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What does it take to get into the numismatic field?


gxseries
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I would say any long time collector could be considered a numismatist. Any person who has spent many many many nights studying money and medals and learning about the history. I posted this the other day on another forum:

 

nu·mis·mat·ics The study or collection of money, coins, and often medals

 

Numismatics is not just the study of money, it encompasses history, art, archeology and borrows bits from geology, mathematics, metallurgy, economics, statistics, genealogy, sociology, and government. Numismatists studying coins, banknotes, stock certificates, medals, medallions, and tokens. It is a field almost as ancient as the money and medals it studies.

 

A coin collector is not a numismatist, but can be. A numismatist is almost always a coin collector or a collector of money and medals. It is more than just collecting, it is a desire to discover the history, minute details of the monetary system in general whether modern or in antiquity. A trained eye for detail and a good memory is a must.

 

Collecting coins often leads to expertise in that field thus Numismatists almost always are collectors of coins often specializing in general aspects such as World or Ancients, Paper, Coin or even further specializing in more specific areas of interest such as Conder Tokens, coins of one era in time, coins of one country, one ruler, etc.

 

Every coin, every bill, every medal is a small piece of history that helps paint a picture of the society it was made for. The time, the place, the man, the government, current concerns, Past accomplishments, political propaganda, or just pleasing designs....all in the palm of your hand and more often than not there are thousands more just like it. Money serves an important historical purpose as well as its primary purposes being propaganda and a system of exchange and valuation. Along with its primary purpose for commerce all money has a message from the government, the ruler, or the society to the populous who spends that money, the world, and the future generations that coin makers know will be their audience.

 

Currency is a great visual and tactic way to take a look into another culture or another time in human history. It is a great device for learning as there are a wide range of choices at just as wide ranging prices. Un-cleaned roman coins are a cheap affordable way to introduce young people to archeology, numismatics and make learning history fun and hands on. A jar of coins from around the world is a great way to help teach students about another culture.

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Makes me wonder - what does it take to get into the numismatic field? (slightly offtopic since I am looking for a full time job)

 

An editor? Historian? Scientist?

 

I'm sure there are many fields related to the numismatic field, but what does it take to get involved in such? :ninja:

Back to YOUR question. The most important thing is MONEY. Lots of things are important in this field but you will need money to really get started doing anything in this field for a living. For a full time job in this field, that depends on where you live primarily. If in a large city area just look up coin dealers and go there and apply for a job. They would usually ask how much you know of this subject and if you say nothing, you'll still get hired but for a much lower wage. This is apparent in the places in the Chicago area here. Go to a coin store or many dealers at coin shows and you run into people that are selling things they know nothing about. Sort of like people working at Sears or Walmart. If you want to become a coin dealer you will need an inventory and that takes money. For a full time job I wouldn't suggest this field without a large amount of capital.

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Makes me wonder - what does it take to get into the numismatic field? (slightly offtopic since I am looking for a full time job)

 

An editor? Historian? Scientist?

 

I'm sure there are many fields related to the numismatic field, but what does it take to get involved in such? :ninja:

 

It requires only one thing - a strong desire to do so.

 

Of course having a strong desire to do so also implies a willingness to do the study necessary for one to acquire the requisite knowledge and become proficient in your chosen field. And the more knowledge you acquire, and the more proficient you become - the more in demand you will be and thus the more money you will make. It's like any other trade, the best get paid the most.

 

Now some think that a person in the numismatic field might not make a lot of money. And in some cases that is true. The counter help in a local coin shop for example, no they don't make much. But a professional grader, and one that is good at it - they can make over $250,000 a year. A numismatist at a large auction company - one who authenticates and catalogs the coins for upcoming auctions - well over 6 figures annually.

 

I call that good money. And what did they have to spend to get there ? Time mostly, and the cost of the books they used for study. In other words, not much. All that was necessary was the desire to do so.

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