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I've just joined 'Coins' (that dancing banana is enough reason to join in itself). Recently come across a bunch of Australian 1966 50 cent coins and their history has sparked my interest.

 

Anyways, here's my question - is there a website, an email list or some sort of notification place that will alert me when a country issues significantly new bank notes?

 

While trolling around the net and eBay, I was suprised at how valuable a lousy $1 Australian note (lousy in terms of investment - it's an interesting looking note) from 1966 was (when Australia converted from English-type weirdo currency to decimal currency with a new issue of everything).

 

With foresight and a relatively long live, I figure collecting new issues of currency could net enough money to make them worth hanging on to.

 

Is this right, or am I misled, deluded and stark raving?

 

By the way, was flicking through some posts and noticed people talking about 'star' notes (with stars next to the serial number). What's the star all about? Are they currency for movie actors or something?

 

Thanks all! Any curious info about the Australian 1966 50 cent coins would be fed into interested ears (by me reading through interested eyes and talking to myself) too!

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Hello and welcome to coinpeople :ninja:

 

I am not too sure if there is a homepage that shows you the newest banknotes releases. Perhaps the IBNS (International BankNote Society) will update you with the newest infomation but I don't know where it is at and if it does cost.

 

That said, if you are looking for banknotes as investments, I would say it's a bad idea. Numismatics shouldn't really be taken as investment options and rarely would you see modern banknotes as popular, often face value and a little bit of prenium over time unless it had some unusual errors or low serial numbers etc. Remember Economics 101 - supply and value. If there are many printed, how would you expect them to become "rare" unless everyone is dumb and circulated them all and you are the only one who kept them in prestine condition or for some reason, everyone wants a piece of the banknote.

 

The Australian 50 cent coins are pretty neat. It is a pity that it's just a one year type release and people complained that because it looked too similar to the Aussie 20 cent piece, it was soon redesigned with cheaper metal and is the very last coin ever released in precious metals. If you got it for face value, good for it - the metal value of it has shot up to at least 10 times its face value ;)

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I've just joined 'Coins' (that dancing banana is enough reason to join in itself). Recently come across a bunch of Australian 1966 50 cent coins and their history has sparked my interest.

 

Anyways, here's my question - is there a website, an email list or some sort of notification place that will alert me when a country issues significantly new bank notes?

 

While trolling around the net and eBay, I was suprised at how valuable a lousy $1 Australian note (lousy in terms of investment - it's an interesting looking note) from 1966 was (when Australia converted from English-type weirdo currency to decimal currency with a new issue of everything).

 

With foresight and a relatively long live, I figure collecting new issues of currency could net enough money to make them worth hanging on to.

 

Is this right, or am I misled, deluded and stark raving?

 

By the way, was flicking through some posts and noticed people talking about 'star' notes (with stars next to the serial number). What's the star all about? Are they currency for movie actors or something?

 

Thanks all! Any curious info about the Australian 1966 50 cent coins would be fed into interested ears (by me reading through interested eyes and talking to myself) too!

 

Star notes are replacement notes. When notes are printed with error and if they are detected, they will be replace with a star note or replacement note. Sometimes you will find a star note in a stack of new banknotes.

 

In USA, they are known as star note. In some earlier issued of Australian and NZ banknotes, they are also using a star either in place in front or behind the serial number.

 

Most of the other countries such as Singapore, Malaysia,UK etc, uses the term replacement note. They do not use a star to distinguish that it is a replacement note. Instead during the earlier issued banknotes, they uses Z/1, Z/2, ZZ etc. Today, some countries are still still using the "Z" letter as a replacement.

 

In Singapore ( which is where I came from ), changes the tradditional letter "Z" to some other letter to denote replacement notes. They uses JJ, FF etc. It is rather confusing for collectors.

