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Same planchet used but for different countries?


gxseries
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This was something I noticed while I was playing around with my coins.

 

The coins that I was playing around are:

 

Australia 1947 1 penny

S. Africa 1940 1 d

UK 1967 1 penny

Ireland 1965 1 eire

 

(photograph will come later when I fix my awful camera)

 

What is interesting is that the size of all planchets are exactly the same, i.e. diameter and thickness and the weight of each one of them is around 9.3 to 9.4grams since I have an inaccurate gram scale.

 

I guess this was done in the past because of the past British Commonwealth relations.

 

Are there any other such stories used in other countries other than the Euros? Perhaps the Aussie and the Kiwi old coins with the 5, 10 and 20 cents coins? Fuji? