Jump to content
CoinPeople.com

Protecting your Banknote


see323
 Share

Recommended Posts

As I live in a topical climate country, I sealed my banknotes in non-oil based plastic sheet for utimate protection. Share your view on how to protect your banknotes. I have also just created a flash show detailing the process of sealing a banknote. It is under my website articles section. Here is the link.

 

http://www.notepassion.com/Articles/sealing-banknote.htm

 

Cheers.. :ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting flash show, see323! I have got some banknotes from Singapore that was sealed by similar manner. In Sweden, at least indoors the air is mostly dry, because of the isolation in the houses. Most houses use tripple glass for the windows, sometimes with gas sealing, because of the cold winters. This can be a problem for old furnititure that might get cracks because of the dryness indoors.

 

For protecting banknotes I use Abaxa Banknote binders and plastic banknote pages, which is a brand much used in Sweden. I also use the Lembit brand for some of my banknotes, as they display bigger and collourful banknotes better. This is also a swedish brand, I think. This companies have a long and good reputation by swedish numismatic collectors.

// Joakim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice one see323. The flash was a bit too "heavy" in terms of download bandwidth - you might want to reduce the bitrate of the mp3 that you are using.

 

A suggestion that I might recommand that is using a cutter board or a guillotine board for making sharp straight cuts but again optional. :ninja:

 

Thanks for the great flash.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice one see323. The flash was a bit too "heavy" in terms of download bandwidth - you might want to reduce the bitrate of the mp3 that you are using.

 

A suggestion that I might recommand that is using a cutter board or a guillotine board for making sharp straight cuts but again optional. :ninja:

 

Thanks for the great flash.

 

You are right. I did this in a hurry. I shall reduce the mp3 song not by bit rate ( that will lose some quality in the music piece ) but by the length of the song. In fact, it did not use up the whole song. I did the reduction before but my trial mp3 software for trimming the mp3 song ran out. As for the photos, they are reduced in size as smaller jpeg files. My only concern is the copyright issue on the song. May just have to acknowledge the composer later in the flash show.

 

I do have a cutter but it is kind of troublesome when I only seal one or two pieces. A scissor works better and more handy. Those little hands are my son as I need to take shots with my DSLR and direct him to pose in various position in the process.

 

Glad that it helps those who may be new to banknote sealing and also those experienced collectors alike ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not yet used non-plasticized holders for my banknotes, but have for some years with my coins. Only problem I notice with them over the long term, ie like 5 years is that they break down and start developing splits and cracks.

 

I have a large collection of 18th century banknotes which I would like to store in such a fashion that they will be preserved for the long term(one unfortunately was not before I got it, and is disentegrating) Currently I just have these stored in inert paper envelopes in a bank vault.

 

Oil based plastics have very harmful long term consequences, I will image the 1786 Rhode Island 40 Shillings note sometime to show the effects of miserable storage.

 

I once had a 1926 £1 from the North of Scotland Bank that had been stored in a PVC based page, it was completely imbedded with the oils from the PVC page, so when it was sold it sold for a fraction of what the value for the undamaged example would have gone for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have not yet used non-plasticized holders for my banknotes, but have for some years with my coins. Only problem I notice with them over the long term, ie like 5 years is that they break down and start developing splits and cracks.

 

That's true. They crack and splits. In my case, I kept my older collection 20 years ago in the bank vaults as well. All sealed up. A few piece have some cracks and splits. Majority of them are still in relatively good condition. Luckily, non of them are with oil-based PVC sheets. Two days ago, I opened up a few of my 20 years old banknotes plastic sheet. They remained in original condition 20 years ago when I first purchase them. Sealing them does help in protecting our banknotes whether as a collection or for investment.

 

I have a large collection of 18th century banknotes which I would like to store in such a fashion that they will be preserved for the long term(one unfortunately was not before I got it, and is disentegrating) Currently I just have these stored in inert paper envelopes in a bank vault.

 

Oil based plastics have very harmful long term consequences, I will image the 1786 Rhode Island 40 Shillings note sometime to show the effects of miserable storage.

 

Yes, it is very true. They totally destroy the note and it's value.

 

I once had a 1926 £1 from the North of Scotland Bank that had been stored in a PVC based page, it was completely imbedded with the oils from the PVC page, so when it was sold it sold for a fraction of what the value for the undamaged example would have gone for.

