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YeOldeCollector's Olde Purchases


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  • 3 weeks later...
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Well, after this long journey:

 

Map.jpg

 

I returned home to find this waiting for me:

 

Burgred1-1.jpg

Burgred2.jpg

 

The king is Burgred of Mercia who ruled from 852 until 874. This is of the Lunette issue and of type D with lines instead of proper lunettes. The moneyer can be read as Dudwine as the legend reads MON DVDPNE ETA meaning Moneta Dudpne.

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Neat medals and a wonderful coin. Great journey too. Remember today's pain-in-the-butt can often be tomorrow's great adventure.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Great coin Clive, im jelous!

 

Thanks Mat, I have a penchant for these earlier pennies. :ninja:

 

 

Neat medals and a wonderful coin. Great journey too. Remember today's pain-in-the-butt can often be tomorrow's great adventure.

 

Cheers Art. Yes, I really did enjoy that journey, such an experience.

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james1-62.jpg

James4.jpg

james2-62.jpg

James5.jpg

 

 

James I Halfgroat, scarcer issue with portrait. Stunning condition, much better in hand. Of James' First Coinage, dating this piece to either 1603 or 1604.

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Very nice little coin Clive, I also really like the Irish Henry III you posted in the medieval coins category. Ive got a nice litte James I half groat and also a penny, I will have to post them somewhere.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Henry II Shortcross Penny. Minted by Ravl at the scarce mint of Northampton. Brilliant condition for this issue, much better in hand. Strangely well-centred and slightly double-struck on the right side of the obverse. Class 1c.

 

North1.jpg

North2.jpg

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Top drawer stuff.
Lovely coin, I do like the shortcross pennies

 

Thank you gentlemen. :ninja:

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Ed1-1.jpg

Ed2-1.jpg

 

Edward I Penny, Class 1c of London dating to 1279. Absolutely superb portrait, it looks amazing in hand. I like hammered errors and so am pleased with this purchase, an interesting double-strike.

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Why is part of the strike on the obverse flat?

 

 

Good question. :ninja:

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Why is part of the strike on the obverse flat?

 

That is a very good question George. It will always be a mystery but one can always assume.

 

Perhaps, as the flan was not placed correctly upon the lower die, that that flat part was exposed to the surrounding, blank part of the die. So when the force of the hammer came into contact with the coin, it erased all detail on that part. This would explain the slight curling and blankness that is visible on the reverse too.

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Forgery1.jpg

Forgery2.jpg

 

This is an interesting piece. It's not silver but it is old and has all of the correct details of a normal coin. I, personally, believe this to be a contemporary forgery of a halfgroat of Henry VII, from circa 1490.

 

The portrait is a real give-away as the neck does not conform to the standard style and the face is far too basic, a bit like a play-doh face. The legend reads true but the coin is exceptionally lightweight and thin, neither does it ring true.

 

However, I think that this is a skillful forgery and if the forger was caught, I should imagine that the punishment would have been death. Very rare but not nice to look at.

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That is a very good question George. It will always be a mystery but one can always assume.

 

Perhaps, as the flan was not placed correctly upon the lower die, that that flat part was exposed to the surrounding, blank part of the die. So when the force of the hammer came into contact with the coin, it erased all detail on that part. This would explain the slight curling and blankness that is visible on the reverse too.

 

Thanks! That's what I thought!

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Thanks! That's what I thought!

 

However, to helpfully aid the confusion, this coin appears to have been struck three times... :ninja:

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An apprentice??

 

Possibly, but if that was the case, surely it wouldn't have seen circulation and clipping.

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Maybe it wasn't suppose to circulate. Either that or a poor fake??

 

An apprentice's coins would either be melted down if silver or discarded if not precious metal. This coin is not of silver and so if it was minted by an apprentice I struggle to see how it managed to see circulation.

 

That's what I'm trying to say, this is most likely an exceptionally well done forgery of the time. It is certainly not a poor fake if it is a fake.

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Norw1.jpg

Norw2.jpg

 

Henry III Voided Longcross penny. Jacob on Norwich, (IAC OBO NN ORW). Class 3b.

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