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Æþelræd Unræd Longcross Penny of Lewes mint.

 

Aethelred II, otherwise known as Ethelred II or the Unrede/Unready, ruled from around 979 until 1013 and then 1014 until 1016. Coins like these were used as Danegeld and an example of it in Aethelred's reign was after the Battle of Maldon where Aethelred made a payment of 3,300 kg of silver to the Vikings. Danegeld was essentially the money used to pay off the invading Vikings and vast quantities of it was used. In 1007 Aethelred gave 13,400 kg of silver and then 17,900 kg in 1012. This is why there are more Anglo-Saxon pennies of this reign found in Scandinavia rather than England as the coins were often used for Danegeld. It is estimated that more than sixty million pennies were paid as Danegeld, hence more pennies are found in Sweden than England.

 

This penny could have been minted any time between, and including, the years 997 and 1003. The obverse, portrait side, reads ÆTHELRÆD REX ANGLORX - Aethelred King of England.

 

The reverse reads GODEFRID M-O LÆP which translates roughly as Godfrith on Lewes. The mint is quite scarce with regard to Anglo Saxon pennies. The name "Lewes", pronounced 'Lewis', is thought to be derived from the Anglo-Saxon word for hill which was HLÆW this might refer to the abundance of burial mounds situated around Lewes or perhaps the South Downs which lie within the region.

 

The "peck" marks that are visible on both sides of the coins were often made with a knife to test the purity of the silver but there is the possibility that they are teeth marks.

 

Lewes castle was built by William de Warenne, First Earl of Surrey who was loyal to William the Conqueror. So the castle would not have existed during Anglo Saxon times but the mint was very active during the reigns of William I and II, perhaps because the owner of Lewes was favoured by both Kings.

 

Another mint to add to my collection on a stunning penny.

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Love at first sight it is as simple as that LOL Just a slight side note while English coins have been very regulated as Clive says there have been periods when you actualy could go out and mint your own coins LOL just have a look at some of the tokens that circulated due to the shortage of small change and for the most part they were shall we say unregulated :ninja:

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Steve's quite right, especially during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries vast numbers of tokens were minted to be circulated alongside the normal coinage.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Aethelred II Penny, Smaller Crux type. +LIFINC M-O CÆNT, i.e. Lifinc on Canterbury. Very dark patina so photos are not brilliant. Dating to around 995.

 

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Still amazed at how many views this page has had, thanks CPers!

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Still amazed at how many views this page has had, thanks CPers!

 

 

Yeah, I'm amazed by that too. Something about this thread attracts googlebots I bet. I can't think of why though. It must be great publicity for your website.

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Yeah, I'm amazed by that too. Something about this thread attracts googlebots I bet. I can't think of why though. It must be great publicity for your website.

 

This all leads to one conclusion... Googlebot is an advanced machine that has developed an interest in coin collecting.

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So people are not actually interested in seeing some of my New Ps? :ninja:

 

Yes, Google are one of my biggest clients. They wanted me to do Coingle, a coin search engine, but I declined.

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So people are not actually interested in seeing some of my New Ps? ;)

 

Yes, Google are one of my biggest clients. They wanted me to do Coingle, a coin search engine, but I declined.

 

Of course people are interested in your coins! :ninja:

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Managed to get a copy of Odysseus Unbound by Robert Bittlestone with James Diggle, (professor of Greek and Latin at Cambridge), and John Underhill, (professor of stratigraphy). Got them all to sign it too and had a chat with Robert and James. James is a very interesting gentleman to speak to although most of the Ancient Greek flies over my head, latin is bad enough. Much easier just to read the books in English!

 

Although not coin related it is still a good book. All about Homer's real Ithaca.

 

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Received a few today, two from Venice and two from Essex. In no particular order...:

 

 

A Commonwealth Halfpenny. I do not come across these too often so makes a welcome addition to my Commonwealth small silver selection. It is a minuscule coin, less than a centimetre in diameter.

 

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Henry VII Halfpenny, London mint, Class I.

 

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Edward IV (Second Reign) Halfgroat, Canterbury mint, with C on breast. Mint mark rose.

 

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Henry VII Halfgroat, Canterbury mint. Archbishop Morton, type I.

 

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I know, I should imagine that they all come from different backgrounds with regards to collections and findspots.

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Just got back from the BNS meeting, very good lecture by Martin Allen. Returned home to find two packages for me.

 

Here's one, will post other one tomorrow. Coin is far superior to the pictures.

 

Henry II Tealby penny of scarcer Exeter mint. Easily a VF and is one of the best examples I've come across, these were notoriously poorly struck. Is of moneyer Guncelin and looks to be bust A, making it circa 1158-61. The mint, moneyer and condition make this a very sought-after coin.

 

 

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Many thanks Mike, the obverse really is more detailed than the picture shows. I'm not used to full-flans and central striking for this issue!

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Wow Clive that is the best Tealby mint that I have seen for quite some time ;) seen some claiming to be on ebay LOL but how they could tell I will never know :ninja:

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Many thanks gents. I must say that I really do like that Charles!!

 

Here's the one I did not get around to photographing on Tuesday. It really is a hard one to take pictures of.

 

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Archbishop Wulfred of Canterbury, 805 to 832. Saeberht as the moneyer and obviously Canterbury mint. This is of Group III and has the Regular Monogram on the reverse. Although no pellets on the obverse there is one to the left of the monogram, very few coins are recorded as having a pellet, making this even rarer. The reverse is also unusual in that the E and T of MONETA are slanted considerably. It appears that the dies for this coins are unrecorded and it also looks as if it was found in a very sandy soil due to its reddy-brown colouring. This penny dates to around 818.

 

Archbishop Wulfred is presumed to have come from a wealthy family in Middlesex and he brought about great change at Canterbury during his archiepiscopacy.

 

Very rare and so was lucky to get one cheaply, even if it has been through the wars! Spink 889 for all those interested.

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