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COIN EXPORTING LAWS


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I am going to Bulgaria soon. I have a lot of old and silver coins (100-200) and I would like to take them back to Chicago with me. Some people told me that it is illigal. Does anyone know about coin exporting laws from the EU to the US.

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I guess if you're making an obvious haul, then that is a little shady. but if you just have a bunch of change, then that's less so.

 

which part of Chicagoland are you from? I'm on the northside and like seeing which coinpeople are in the area.

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I don't see a problem...I'd expect some raised eyebrows, question and possibly searches, but other than that I don't see any major problems.

 

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But before I would make these assumptions, I would surf both countries government sites for info.

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I am going to Bulgaria soon. I have a lot of old and silver coins (100-200) and I would like to take them back to Chicago with me. Some people told me that it is illigal. Does anyone know about coin exporting laws from the EU to the US.

The exporting law depends on the county, you'd have to find out the laws of Bulgaria.

As far as importing goes, there's no specific restrictions on coins into the US. naturaly the generally restriction against Cuba, Iran, and North korea would apply.

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The regulations are very similar to Russia. You cannot take out anything older than 1957 for the case of Russia and any coins & currencies but that's unrealistic.

 

You should contact the proper authorities and ask specifically how you can legally export "COLLECTABLE" coins and perhaps be easier to explain that they are your personal collection. Unfortunately since it's each country's regulation is different, I'm afraid you have to do some research on your own ;) Perhaps the best is to contact the Bulgarian embassy in the US and perhaps they can direct you to the proper authorities. In Russia, it happens to be the Culture Minister but geez, that would be so much work to export some coins :ninja:

 

Good luck ;)

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I wouldn't recommand packing everything in your backpack. I am not too sure how much that 200 coins would be, but it will be observable under x-ray scan.

 

I'm not too sure how strict the customs are in Bulgaria but if you are travelling with someone else, it's better to split the coins so that it wouldn't appear too much under the scan.

 

Good luck :ninja:

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The regulations are very similar to Russia. You cannot take out anything older than 1957 for the case of Russia and any coins & currencies but that's unrealistic.

 

You should contact the proper authorities and ask specifically how you can legally export "COLLECTABLE" coins and perhaps be easier to explain that they are your personal collection. Unfortunately since it's each country's regulation is different, I'm afraid you have to do some research on your own ;) Perhaps the best is to contact the Bulgarian embassy in the US and perhaps they can direct you to the proper authorities. In Russia, it happens to be the Culture Minister but geez, that would be so much work to export some coins :ninja:

 

Good luck ;)

I have to agree with that completely. I know a person that came from Russia with a pile of coins and all were conficated at time of departure. He was given a voucher to reclaim them through proper channels. Later he found no such channels were available. My son spent a year in Europe when he went to the University of Krakow in Poland. He toured all over the place and knowing I am a coin collector he sort of sent me coins that he was specifically told they can not leave the country he was in. The somehow made it through the mail untouched but that may be because he sent them from school. I would absoltely check into the Bulgarian Embassy for statistics. Better to be safe than sorry.

For sure don't try the back pack thing. Didn't work with my kid except Polish coins.

As to the Chicago area, you'll just love it here if you collect coins. We have a minimum of 3 coin shows a month, every month, in the area and all within about 15 miles of O'Hare airport. All are free admittance, free parking, poor food, horrible coffee. If you live on the south side you can't beat the 2nd Sunday of each month at Countryside. Super great MidAmerica coin Expo coming up June 21 to 24th at the Rosemont Convention Center. It's on River Road, near the expressway, across from the stupid Rosemont Theater. Really great show however, parking is about $11, entrance is about $5, food sucks and is also expensive, coins are over priced. I go to that one because I can just about walk there from home.

If you get a chance to go to any of the coin shows here, I'll be the old man that gets there as they are opening up. I go to all of them.

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I did some reasurch. This is what I found:

Upon entering and exiting the customs territory of the Republic of Bulgaria foreigners obligatorily fill in a declaration after a sample for the following currency value they carry:

- Bulgarian banknotes and coins in circulation in amounts over BGN 10,000; - Bulgarian coins in circulation of numismatic value; - Foreign currency equal to more than US$ 1,000; - Shares issued by foreign entities in foreign currency, obligation notes, treasury-bonds, investment and depository certificates, cheques, bills of exchange, order bills, credit letters and other similar valuable papers; - Precious metals and precious stones and products of these other than the usual amounts for personal and family use - in type, weight, and value; - Coins, containing gold, silver and platinum - in type, weight, and value; - Other (hard) currency values. The export is prohibited of articles, coins of gold, silver, and platinum of historic, archaeological, artistic, and numismatic value included, except for the cases when there is a permit issued by the Minister of culture.

