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Storing coins


corkykile
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I think I might be starting a topic here that will get some of you up in arms... but here it goes...

 

I have a lot of uncirculated mint sets of U.S. coins that I would like to put into albums for my own viewing pleasure. (okay now, calm down). I have more than one set of most of the mint uncirculated coins and would not open any of those, nor would I touch my silver or cameo proofs

 

What I want to know from you all is what albums do you recommend that will store the coins safely and allow me and my grandkids to be able to see them without touching the actual coin.

 

I already have a Dansco penny album that I am using for my special Lincoln cent treasures. And I have Harris/Whitman albums for the touchable grand kids pennies, etc., for the normal circulated coins I have been collecting for all of us.

 

You ideas and thoughts please.

 

CK

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I love Danscos. Although the only problem I can see with them is toning. My Nebraska quarter in my Type Set album is starting to tone gold around the rims, it's only been in there about a year or so.

 

If you are going to cut out coins from a mint/proof set I'd highly recommend some white cotton gloves (normally sold at coin shops). This will help prevent marks, scratches, fingerprints, etc.

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I don't really like albums like Dancos etc.. Now I've got 7 albums for 20 coins per page, stored in those 2x2 coinholders. It's a cheap, and great looking system to store coins in albums, and they're protected from fingerprints etc. :ninja: After that I printed some stickers with informations about the coins and put them on those coinholders.. it's a bit work, but when you are ready with it, it just looks great

 

unbenannt2zn2.jpg

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Thanks Burks.

 

I think you might be right about the Dansco, especially because they do not seal well.

Maybe I will try Marvin's idea (he is next in line with suggestions).

 

I was really worried everyone would jump on me about taking the mint uncirculated sets from their cellophane packets and putting them in albums. Some of the older packets have coins that are already being toned... 61, 62, 63... so I guess what I plan to do isn't so bad after all. I have more than one set of these, so I think it might be worth putting one set in a nice album where I could actually look at and compare them easier.

 

Of course, I would never disrupt a really nice cameo proof or silver cameo proof set or coin...

 

Best,

CK

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I use all Whitman Classic Albums. I have 96 of them with practically all denominations. The better sets are put into freezer type zip lock bags with as much air pushed out as possible. I've been doing this for many, many years and no adverse toning, discolorations, corroding, etc. Many of my coins are from when I started collecting in 1943 and still look the same only older. If this is not protection for a few hundred more years I'll let you know.

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I'm having the same problem. I'm positive that I'll be using Air-Tite capsules, but for all I know after I get the coins in there the filled capsules could end up in a shoebox in the closet. So my somewhat-related-to-the-topic question is: album or box/tray?

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the filled capsules could end up in a shoebox in the closet. So my somewhat-related-to-the-topic question is: album or box/tray?

 

I decided to go with the 2x2's for now. I already have pages made by Cowan that have twenty slide-in slots which are perfect for 2x2's. The coins that are in graded slabs do not fit in the slots, but I am sure you could get the capsules into these clear pages and they would probably display nicely.

 

The pages I purchased at my coin dealer's shop, but I think you can order them elsewhere on the internet. I might decide to go airtight capsules myself. Time will tell.

 

CK

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I love Danscos. Although the only problem I can see with them is toning. My Nebraska quarter in my Type Set album is starting to tone gold around the rims, it's only been in there about a year or so.

 

If you are going to cut out coins from a mint/proof set I'd highly recommend some white cotton gloves (normally sold at coin shops). This will help prevent marks, scratches, fingerprints, etc.

 

 

And when you go to push that coin down into the hole of the album, how do you not leave marks on the coin ? Even if you are wearing gloves.

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And when you go to push that coin down into the hole of the album, how do you not leave marks on the coin ? Even if you are wearing gloves.

use the end of a screwdriver thats how i do it..

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I like Dansco and similar albums because it is so nice and easy to view your coins. But I like air-tite capsules a whole lot too. I have some air-tite albums that are working out ok - check them out link here

 

But I also will put air-tites inside labeled flips and then into the 3-ring binder holders as well. Except this does not work well for large coins.

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The 2x2 (5cm x 5 cm for us metrics :ninja: ) coinholders are similar in size with the usual photoslides. There are some really nice boxes for slides made of wood, like the one I got the other day on ebay. It really is a beautiful thing and can store 600 coinholders. That won't last long, but at least my world coins have a home now and can expand for a while. The only thing one must be careful of is the little latch of the coinholders. Some slide boxes have enough space for them, some don't. This one was just right!

 

Box.jpg

 

PS: This is the ebay sale photo. My camera just died on me and I can't find the cable.

PS2: I know this is not an album, but still a nice way of presenting your coins.

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Graikos - you said you found that on eBay, what was it listed as? I'll even settle for a jewelry box if it is the right size.

 

EDIT: Though the Air-Tite albums are pretty nice...