 

 

Awaiting to see your picture. :ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice instruction! I can imagine the need for this in your climate!

 

I have received the last Hansatsu notes I bought in a sealed state not unlike what you have done with your notes. As these notes are from the 18th and 19th centuries and they were in a more tropical environment, I can see the benefit of having them sealed. However, as soon as I got them I was worried about the type of plastic used, so I promptly removed them and placed them into my folders.

 

I use the ULTRA-PRO Platinum series holders for all my notes. These are archival, acid free, PVC free, and UV protective. Hopefully there will not be anything bad discovered about them in the years to come! I store them in a fire proof safe, and as yet I haven't noticed any moisture/condensation, but I am considering using some silica gel packs or something anyway.

 

I have never had a note from one of the grading services, but from the photos I have seen of them, I imagine that they use a very similar process to the one you employ.

 

:ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice instruction! I can imagine the need for this in your climate!

Tropical humid climate are a real challenge for banknote collector.

 

I have received the last Hansatsu notes I bought in a sealed state not unlike what you have done with your notes. As these notes are from the 18th and 19th centuries and they were in a more tropical environment, I can see the benefit of having them sealed. However, as soon as I got them I was worried about the type of plastic used, so I promptly removed them and placed them into my folders.

 

Yes, they usually uses cheap plastic sheet from Thailand. But some cheap ones from Thailand are really good. Some turn yellowish over the years but they did not affect the banknotes.

 

I use the ULTRA-PRO Platinum series holders for all my notes. These are archival, acid free, PVC free, and UV protective. Hopefully there will not be anything bad discovered about them in the years to come! I store them in a fire proof safe, and as yet I haven't noticed any moisture/condensation, but I am considering using some silica gel packs or something anyway.

 

In my case, I seal them up and keep them in the bank safe box. I have a huge one for storage and safety. It is usually much dry in the safe box as they have a 24 hours air-con switch on.

 

I have never had a note from one of the grading services, but from the photos I have seen of them, I imagine that they use a very similar process to the one you employ.

 

I have seen some of these sealing from the American grading service company such as PMG, PCGS etc. One of them, I cannot remember which one uses two pieces of thick transparent block of plastic and place them together using bolt and nuts. It's heavy and they have to be taken out in order to be send overseas.

 

Having them sealed up is still the best protection for your investment over the years.

 

:ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

see, what kind of plastic is it? Non-oil? I know it's PVC free but I can't seem to find one on the net.

 

As well as if you don't mind telling me where you get the plastics from, where do you get them from? :ninja:

 

See the next message for reply ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a Germany brand Lighthouse ( Germany brand name is Leuchtturm )which is well-known in stamp album and banknotes album etc . A very old and established brand which produces high quality items relating to numismatics needs. I got those loose sheet of plastic which are originally for banknote album. Since I do not use the banknote album anymore as i kept all my notes sealed up in my safe box.

 

The German website is at : http://www.leuchtturm.com/

 

The US website is http://www.lighthouse.us/

 

In my case, I got them from a local stamp shop.

 

As I have thrown away the front cover sheet stating the model series of these plastic sheet, I believe it should be this model series in the website. I prefer the three pocket type as it does cover most of my needs. In some older banknotes where are much larger, I purchase either a single pocket or a twin pockets.

 

http://www.lighthouse.us/epages/lighthouse...Catalog=C010547

 

I am sure you will have them in your local numismatic shop.

 

:ninja:;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are not concerned about sealing them, you can use Archival Safe sheet protectors and photo pages made by Avery. I have had my collection in them for about 4 years now, and the notes still look great..... :ninja:

 

 

Avery Photo Sheet Protector Link

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
If you are not concerned about sealing them, you can use Archival Safe sheet protectors and photo pages made by Avery. I have had my collection in them for about 4 years now, and the notes still look great..... :ninja:

Avery Photo Sheet Protector Link

 

Lucky you. I don't think there is any problem with cold, dry climate. May have to worry if the weather gets too dry. Sealing your banknote will be a good alternative to protect your banknote from extreme dryness. Remember that when you seal your banknotes, it is a vacuum inside the sealed banknote. Maximum protection ensured.

 

;););)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting, I might have to try that. I think I might do one thing different, I think I might play something other than Kenny G. when I seal banknotes ;);)

 

Maybe a rock piece will help to keep the sealer awake and alert. There should be no room for error when sealing the banknotes since our banknotes are expensive, rare and priceless. I do agree that Kenny G music makes me sleeply at times.

