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Early Imperial Silver commemorative ruble edge difference


gxseries

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By early 1720s, Russia had the technology to have text extruding from the coins. By 1810ish, all of the Russian rubles would have text engraved in the edge. (except patterns which I can possibly miss out on)

 

But for some reason, the early commemorative ruble, like the Column ruble and the Borodin ruble were reeded. The latter ones of the 1859 and 1883 rubles were smooth edged.

 

Why? I know the commemorative rubles weren't popular when they are first out but why was there an edge difference?

 

Was it because it was engraved by a different mint master (Gube is not Russian - he is German by the way) and St. Petersburg didn't have the time / couldn't be bothered to make new collars for the coins? Or was it simply because it was made to differentiate from the normal rubles? But why the change in the 1896 Coronation ruble?

 

I don't really understand why at the moment. Was there any specific reason for this?

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By early 1720s, Russia had the technology to have text extruding from the coins. By 1810ish, all of the Russian rubles would have text engraved in the edge. (except patterns which I can possibly miss out on)

But for some reason, the early commemorative ruble, like the Column ruble and the Borodin ruble were reeded. The latter ones of the 1859 and 1883 rubles were smooth edged.

Why? I know the commemorative rubles weren't popular when they are first out but why was there an edge difference?

Was it because it was engraved by a different mint master (Gube is not Russian - he is German by the way) and St. Petersburg didn't have the time / couldn't be bothered to make new collars for the coins? Or was it simply because it was made to differentiate from the normal rubles? But why the change in the 1896 Coronation ruble?

I don't really understand why at the moment. Was there any specific reason for this?

The use of a reeded edge appears to have been tied to the technology of the times. For the regular rouble coinage of the 1830s the edge was lettered prior to striking. When the lettered-edge planchet dropped into the coining press to be struck there was only a 'loose' collar which centered the planchet between the upper and lower dies. When struck, the coin expanded slightly outwards.

 

Pieces with reeded edges were struck in a 'close' collar, which gave the coin its edge reeding at the time of striking. This meant that the coin struck in a collar usually had better details from the dies. In other words, coins struck in a 'close' collar are better made, which is the point of a commemorative.

 

RWJ

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