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Stalin coin on mad prices


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Stalin was never featured on any Russian coins until recently in 1995 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of WWII on a kilo silver coin. However he was featured on two Czechoslovkian coins in 1949, namely on 50 korun and 100 korun.

 

This is the only Russian coin that featured Stalin: http://www.cbr.ru/eng/bank-notes_coins/Bas...t_num=5117-0002

 

905392.jpg

905393.jpg

 

Sorry for the bad photo - those were the days that I didn't even know how to use a digital camera properly.

 

And the price of the 100 korun http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...em=190100003254

 

I was pretty sure that I got mine at Moscow at an inflated price 800 rubles which I thought was relatively expensive by then but oh well... that's definately more than what I would have paid for.

 

I just don't get it - are these people not doing their research? :ninja:

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They are very cheap on Czech rep., here's one in AU/UNC for just above 6 Euro:

 

LINK (check "ČESKOSLOVENSKO - mince" and then " 1918-1953 ČSR")

 

I'm sure there is a "When two idiots want the same coin" tale behind this particular case.

 

Jose ;)

 

 

Dang, wish you hadn't posted that, I found... Czechoslovakian notes :ninja:

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I have those coins...I dont remember how much I paid...but it was way way way way way less than THAT. maybe 15 bucks for the pair. You dont see them come up for sale a lot but that doesnt justify THAT price...they arent that rare...I am sure I could do a search and find them for sale somewhere for a semi-reasonable price. Good to know if I put these on ebay I might get such a price for a 15 buck investment :ninja:

 

stalin100.jpg

 

stalin50.jpg

 

cool coins though...great portrait.

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On my site these are for 25 euro/pair. I had 3 sets bought from Germany few years ago and since then I didn't see very often anothers available. Maybe I wil withdraw the last set from site....Czechoslovakian commems are regularily at low prices, I dunno why, maybe because of low interest, or due relatively high mintages - some coins were meleted by Czech mint in late '90's (the unsold stock)

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Just makes me wonder who the clown or clowns were that thought it was a good idea to put this mass murderer and oppressor of the Czech people on coins? Maybe it should be known, so that good Czechs with a fill of fine Pilsner could make a midnight put the fire out raid on their graves.

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Just makes me wonder who the clown or clowns were that thought it was a good idea to put this mass murderer and oppressor of the Czech people on coins?

Huh? Czechoslovakia was a socialist - basically Stalinist - country at that time. The coins were issued for Stalin's 70th birthday. Not exactly surprising, considering the "person cult" in those years. (Actually I would have expected more USSR "allies" to do the same thing.) Other oppressors can be found on coins from various other countries ...

 

What is really strange in my opinion is a 5 dollar "coin" with the US eagle (much like the one on the JFK half) and "E Pluribus Unum" on one side, and Stalin on the other. :ninja: OK, it was not issued by the US government but by (or in the name of) some "Baker Island" ... in 1995, to commemorate the Yalta Conference.

 

Christian

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On my site these are for 25 euro/pair. I had 3 sets bought from Germany few years ago and since then I didn't see very often anothers available. Maybe I wil withdraw the last set from site....Czechoslovakian commems are regularily at low prices, I dunno why, maybe because of low interest, or due relatively high mintages - some coins were meleted by Czech mint in late '90's (the unsold stock)

 

 

Final bid was $275 + shipping for an ugly, porous 1949 Stalin 100 korun (a less-than-$5 junkbox coin if I've ever seen one).

 

The seller must be doing backflips.

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Huh? Czechoslovakia was a socialist - basically Stalinist - country at that time. The coins were issued for Stalin's 70th birthday. Not exactly surprising, considering the "person cult" in those years. (Actually I would have expected more USSR "allies" to do the same thing.)

 

 

The fact that other Soviet-controlled governments didn't make similar coins, not even in the USSR itself, says something about the bootlickers in Prague who did.

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Even Lenin was reportedly afraid of Stalin taking power, and tried to prevent it.

 

 

Which is the precise reason Nadezhda Krupskaya was more or less shunttered out of the public eye after her husband's demise. At least she was lucky, she apparently died a natural death, the same cannot be said for Stalins wife, whom he had murdered.

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Drusus, maybe that's next on your "coin portrait of the week"? :ninja:

 

I decided not to go into a long bio of the man on these coins...this is what I put on my site regarding these coins:

 

After World War II and after its restoration as a nation following Nazi occupation, Parliamentary elections saw that by 1949 Czechoslovakia was controlled by the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia and heavily influenced by the Soviet Union.

 

This coin is part of a series minted to commemorate the 70th Birthday of Joseph Stalin, and has a superb portrait of the Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars and General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party four years before his death in 1953.

 

The country soon split down ethnic lines into a federation of two distinct republics, the Czech Socialist Republic and Slovak Socialist Republic. Growing anti-communist sentiments saw the country move towards democracy In 1989 and through the Velvet Revolution the country became a democratic nation again . More recently the country formally split becoming the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

 

stalin.jpg

 

 

;) I like the coins, as portriats they are outstanding IMO. There is so much information concerning Stalin, I just thought I would give him a pass, maybe I will go back and expand it one day though.

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I have been to places in the Kolyma in Magadan Oblast where 10.000 people were shot to death by the NKVD, and up to the Gulag where uncounted thousands died in the gold mines there.

 

Unfortunately in Russia of today there is no discussion of that like 15 years ago, so Stalin can make an appearance on a commemorative coin in 1995. Too bad they didn't put horns on him.

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Scottishmoney is right, but in the 1995 coin not Stalin is the main subject. His portrait is so small and I wonder if this is not a "devaluation" of his historic role. From that allegoria you can understand that the locomotive was the main factor of Soviet victory... :ninja:

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Scottishmoney is right, but in the 1995 coin not Stalin is the main subject. His portrait is so small and I wonder if this is not a "devaluation" of his historic role. From that allegoria you can understand that the locomotive was the main factor of Soviet victory... :ninja:

Hehe, good explanation. ;) Just a side note - the one I "showed" is from 2005, and that one does indeed have a tiny Stalin plaque on the engine. The piece from 1995 (see link in the first post) shows him a little more prominently, but along with American and British WW2 leaders ...

 

Christian

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