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Im doing a speech


LostDutchman

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hey gang, A group of businessmen asked me to come talk to their group about coins this weekend... They want a general overview of coins from a collecting and investing standpoint. I figured I would give a general overview of coins and their use through the ages and a look into collecting. I was wondering if anyone could maybe help me come up with some points that should be covered that I might have missed. I have to fill 30 min. I have covered early coins... shells... beads... pieces of gold and silver.... and moved to stamped coinage. I have a nice show and tell lined up of american coins from gold pieces to rare silver coins. I wanted to cover early coin collecting and collectors but haven't been able find much information.... I have just really started gathering and organizing information... but I wanted to get some opinions from your standpoint of things that I should and that you might like to see covered if I was presenting this to you... there is a lot of information to be covered.... I really appreciate any input anyone might be able to give me in undertaking this effort!

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General overview is quite neat - will we be able to see your video? :ninja:

 

This is the best advice to businessmen: if you don't know what you are going to buy, at least seek professional dealers and ask for their opinions! ;) As well as a catalogue is always the best investment for coins.

 

As well as, never just collect coins purely for investment purposes as they may rise and drop like all commodities. ;)

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I actually wrote a speech for my SP&M class last year, and I covered how fascinating it was to see the history IN the coins themselves. I used the Morgan and Peace dollar Liberty designs as an example of the evolution of our perception of beauty. A fun speech to make, even had fellow students ask me to inspect their change for them (my last line was, "because you don't want to spend $500 on a candy bar!")

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Very neat Matt! I actually made a speech to the morning Rotary Club here in town about a month ago, I just covered what got me interested and the historical aspects. There were some interesting questions, but in the end, I got several questions on evaluating collections, so I am actually contemplating doing appraisal/cataloging on the side for an hourly fee. So don't be surprised if you generate some business for yourself our of this!

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hey gang, A group of businessmen asked me to come talk to their group about coins this weekend... They want a general overview of coins from a collecting and investing standpoint. I figured I would give a general overview of coins and their use through the ages and a look into collecting. I was wondering if anyone could maybe help me come up with some points that should be covered that I might have missed. I have to fill 30 min. I have covered early coins... shells... beads... pieces of gold and silver.... and moved to stamped coinage. I have a nice show and tell lined up of american coins from gold pieces to rare silver coins. I wanted to cover early coin collecting and collectors but haven't been able find much information.... I have just really started gathering and organizing information... but I wanted to get some opinions from your standpoint of things that I should and that you might like to see covered if I was presenting this to you... there is a lot of information to be covered.... I really appreciate any input anyone might be able to give me in undertaking this effort!

 

Congrats on the opportunity LD.

 

I will add my overly-opinionated comments to those of the others as you have asked.

 

Assuming you will present using a PowerPoint platform (if you're not then a lot of this will not apply)... rehearse your talk thoroughly using a stopwatch. Do it enough times so that you can convince yourself that you can say what you want to say in the time alloted. The best presentations I have given are the ones that were well thought out and well rehearsed - so much so that nobody knew they were rehearsed. If you don't do this, you may have a very rude awakening regarding how long 30 minutes really lasts.

 

Keep questions under your control. If you want a very informal atmosphere, that's great, but you are the presenter and don't let the audience determine your presentation or you might find 20 minutes have gone by and you are on your second slide. Of course, you should offer the opportunity for open questions at the end of your presentation.

 

Avoid, like the plague, half-assed fancy visual effects, annoying transitions, and over-use of a laser pointer. Attend to fundamental design principles unless you know what you're doing with graphic arts. Use dark text on light background or light text on dark background. Assume your audience of buisnessmen do not have the eyesight of a 20 year old. Use beautiful high-resolution coin pictures.

 

Keep your major points simple and don't have too many of them - introduce them, illustrate them, state them again - move on. We are basically not too bright and we have very short attention spans. You may get into some trouble if you start with shells and end up with PresiBucks. Please don't try to do a 4-hour Discovery Channel documentary in 20 minutes to a group who just want to know where they can get 20% annually investing in coins (not that it is the case, but it might be).

 

Good luck on how you want to handle the 'coins as investments' angle. But remember, you are appearing as a representative of the coin collecting profession - a profession that, in my opinion, serves, primarily, the hobbyist, not the investor. If you truly believe that coins are investment vehicles for a very few that are knowledgeable - then stay true to yourself and don't say what you think they want to hear - tell them what you know. Even the cover of Q. David Bower's, The Experts Guide has a splash that reads "Invest Hundreds Make Thousands! Eliasberg, Pittman, and Ford did it - and you can too!" blah blah blah

 

A nice 'ending' for the talk might include what they should do next (aside from buy a zillion dollars worth of coins from you). Recommended books, ANA contacts, your buisness card, that sort of thing.

 

If you find yourself getting nervous about speaking (very common) don't try to picture your audience naked, just remember: you are the one with the information and they are there to hear and learn from you - if you don't believe that, then don't give the talk.

 

The Expert's Guide by Q. David Bowers also has several chapters on early coin collecting and collectors.

 

Have fun with it.

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Good advice everyone. I don't have any specific coin advice for you, but classic teaching method always comes in handy. As said above, people have short memories and even shorter attention spans.

 

Tell them what you're going to tell them.

 

Tell it to them.

 

Then tell them what you just told them.

 

Good luck.

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I would certainly add a paragraph or two on:

 

1) Reputable vs. shady certification services. Something along the lines of "not all MS-65s are created equal."

 

2) Buy the book before the coin, in other words know what you are buying.

 

PS: Maybe you can talk about your latest discovery coin - the 1909-DVDB cent! :ninja: Just kidding... good luck with the speech.

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rather then a power point I plan to take about 20 or so coins from st. gaudens to error coins and tokens... I also plan to put together a grab of coins for the gents... I have a rough outline together already... and when you know and love something you can talk about it for hours... I am excited... aparently these guys are not collectors...maybe ill convert a few

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it went very well thanks again guys! I explained the minting process and it seemed like they all enjoyed what I prepared. I also gave them all a small little grab bag of coins just for listening to me ramble for an hour... hahah

Probably the smartest thing you did was the grab bag. Most people had a limited memory span that allows them to forget almost anything. However, that grab bag idea makes forgetting difficult.

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