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The 2x2 (5cm x 5 cm for us metrics :ninja: ) coinholders are similar in size with the usual photoslides. There are some really nice boxes for slides made of wood, like the one I got the other day on ebay. It really is a beautiful thing and can store 600 coinholders. That won't last long, but at least my world coins have a home now and can expand for a while. The only thing one must be careful of is the little latch of the coinholders. Some slide boxes have enough space for them, some don't. This one was just right!

 

Box.jpg

 

PS: This is the ebay sale photo. My camera just died on me and I can't find the cable.

PS2: I know this is not an album, but still a nice way of presenting your coins.

 

 

Be careful using wood boxes for coin storage - the wrong kind of wood can be very detrimental to your coins. Mahogany is about the only one recommended.

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And when you go to push that coin down into the hole of the album, how do you not leave marks on the coin ? Even if you are wearing gloves.

 

Use the cover slip and very carefully do so. I've yet to mark a coin.

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@Treasuregirl

 

It was found under (and these are translations of the german Ebay site)

 

photography -> slide photography -> storage. I searched for "slide box wood" and found it.

 

The nice thing is that the shelves are divided into 50 "stands" and all of them are numbered on the upper side of the drawer. That can also help is cataloging the coins.

 

@GDJMSP

 

Thank you for your warning. The coins are all in 2x2 coinholders and many are rather modern ones (I keep my ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine coins in special drawers from Leuchtturm). They have absolutely no contact to the wood. What exactly does happen to coins in wooden boxes? I can't imagine anything that could harm them, that wouldn't harm the sensitive slides as well. Would be nice if you could give me some more information.

 

PS: I will try to make some new photos of the thing, with open drawers and everything. If only I could find that blasted cable.

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wood "exhales" gasses that might cause chemical reactions with the metal of the coin. This can result in toning or worse....

 

There's no need for physical contact to get your coins affected. And Air Tites aren't as tight as the name suggests.

 

So far, mahogany is the only wood that isn't "exhaling" bad gasses. Bad for coins that is.

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Air Tites aren't as tight as the name suggests.

 

What would you suggest instead? I'm trying to find a permanent form of storage short of slabbing my 1996-D cent.

 

EDIT: What kind of capsule do proof ASE's come in?

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I see. Well I don't collect proof coins and my really valuable ones are on special coin trays anyway. I will be fine with this beauty for the time being. I am checking my coins anyway every now and again and I'll just have to make sure that air circulates in this thing, meaning opening the drawers.

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Note that ALL woods decay. Actually all organic materials decay. The decaying process is pending on location due to different invironments. In modern times many woods are treated with preservatives to make them last longer. Examples are the timbers you see used for landscaping. Those sit on the ground, exposed to wind, rain, teenagers, snow, sleet, hail, sun and other distructive forces. Many of the woods used to make furniture today are also treated types of wood for many reasons. Mildew, rodents, worms, insects, humidity, etc. Pending on the type of wood, the emissions of gasses or the absorbsion of gasses or humidity may effect coins left in the facinity for long periods of time. Many modern day woods are made in a hurry so much of the original moisture is still present and will leak off and possibly carry with it some other types of substances. All this is important for long storages of coins, currency, stock certificates, morgage papers, etc. Summation is for long storage of critical materials, wood is not recommended. Maay look nice, but........

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What do you all think of using unofficial slabs like these for storage?

 

(Note: Not trying to advertise; I just saw these at my local coin shop and wondered how well they worked)

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/5-NEW-ANACS-STYLE-SLAB...1QQcmdZViewItem

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What do you all think of using unofficial slabs like these for storage?

 

(Note: Not trying to advertise; I just saw these at my local coin shop and wondered how well they worked)

Just about anything is usefull for long term storage as long as it is usefull for some, and I mean some, of the following:

A container that does not leak gasses internally

A container not made of a substance that will absorb moisture or other gasses

A container that will not allow air or other gasses to penetrate easily

A container that will not allow strong lighting to enter

Now that alone does not allow for to many containers. Again, almost any type of wood is not a good idea. Woods of any type are absorbant of humidity. The more moisture present, the more they will absorb uless treated with chemicals to make them water proof. However, these types of chemicals are not nice to coins.

Many plastics are great but there too mistakes are possible. The overexagerated PVC thing is an example. PVC itself is very, very stable. It is used in piping for water that people drink. It is the ones made flexible with the additives that leak off onto coins that is the problem. And as it dissipates mostly, the PVC becomes more stiff and also very safe. Some coins in very old PVC wraps look the same as the day they were put there.

My preference for long term storage though is putting a coin in a 2x2 flip, sealing the edges with clear tape, putting the 2x2 in those plastic sheets that hold 20 2x2's, putting those in a 3 ringed binder and then putting that in a freezer type zip lock bag. Not easy to view your coins but they will still look the same in a few hundred years.

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