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Coin values vs. Recession


bahabully
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Bad day on the street today. Greenspan saying that the run from 1991 to present is probably at the tail end and recessive pressures are singing like a coffee kettle on an open fire.

 

How do coin values fair during recessive storms ? Do they also tend deflate as the price of a stock... they did appear to enjoy a rapid rise in price since 1991 also,,, due for a 10-15% correction in the next yr or two ?

 

Any worldly advice regarding how to make money in a recessive/pre-recessive economy ?

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Well, depends on whether you are an investor or a purist collector. If you are a collector value is no matter, however if you are in it to make money then it is a very risky investment. I don't buy coins as an investment, but as little works of fine art. So I could give a care less what happens with their values.

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I'm a collector set on completing my sets and getting the coins I want. Some of the coins I need will have value to investors. So I am still affected by the market.

 

Here is a good spin on bahabully's question:

 

1) How would a "recessive/pre-recessive economy" affect the price (at which I am willing to buy) of a standard key date coin - 1934S Peace $1 for example?

 

2) How would a "recessive/pre-recessive economy" affect the price (at which I am willing to buy) of a more rarer, still desireable, but less-collected coin - 1941 Certified Proof 66 Walking Liberty Half Dollar for instance?

 

 

Basically, a Red Book rarity that everyone has always needed to complete a common set vs. a coin with greater rarity but low, albeit growing, collector interest.

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Don't invest in coins. Those which will do worst are the ones with

a high investor/ collector ratio. Collectors will have a chance to

buy coins on the cheap when there is really a downturn in the mar-

ket as investors dump at whatever they can get.

 

Don't assume all coins would do poorly. It was during the great de-

pression that numismatics first became a hobby for the masses. The

great rarities all did well during this time since there was continued

buying. But some of the cheaper coins also did well. The Lincolns

were popular to collect and large numbers collected. Most couldn't

afford expensive coins but even the rarities of the time were usually

only 50c or less so increases came easily.

 

Collectors shouldn't panic even if things actually do get bad which is

hardly a given. Remember that any good stuff you sell might be very

difficult to buy back later. If a bear market is starting then it's probably

too late to unload your extras and less desirable stuff so save it to trade.

If it's not starting (and it probably isn't) then go ahead and unload these

extras when the smoke clears.

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As already stated. If your a coin collector, then it's a hobby and makes no difference if coin values go up or down. Similar to people that collect anything. Example is back in the 70's eeryone stopped making convertible cars. One car dealer purchased lots of the last convertible Cadilacs. He paid about $10,000 each and stated he would someday sell them for a million each. Then came the 80's and the return of the convertibles. OH well, win some, loose some. If your worried about coin values think about the people that used to pay hundreds for a Beanie Baby. I've seen some selling for 2 for a dollar lately. Then there was the Hot Wheels with the Red Walls, baseball and football cards, etc. I know a guy that quit his job to become a camera dealer on the internet and mostly those things called FILM cameras. He is now out looking for a full time job.

The summation is if your into coins for money profit, good luck.

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There was a story in last nights newspaper about a local woman that celebrated her 105th birthday yesterday. She recounted what it was like living through the depression. One of her first memories of the depression was being then 23 yrs old and having nothing but 80¢ to her name. A relative of hers gave her a $2.50 gold piece as a security, and she never ended up having to spend it, but still has it as a souvenir of those hard times. She mentioned coming close to spending it when necessary, but couldn't force herself to.

 

She must be strong of character and body, because they said she was out shoveling snow off of her driveway, which was why she was late getting into the newspaper office.

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In the past before the advent of slab company but now for me it is difficult to cut between collecting and investing, if not for grade the other thing that jack up the price all or most coins should not be a wide gap of price.

 

There are other piece that is rare that even most price goes down other will go down but not like as the rest maybe those coins will fall in the catagory more likely a national treasure.

 

 

Thus a finacial institution can insured a value of a coin for a time even if the value all goes down maybe those coins that are national treasure but other coins that are slab and expensive upto hundred thousands dollar what intitution assure them or insure the coin for safe keeping until the market goes back again to high price.

 

Their are things that can be a collateral for bank but a hundred thousand coins cant be a collateral for a bank just for me or my opinion,If the price fall a expensive slab coins what next wait for the time come back again several thousand is a expensive hobby for a coin.

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With coins here is something to look into. I have almost all the Red Books from the first edition on. If you go through them you do not see a great drop if coin prices for the last 60 Editions. If you've been collecting coins for a long time, you have not really seen a great deal of loss of value on coins. I still remember when I was a kid and saw a plate in the window of a coin shop with 10 Mercury Dimes dated 1916D and all were for $1.50 each. I was a kid and sure didn't have a fortune like $1.50 but somehow I borrowed that and bought all of them. I don't remember thier value ever going down even a little.

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With coins here is something to look into. I have almost all the Red Books from the first edition on. If you go through them you do not see a great drop if coin prices for the last 60 Editions. If you've been collecting coins for a long time, you have not really seen a great deal of loss of value on coins. I still remember when I was a kid and saw a plate in the window of a coin shop with 10 Mercury Dimes dated 1916D and all were for $1.50 each. I was a kid and sure didn't have a fortune like $1.50 but somehow I borrowed that and bought all of them. I don't remember thier value ever going down even a little.

 

 

I can remember when I was a kid seeing a $20 Saint Gaudens in the display case and asking the dealer how much it was, it was $45 and I thought $45 for a $20 coin was a rip off, but I would spend $4.25 for a BU 1878 Morgan Dollar. :ninja:

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