 

The used of letter "Z" as a replacement note has something to do with the printer TDLR. Most of the early British Colony countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, Bemuda etc were printed by TDLR. Naturally, they follow a certain standard in determing the use of "Z" letter as a replacement note.

 

Whether it is known as a star note or a replacement note, there is still a group of collectors collecting them. I have an example of a replacement note with a solid number 555555 from my country in my collection.

 

Ship-50-Z1-555555ReplacementNote.jpg

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Thanks for the good advice - auctions like this one were making me think I was onto something:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/1968-Phillips-Randa...1QQcmdZViewItem

 

So now I've learnt it's a star note and different people sign Australian notes making certain issues less common than others, makes sense.

 

Still, that's a well-paying note for someone with the right foresight.

 

Was reading recently that they flew something like 25 747's full of new notes to Iraq in '03 for new currency.

 

Thanks for the info!

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Thanks for the good advice - auctions like this one were making me think I was onto something:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/1968-Phillips-Randa...1QQcmdZViewItem

 

So now I've learnt it's a star note and different people sign Australian notes making certain issues less common than others, makes sense.

 

Still, that's a well-paying note for someone with the right foresight.

 

Was reading recently that they flew something like 25 747's full of new notes to Iraq in '03 for new currency.

 

Thanks for the info!

 

Those aussie banknotes supposingly scarce ones are very much overpriced and over-speculated by Australian collectors and dealers. Just be careful. You may end up losing money if you do not have full knowledge about them. :ninja:

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In Sweden you can get a swedish 10kr (from the last series 1963-90) star note for little over 10kr, even if it is uncirculated. They were not made in big quantites relative to the common banknotes, but as they were hoarded by the people working in banks there are many uncirculated, for the collectors. Estimated 1 in every 1000 banknotes is a star note, from swedish banknote printing.

If this is true, it means that for instance the 10kr 1966 starnote was made in above 20 000ex. of about 24.44 million released that year. Probably many of them were saved for the collectors.

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Anyways, here's my question - is there a website, an email list or some sort of notification place that will alert me when a country issues significantly new bank notes?

 

Welcome to the forum, and to a great hobby!

 

I maintain www.banknotenews.com, and I strive to publish reports with images of all new notes issued worldwide, including completely new designs as well as new varieties. Take a look and let me know what you think.

 

Also, I recommend you consider joining the IBNS. As part of your membership benefits, you'll receive the IBNS Journal and Inside IBNS newsletter, which are great sources for unbiased info about notes. I've attached a membership application. More info can be found at www.theIBNS.org.

_IBNS_application_form.pdf

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  • 1 month later...
Star notes are replacement notes. When notes are printed with error and if they are detected, they will be replace with a star note or replacement note. Sometimes you will find a star note in a stack of new banknotes.

 

In USA, they are known as star note. In some earlier issued of Australian and NZ banknotes, they are also using a star either in place in front or behind the serial number.

 

Most of the other countries such as Singapore, Malaysia,UK etc, uses the term replacement note. They do not use a star to distinguish that it is a replacement note. Instead during the earlier issued banknotes, they uses Z/1, Z/2, ZZ etc. Today, some countries are still still using the "Z" letter as a replacement.

 

In Singapore ( which is where I came from ), changes the tradditional letter "Z" to some other letter to denote replacement notes. They uses JJ, FF etc. It is rather confusing for collectors.

 

The used of letter "Z" as a replacement note has something to do with the printer TDLR. Most of the early British Colony countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, Bemuda etc were printed by TDLR. Naturally, they follow a certain standard in determing the use of "Z" letter as a replacement note.

 

Whether it is known as a star note or a replacement note, there is still a group of collectors collecting them. I have an example of a replacement note with a solid number 555555 from my country in my collection.

 

Ship-50-Z1-555555ReplacementNote.jpg

 

 

Thanks see323,

 

I learn alot about 'starnotes and replacement notes' today onwards i will look out for the letter 'Z' whenever i start to purchase note in ebay. :ninja:

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