Does anyone know what "The export is prohibited of articles, coins of gold, silver, and platinum of historic, archaeological, artistic, and numismatic value included" means

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Is BS, that's what it is. It's the same as in Poland, and probably a LOT of other countries. My parents had to leave behind some really cool coins. :ninja: It's BS, but you can get busted for it. ;)

< /rant >

 

To the question:

Don't quote me on this, but my interpretation is that you can't take any gold, silver or platinum out of the country, period. (Unless you go through a waterfall of red tape)

 

EDIT: If you really want to take them back to the U.S, contact the government to clarify.

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What you see on ebay is perhaps taken out by buyers a long time before these laws were even created. Obviously the laws were made to protect it's cultural heritage. Of course from time to time, you might see some sellers from such countries selling them but often it's illegal, either by bribes or just plain lucky. Otherwise, it can be possible that some sellers did write letters to the Ministry of Culture.

 

Whether it's BS or whatever, it does happen and obviously customs are more than happy to take it away from you and perhaps make a fat profit out of it (that's perhaps how they earn extra money) That said, since I was in Russia physically before, I know too well how things work there. Customs are hungry to confisicate anything they can under "laws" and either you pay some ridicious fine or you can really get yourself into jail! (it has happened before to someone that I know)

 

Again, I don't know how big those 200 coins are or how old they are and their total weight. If most of them are crown sized, I wouldn't recommand it. Once again, if you really want to take all of them out at once, it's better to send an email to the Ministry of Culture in Bulgaria and confirm the situation. It's probably going to be ridiciously tedious but it's better to be safe than sorry as once the customs take it away, you'll never see it again.

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I wonder how it works on ebay because a lot of ancient, silver and gold coins can be bought from all over the world. Does that make selling ancients overseas on ebay illigal?

Now that is something I never thought about. People all over the world buy and sell coins from all over the world on ebay and there appears to be no problem. I wonder if the mail thing is the way to go since ebay buyers and sellers use the mail, UPS, DHL, etc. Governments just can not spend the time or money xraying, scanning, opening all the mail that comes and goes from country to country. Like I said my son had no problem sending me anything from other countries and that may be due to just to much mail to go through.

As long as there is no massive amount of coins in a package, I doubt anyone cares or really knows.

Now here is something to try. If you are in another country, plan on coming here, put coins in a package, leave with a friend with instructions to send after you've left. I don't think that country would or could have you deported from here for smugling coins. But then again...........

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just carl, it's quite different from how things work when I was in Russia although I am not too sure how it is in Bulgaria. I am somewhat assuming that Eastern Europe is trying hard to regulate what can't be sent aboard or what can't be taken out of the country. It does seem very lame but I guess it's part of "Culture Heritage"

 

The post office that I went actually requires the sender NOT to warp things up and they will physically inspect what you are going to send. Clever as it does sound but there are some places where people bribe just to send some things out or just some post offices that don't give much care. Now that is where some indigious sellers cut a hole up in unwanted books or cupboards and try to fake the contents up when they want to send coins. But 200 coins will not be easy to conseal. If it was 10 or so, it might be an easy story but 200 is a bit hm.

 

Last time when I was sending a bunch of Russian books that I bought in Russia, the clerk was checking them cautiously. Fortunately none are any older than 1957 or anything political else I might have to do a lot of explanation why I am trying to send it out.

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You could have said that you were just trying to export comunism to the west LOL If it is only a few coins then try keeping them with your pocket change, buy a small purse so they are not on open display.

 

 

:ninja:

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Thinking about this I just remembered there was a really big International Coin Show here in the Chicago area a while back this year. There are about two a year in this area. Although I don't collect foreign coins the place is really close to my house so I go to all of them. At these shows there are many, many dealers with coins from all over the world. These coins are very old, just old, almost new and new. In other words coins of all dates, denominations and materials such as Gold, Silver, Copper and just about anything else.

SO NOW, just how do THEY get those coins out of the countries? Surely not one at a time. Way to many coins there. Many dealers have hundreds and hundreds of coins. Just wonder if there is some law in all countries that exclude coin dealers or something. Again, the coins I've seen at these shows have dates from brand new to very old so if new how were they able to get here? :ninja:;)

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Most likely in the same way that any company moves items from one country to another with the use of export licences, I would imagine that they would have to have all there stock listed for customs in whatever country they entered & departed from, also for insurance purposes.

 

 

:ninja:

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