 

:D:D:D:ninja:;);)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice instruction! I can imagine the need for this in your climate!

 

I have received the last Hansatsu notes I bought in a sealed state not unlike what you have done with your notes. As these notes are from the 18th and 19th centuries and they were in a more tropical environment, I can see the benefit of having them sealed. However, as soon as I got them I was worried about the type of plastic used, so I promptly removed them and placed them into my folders.

 

I use the ULTRA-PRO Platinum series holders for all my notes. These are archival, acid free, PVC free, and UV protective. Hopefully there will not be anything bad discovered about them in the years to come! I store them in a fire proof safe, and as yet I haven't noticed any moisture/condensation, but I am considering using some silica gel packs or something anyway.

 

I have never had a note from one of the grading services, but from the photos I have seen of them, I imagine that they use a very similar process to the one you employ.

 

;)

 

Dave - You may want to try sealing for maximum protection and easy handling. Protection from undesirable chemical from handling ( fingers ), extreme dryness, humid and extreme climate. Stop growth of fungus ( in tropical climate ) since it is a vacuum inside the plastic sheet. At around 900 banknotes in your collection, you may only want to seal only those rare and expensive ones to protect your investment and collection. Banknotes collecting have bigger challenges protecting it's condition than coin collecting.

 

;):D:D:ninja:;);)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Interesting, I might have to try that. I think I might do one thing different, I think I might play something other than Kenny G. when I seal banknotes ;);)

 

Great resource for those with more resources than me!

 

But I agree with SM on this point... :ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
This is a Germany brand Lighthouse ( Germany brand name is Leuchtturm )which is well-known in stamp album and banknotes album etc . A very old and established brand which produces high quality items relating to numismatics needs.

 

The German website is at : http://www.leuchtturm.com/

 

The US website is http://www.lighthouse.us/

 

i just took a huge plunge and upgraded to lighthouse vario albums. the 3-ring binders i've been using are regular off-the-shelf, and i wanted something better with dustcovers. i was worried about using regular binders anyway...they're made of vinyl and smell plasticky. even though the notes themselves are in inert 3-pocket pages, does anybody know if the off-gassing from the binder does any harm?

 

part of the plunge meant having to pick up propriety pages, (4-hole pages instead of the standard 3-hole punch). the vario G is the largest album lighthouse makes, but it can only hold 60 pages. that translates to 180 notes stored in transparent 3 pocket pages. i have about 1100 notes in my collection, so i would need SEVEN binders. :ninja: i decided to go with double sided pages so i could cut it down to four, and went ahead and bought a thinner vario F for my US notes. each 3-pocket page has a black background, and the reverse side is pocketed just like the front.

 

my biggest concern now is that i won't be able to see the reverse side of each banknote. but after several days of pondering, i thought about having to spend extra money on more binders, extra money to double the amount of propriety pages (which are expensive to begin with), and the prospect of having to go through 7 different binders just to look at my collection. my mind was made. does anybody else use a system like this? what are your thoughts on only being able to see one side? are you happy with it?

 

variog.jpgkh.jpgvariof3c.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i just took a huge plunge and upgraded to lighthouse vario albums. the 3-ring binders i've been using are regular off-the-shelf, and i wanted something better with dustcovers. i was worried about using regular binders anyway...they're made of vinyl and smell plasticky. even though the notes themselves are in inert 3-pocket pages, does anybody know if the off-gassing from the binder does any harm?

 

part of the plunge meant having to pick up propriety pages, (4-hole pages instead of the standard 3-hole punch). the vario G is the largest album lighthouse makes, but it can only hold 60 pages. that translates to 180 notes stored in transparent 3 pocket pages. i have about 1100 notes in my collection, so i would need SEVEN binders. ;) i decided to go with double sided pages so i could cut it down to four, and went ahead and bought a thinner vario F for my US notes. each 3-pocket page has a black background, and the reverse side is pocketed just like the front.

 

my biggest concern now is that i won't be able to see the reverse side of each banknote. but after several days of pondering, i thought about having to spend extra money on more binders, extra money to double the amount of propriety pages (which are expensive to begin with), and the prospect of having to go through 7 different binders just to look at my collection. my mind was made. does anybody else use a system like this? what are your thoughts on only being able to see one side? are you happy with it?

