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Rainbow toned coins


Cherry Picker
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i think thats a fake cause as u can c it has spots (of rainbow colours) while others i saw that r real all look like the same colour getting lighter or darker. anyways im a rookie in toning since i only have 1 medal 1839 slightly toned an 1 unc formula 1 commerative coin thats starting to tone :ninja:.

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It didn't look right to me either.! bad when you cant even fool a beginner.. :ninja:

Could write a book on different selling statagies I have seen employed on e-bay, It is comical at best.! ;)

As a newbie, I hate to buy from there.! But then again, as long as a fellow dont spend big $$, it could be the best way to learn.

 

Thanks,Cherry Picker

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Sometimes I am thinking of starting a collection of funny selling strategies. A friend sold a coin in a horrible state on Ebay with the selling motto "Seldom to be found in this condition". What can I say... he was right. :ninja: (Obviously, he had posted good pictures which showed everyone how bad the coin looked.). ;)

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It seems to me that the harsher the colors, the harsher the treatment was to obtain the colors. For instance, dipping seems pretty harsh and gets you really unnaturally vibrant colors. If I were to stick an ASE into an envelope and put it under a hot projector, the colors would be a little more blended and soft.

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Could write a book on different selling statagies I have seen employed on e-bay, It is comical at best.! ;)

As a newbie, I hate to buy from there.! But then again, as long as a fellow dont spend big $$, it could be the best way to learn.

Thanks,Cherry Picker

Don't be put off. Just make sure you know what it is you're bidding for, in spite of the seller's blurb. I've picked up a couple of bargains simply because of poor pictures and ignorance on the part of the seller. But then I collect Hammered English (Plantagenet etc) so the field is open to plenty of Metal Detectorists who don't know what they've got! Long may it continue! :ninja:

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As to toning it is becoming a big item lately on coins. There are a few web sites for just toned coins. AS to making them, there are virtually thousands of methods of making them. Occationally jsut leaving a coin on a window sill in the kitchen will make it tone but will take a long time depending on how much cooking is done. Then there is heating with different chemicals, bury in dirt, soaking in different solutions and many, many more. Some are so good they pass through grading services undecteded as AT. At coin shows I've noticed dealers are charging more for a toned coin than one that looks brand new. Just one more fad I suppose.

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Colorful coins = rant time, sorry. :ninja:

 

For example, the one dealer in town said and I quote "Do you have any idea how many coins I've dipped over the years to REMOVE toning?! Now lately everyone wants those colors!" Toned coins are a current fad , and a fad none-the-less just as Carl said, give it time and the like all fads it will wither.

 

To me very few coins that have natural rainbow toning look good, and most of the AT ones are just as bad. Toning can be nice, don't get me wrong, but I will NEVER and I repeat NEVER pay more for a coin because of its color. I make jewerly, I work with metal all the time, including coin metals, and I can say without a doubt that it is easy for someone with even a little knowledge of metal oxidation to tone a coin that can fool a TPG.

 

Now before anyone throws a fit about that, ask a chemist, and a jeweler, it's true even if you don't want to think it's true. I hate the fact that people go nuts for coins that are simply oxidized, oi. Silver and copper are the easiest coin metals to tone, and any color can be obtained within seconds with the right chemicals. Give me a blast white coin anyday.

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i hate dippers!!! i mean i can understand if it was so black or corroded u couldnt tell wat it is but i think the coin that has real toning or so called freckles i love it!!! it gives the coins a personality!!!

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If a dealer tells you he never dipped a coin, he is a liar. I don't suggest it, because you can ruin a coin, but 1-2 dips most people will never know the difference. It's when it's compiled is when it gets bad. Take a toned unc coin, dip it, it looks fine, dip it again, a good chance it will still look fine, a third time may be pushing it. Now someone else owns that coin, and dips it, and maybe dips it again, and it starts to look bad, and so on and so on.

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Colorful coins = rant time, sorry. :ninja:

 

Now before anyone throws a fit about that, ask a chemist, and a jeweler, it's true even if you don't want to think it's true. I hate the fact that people go nuts for coins that are simply oxidized, oi. Silver and copper are the easiest coin metals to tone, and any color can be obtained within seconds with the right chemicals. Give me a blast white coin anyday.

 

I agree, it would be "to simple" to tone any coin! the softer the metal the easier it would be to accomplish it. I seen a toned coin on e-bay the other day that had little "mess" marks on the reverse, obviously someone had laid it on a screen to heat it..

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A fad that ruins these coins tho, right? Or can you remove this toning afterwards?

 

Basically, No.! You can change the toning by re-heating & applying chemicals, but I doubt you could ever get the original appearance again.. I guess it would be possible if a annealing oven was used, but these are expencive and even so, the corect temperature to achieve would be trial & error..

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Then that is one sad fad.

 

Now I gotta look up what an annealing oven is... :ninja:

 

Lol, I hope the coin is valuable..

The oven simply controls the heat applied + is able to hold that temperature for the correct amount of time to achieve the desired temper/finish. Some metals will temper in a conventional oven while others require temps as high as 700 + for a certain amount of time, the metal must then be plunged into a liquid or simply aloud to air cool. As you can see, there is alots of variables there to guess at.! Would be very difficult to do unless you could get the mint to release the info..

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I like natrually toned coins. I have some Morgans in My collection that have Rainbow tone. Its not the whole coin just around the edge. I wonder in time will the whole coin tone? It probally depend on my storage. I have on Morgan that the tone starts at the edge and goes across the hair and Head Band were liberty is. I think Its cool.

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Oh, thankfully I have no rainbow coins. :ninja:

 

Thank you for the oven definition.

 

I guess I should have added, that a reversal to the original temper/finish would only be possible if certain elements of the metal was not "burned out" in the previous attemp to tone.! If so, no amount of annealing would give the desired results..

 

Cherry Picker

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