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Thank you gentlemen. :ninja:

 

I guess that Norwich is one of the rarer mints of the period?

 

Norwich is certainly one of the less-common mints of the period. I've got a complete mint run for this period, I've just got to upgrade it to an all-VF set.

 

The really rare mints are Shrewsbury, Ilchester, Wallingford, Wilton, Carlisle, Hereford and Durham. Then there are the scarce ones such as Lincoln, Exeter, Oxford, Norwich and Northampton. Then we move on to the slightly more common ones such as Bristol and Newcastle until we get to the common ones of London, Bury Saint Edmunds, Canterbury, Winchester and York.

 

 

 

Here is one of my Durham pennies:

 

Durham1.jpg

Durham2.jpg

 

 

Whereas Shrewsbury is also very hard to come by:

 

46572Shrews1.jpg

1667Shrews2.jpg

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I like that Shrewsbury penny, there is something a bit different about it compared to many of the other voided long cross pennies ive seen.

 

I managed to pick up one of the class 3bc listed in North not too long ago with the pellet after REX, I have no clue how much more they are worth than the common ones though.

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JamesI1.jpg

JamesI2.jpg

 

James I copper farthing, dating to 1613-1615.

 

Harrington Farthing, type 2. Mint mark cinquefoil on reverse only. Absolutely stunning coin, as-struck albeit green, one of the best I've seen. Spink 2676.

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Great coins Clive. Keep showing us those beauties. Perhaps I'll win the lotto someday and get into hammereds.

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An Edward I penny arrived today. Second issue, Ib, Dublin mint. Dates to about 1285.

 

EdIDublin1.jpg

EdIDublin2.jpg

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Cool Eddy, Clive. Two questions: A UK coin from Dublin? Why the upside down triangle?

 

 

Thanks, George.

 

Edward I was ruler of Ireland because he inherited the title Lord of Ireland which came with the English crown, so was entitled to mint coins as it was perceived to be part of his kingdom.

 

You will find this to be useful background knowledge: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lordship...eland,_1300.png

 

The upside down triangle is purely to differentiate these from his English issues.

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Many thanks gentlemen. Here are a couple more I received recently.

 

EdIYork1.jpg

EdIYork2.jpg

 

Edward I Penny of York. Class 9b2. I just like the portrait and toning.

 

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EdVI1-1.jpg

EdVI2-1.jpg

EdVI3-1.jpg

 

Edward VI Shilling. Tun mint mark. Again, I fell for the portrait...

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You collect such wonderful coins. They are truly beautiful pieces of history. Let's take the Edward I York penny. For how many years would a coin like that have actually circulated? How does it come to be available and still in such condition? Were there collections or hoards that have caused the safe storage of these items?

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Thank you gentlemen, I am glad that you like the coins.

 

 

 

You collect such wonderful coins. They are truly beautiful pieces of history. Let's take the Edward I York penny. For how many years would a coin like that have actually circulated? How does it come to be available and still in such condition? Were there collections or hoards that have caused the safe storage of these items?

 

A coin like that could have circulated for about fifty years or so. Many, many coins were dropped as individuals and you can imagine how hard it would have been to keep coins on your person on those days when pockets were probably things of the future. Many people kept coins in their mouths as they could not afford leather purses, otherwise people held them in their hands and dropped a couple on their way to market.

 

A metal detectorist comes along in this day & age and finds several coins and artefacts in an acre field. Freshly-ploughed soil can bring these pennies to the surface and that is how they then fall into the hands of people like me. Coins like these...

 

NicLvn1.jpg

NicLvn2.jpg

 

...are often part of hoards. Some hoards consist of thousands of coins with many having been deposited soon after being struck, hence their 'as-struck' condition. At this time, collections would not have been about as the first coin collectors tend to appear in the 16th and 17th centuries with them really becoming prominent in the 18th and 19th centuries.

 

But yes, I'm biased and will agree that they are wonderful coins. There is so much history attached to one piece and the quality of workmanship for each piece is amazing.

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I've got plenty of coins to show you all, but need to take photographs first. I managed to snag this tonight, here are the seller's photographs.

 

 

Sceat1-1.jpg

Sceat2-1.jpg

 

It's an Anglo-Saxon Secondary sceat, series J, type 37. A pair of opposed faces with a cross dividing. The reverse features four stylised birds around a cross. This coin dates to about 740 A.D. and appears to be in fantastic condition.

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HenryIII1-1.jpg

HenryIII2-1.jpg

 

Henry III Longcross Penny. Nicole on London. Interesting portrait, Class 3c.

 

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EdI1.jpg

EdI2.jpg

 

Edward I Penny. London mint. Class 8c.

 

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Mary1.jpg

Mary2.jpg

 

Mary Groat. A metal flow line on obverse but one of the best reverses I've seen.

 

 

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LizGroat2-1.jpg

LizGroat1-1.jpg

 

Elizabeth I Halfgroat. Second Issue, 1560-1. Superb coin, much better in-hand.

 

 

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JamesIHG2.jpg

JamesIHG1.jpg

 

James I Halfgroat. Second coinage. Very sharp detail.

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Such tiny fingers!

 

The last one looks like it has a pineapple. On American coins, I'd understand the motif, but not on that one. Thanks for sharing!

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I'll try again. Sunflower?

 

Not quite :ninja:

 

Such tiny fingers!

 

More like such tiny coins ;)

 

The last one looks like it has a pineapple. On American coins, I'd understand the motif, but not on that one. Thanks for sharing!

 

The last coin features a crowned thistle, the emblem of Scotland as James I was also James VI of Scotland.

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