 

 

I haven't upgraded to this type of system myself for two reasons that you mentioned: The cost and the proprietary materials (which makes it spendy). At this point, I can't justify the money and (what I perceive as) inconvenience of the proprietary materials for my collection. I DID buy a fire-proof safelast November, but I was able to use a National Guard check to get that - and told myself I could keep other things in there as well. I was mainly worried about fire rather than theft.

 

As far as the off-gassing of the binders, well I don't know. I know I've made it worse though. I was using a couple 3 inch D ring binders but they were wont to sag when placed upright, and I was worried about the weight on the notes when placed flat. So... I went with about 6 one inch binders instead... Then, when I added coversheets for countries, black pages for interleaves, and now these "Noteable Notes" things I'm writing for certain banknotes (oh, and my buying more banknotes!) have placed it to about 13 one-inch binders - I use the Office Depot brand which, I would guess being the cheap-o binders, would be the absolute worst for off gassing, but I am just not worried about it as I have the notes placed into the protective sleaves, like you.

 

Now you got me thinkin', though. ... ... :ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

there's one more thing i failed to mention that was another huge factor in "taking the plunge". i picked up quite a few u.s. notes, all uncirculated, all graded by major TPG's. i'm not a fan of slabbed notes, and i was planning on cutting them out and putting them in my albums. ultra-pro pages are great for the most part, but there was one 'minor' issue i had with them that worried me.

 

i'm not sure if all ultra-pro pages are like this, but i bought about six factory-sealed boxes a few years back. i even sold a few extras to several coinpeople. in every single box, the pages were "curled" instead of being perfectly flat. their pages are also relatively thin. i'm having serious reservations about cutting out a gem 66 EPQ and placing it in a thin, curled up ultra-pro. if even just one $1000+ note was made worse because i didn't want to spring for better storage, i would be kicking myself. i went with vario plus pages, which are stronger and stiffer than the regular vario pages. yeah, it's pretty darned expensive, but it's still only a small fraction of what the overall value of the entire collection is worth.

 

dave, what mos/unit are you with? do you know if you're joining in on the fun anytime soon? were you "lucky" enough to be part of the 12,000 guardsman they're bringing over? i'm drawing bah pay from san diego, and along with hazardous duty/hostile fire/tax-free pay, i was able to 'go crazy' on stuff that wasn't even an option a year ago. :ninja:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i just took a huge plunge and upgraded to lighthouse vario albums. the 3-ring binders i've been using are regular off-the-shelf, and i wanted something better with dustcovers. i was worried about using regular binders anyway...they're made of vinyl and smell plasticky. even though the notes themselves are in inert 3-pocket pages, does anybody know if the off-gassing from the binder does any harm?

 

part of the plunge meant having to pick up propriety pages, (4-hole pages instead of the standard 3-hole punch). the vario G is the largest album lighthouse makes, but it can only hold 60 pages. that translates to 180 notes stored in transparent 3 pocket pages. i have about 1100 notes in my collection, so i would need SEVEN binders. :ninja: i decided to go with double sided pages so i could cut it down to four, and went ahead and bought a thinner vario F for my US notes. each 3-pocket page has a black background, and the reverse side is pocketed just like the front.

 

my biggest concern now is that i won't be able to see the reverse side of each banknote. but after several days of pondering, i thought about having to spend extra money on more binders, extra money to double the amount of propriety pages (which are expensive to begin with), and the prospect of having to go through 7 different binders just to look at my collection. my mind was made. does anybody else use a system like this? what are your thoughts on only being able to see one side? are you happy with it?

 

variog.jpgkh.jpgvariof3c.jpg

 

When I started collecting banknotes in 1986, some collectors recommended the ones in the pictures with dustcover. It is pretty good especially when you take them out to enjoy your collection. I got three album - brown, black and navy blue. To overcome the problem of able to see both side of the note, I seal my note and make handling of the note much easier. I will take them out from the pocket to view them whenever I need to. After looking at the note on both side, I slip them back. I started adding new black hard pages. The album bcome very heavy. In the end, I have no choice but to take all the notes out from the binders and store them in the safe deposit box. It is not possible to put the binders into the safe deposit box as they are huge and heavy. Now I used them for those inexpensive banknotes. But it is still a good album for displaying the banknotes collection. It is a quality product. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...