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Pair Of Pretty Ladys


LostDutchman
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Weren't these part of a hoard of large cents from the 1820s? I read somewhere about piles of these being stored in barrels, all dated 1818 with those same die cracks almost circling the obverse. Neat coins!

 

They're part of the "Randall Hoard", a keg of LC's discovered post-civil war. Accounts of the hoard vary with the best being given in Bowers' "American Coin Hoards and Treasures". Based on the historical accounts and noting what is common today, the hoard is thought to have consisted of several varieties with the 3 most common being 18N10, 20N13 and 20N15.

 

18N10 is perhaps the most common middle date with, as Noyes says, "thousands in mint state". I would not be surprised at 3k - 4k in mint with an equal number in near mint. 20N13 is almost as common.

 

Lostdutchman's pieces are nice examples of a later state 18N10 with heavy flow lines from the the stars and letters to the rim (die erosion).

 

The reverse die (G) was a "workhorse die" previously used on 18N8. Given the average die life of 350K strikes in 1818, this reverse had to last a good 600K.

 

Arcing die cracks thru the stars and/or letters are fairly common on middle date cents. The relatively close spaced and deeply punched stars and letters create stress points in the die and the dies subsequently crack thru these points due to the stress of coining.

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They're part of the "Randall Hoard", a keg of LC's discovered post-civil war. Accounts of the hoard vary with the best being given in Bowers' "American Coin Hoards and Treasures". Based on the historical accounts and noting what is common today, the hoard is thought to have consisted of several varieties with the 3 most common being 18N10, 20N13 and 20N15.

 

18N10 is perhaps the most common middle date with, as Noyes says, "thousands in mint state". I would not be surprised at 3k - 4k in mint with an equal number in near mint. 20N13 is almost as common.

 

Lostdutchman's pieces are nice examples of a later state 18N10 with heavy flow lines from the the stars and letters to the rim (die erosion).

 

The reverse die (G) was a "workhorse die" previously used on 18N8. Given the average die life of 350K strikes in 1818, this reverse had to last a good 600K.

 

Arcing die cracks thru the stars and/or letters are fairly common on middle date cents. The relatively close spaced and deeply punched stars and letters create stress points in the die and the dies subsequently crack thru these points due to the stress of coining.

 

 

Great info,

 

And as for the coins, WOW X 1000, I'd love to own a pair of those ladies. Heck, even one.....in Xf would make me a happy fox. :ninja:

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they are dark.... with some very nice luster

 

 

As much as I like a nice red, or chocolate large cent, I've come to appreciate the darker coins. Copper normally wouldn't stay a nice brown after almost 200 years, they show true to form what an old copper should look like, when stored under normal conditions. Those are really choice in my book.

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I have to say. Coinpeople is a double-edged sword. yes, I've learned about die variety collecting (I think I'm gonna be addicted to it) which will be fun to collect

 

but sadly, you guys make me want to stray from my series sets and pick up a few type beauties such as those two above.

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Those are awesome Matt !!! :ninja:

 

You keeping both of 'em?

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