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Coin Portrait of the Week #26


Drusus
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Looks like we have 2 this week :ninja:

 

SILVER MEDAL / BADEN-BADEN / 1883

 

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Silver Medal Depicting Grande Duke Friedrich I of Baden and his wife Princess Louise of Prussia

 

This silver medal features two outstanding portraits of Friedrich I Grand Duke von Baden, etc. and his wife Princess Louise of Prussia, daughter of Kaiser Wilhelm I. On the reverse is pictured The the town of Baden-Baden identified by its ancient Roman name 'Civitas Aurelia Aquensis.' with 'MDCCC - LVIII / LXXXIII: (1858 / 83)' under the city relief.

 

Already serving as regent since 1852 in the place of his brother, Ludwig II who was 'mentally unfit' to serve, Friedrich formally became Grand Duke von Baden on January 22, 1858 upon his brothers passing. 1883 would be the 25th anniversary of his tenure as Grand Duke of Baden, one that would last 51 years.

 

The long tenure of the Grand Duke of Baden could be considered the calm before the storm. Under Friedrich I, direct elections to the Parliament of Baden were held furthering the progression towards more democratic forms of government. His support for a constitutional monarchy would open the door to further reforms the type of which was blooming all over Europe pulling it away from feudal government. These reforms would eventually lead to the abolishment of the title of Grand Duke of Baden under his son and sucessor.

 

Friedrich I was the son in law of Kaiser Wilhelm I and was present at Versailles when Wilhelm became the German Emperor in 1871. Upon Friedrich's death at his summer residence on the island of Mainau in southern Germany, his son Friedrich II became the last Grand Duke of Baden in 1907. His son would abdicate 11 years later and the title would be abolished.

 

1883 was also a big year for the town of Baden-Baden. The Iffezheim Racecourse (shown in foreground) was holding its 25th Grosser Preis von Baden. The 25th year of Germany's most prestigious thoroughbred horse race held every year since the first races in 1858. This medal is to celebrate the races, the rule, and the hot baths.

 

The Reverse of this medal shows the city of Baden-Baden nestled in the eastern foothills of the Black Forest, on the banks of the river Oos. The medal identifies the town using the name it was given by the Romans who settled this remote and hostile area: Civitas Aurelia Aquensis. The natural hot springs of Civitas Aurelia Aquensis were known to the Romans, fragments of ancient roman sculptures as well as remains of Roman vapour baths have been found there. The town was renamed Baden when it became the residence of the Margraves of Baden but is known now as Baden-Baden meaning "Baden in Baden" or "Baden in the state of Baden." Baden-Baden continues to be a a popular destination for the hot springs and their reported curative properties.

 

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Looks like we have 2 this week :ninja:

Perfectly fine with me ... Those posts sure are interesting!

 

His support for a constitutional monarchy would open the door to further reforms the type of which was blooming all over Europe pulling it away from feudal government. These reforms would eventually lead to the abolishment of the title of Grand Duke of Baden under his son and sucessor.

Well, Baden sure was a more democratic country from today's POV than Prussia for example. But the end of the monarchy in Baden was primarily if not solely due to the end of the empire in the German Reich after WW1 ...

 

The city name Baden-Baden is a little odd. As you wrote, it used to be "Baden in Baden" (until the early 1930s), but apparently people found that difficult to pronounce, or not very "handy", so the in was left out.

 

Very nice city view, and a good double portrait indeed. ;)

 

Christian

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Well, Baden sure was a more democratic country from today's POV than Prussia for example. But the end of the monarchy in Baden was primarily if not solely due to the end of the empire in the German Reich after WW1 ...

 

My wording might not have put across what I was trying to illustrate about the time period in general. After doing several bio's and write-ups of royalty during the general time period. I found that most of them were facing changing times. There were movements all over Europe for an end to feudalism...do to industrialization, education, indy publications, unions and groups all concerned with the concepts of human rights and universal suffrage.

 

This was happening in Baden as well. While...say...Wilhelm I was pretty much stalling and opposing such measures...Friedrich (and other royalty) seemed a bit more liberal and gave more support to such concepts...this support probably registered as success with those involved in these movements and helped galvanize them to further push for more rights in government and social issues. In essence giving them a foothold in areas like baden where the royalty was more supportive of such change.

 

I was trying to put forth that all across Europe there were these new movements towards more democratic methods (as well as socialist concepts) and more rights to the common man...and while many of the ensconced royals opposed such movements (knowing they might spell the end for them and their titles), Friedrich was more of a supporter and ironically, this support, in a small part, help move Germany into a new governmental system which ended up being the death of the royals. Pre-WWI these movements were gaining momentum and reshaping the government...by WWI, it was pretty much over for the Royals in Germany as feudalism and serfdom were abolished...the empire fell...but these men and titles existed long before the short life German Empire thus its fall was not the reason...it was the REASONS for the fall of the empire that spelled the end for the royals. Nitpicking, maybe but the reason are pretty varied and most have to do with a gradual change in government and towards universal sufferage...the end of the entitled royal master who presides over his serfs.

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Nitpicking, maybe but the reason are pretty varied and most have to do with a gradual change in government and towards universal sufferage...the end of the entitled royal master who presides over his serfs.

Agreed; what I had in mind was that, if more countries (and then states) in Germany - and the German Empire as a whole - had in the early 20c had governments like in Baden, some kind of constitutional monarchy might have "survived" at least for a while. Who knows, Germany might not have become involved in WW1, and some successor to Grand Duke Friedrich might still "rule" as a representational figure like the Benelux and Scandinavian royals.

 

Then again, I am not a big fan of alternate (what-if) history, and not of monarchies either. :ninja:

 

Christian

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