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Dipping coins


Mark Stilson
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No, this should not be controversial. My first experience on dipping did not go well. Just wondering what should I use to dip or clean pre 1982 lincolns so they turn out nice for a rolling machine. (I.E. elongated pennies.) I bought and tried some ezest and it seemed to work. I dropped them in my truck and next day stopped off at a machine. They appeared to have darkened and after when rolled showed a dark outline of the original coin. So much you can barely make out the print.

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For elongates -- a brass/copper polish like the Noxon stuff would work. There's also a dip for copper that Walgreens sells but I don't remember the name. I usually try to use nice choc brown copper Lincolns or some from UNC rolls. UNC rolls with coins that have some black spotting can be had for just a little over face at many shows/clubs.

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Here is a 100% method to make Copper real nice and shinny. Go to a good auto supply store and ask for a bottle or bag of battery acid. If a decent auto parts store they should have some. It is not real strong but will really make your coins clean as new. Until recently and still many being used is what is known as Lead-Acid Batteries. The Acid is Sulfuric, H2SO4. This will really clean your coins, however, note do not leave it in that solution to long. Use only GLASS utinsils such as a GLASS plate. Use gloves and try to find glass utinsils for adding and removing the coins. It is not very strong but it will not feel good if you get it in a open soar, your eyes, nose, lips, etc. Sort of like the hottest pepper you ever ate. If you don't need a large quantity, just check out the battery in your car, friends car, relatives car or just a neighbor's car. Use a turkey baster to remove a small amount from each and put in a glass. Replace with distilled water and don't get caught.

A chemical supply house is also a good place to get some but they may want documentation of what you are planning on doing with the stuff.

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I did not think about the battery acid bit. May give that a try also. I work on industrial UPS/battery systems. Most of our systems are lead/acid. Bring along a little bit of baking soda for a final soak/rinse after the acid may work well.

 

(One of those don't try this at home. I'm a professional and have acid holes in my pants to prove it. :ninja: )

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Acid + Open cuts = paaaaaain. The moron in the hood next to me spilled some 6M H2SO4 (or was it HCl?) on my hand once, hurt like hell for about a week. Not fun. Also have some rather nicely stained pants due to acid as well......

 

Let us know how it turns out.

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I did not think about the battery acid bit. May give that a try also. I work on industrial UPS/battery systems. Most of our systems are lead/acid. Bring along a little bit of baking soda for a final soak/rinse after the acid may work well.

 

(One of those don't try this at home. I'm a professional and have acid holes in my pants to prove it. :ninja: )

You may have a cheap resourse right at hand for doing the job. Nothing like a work place for home supplies I always say. Keep us informed.

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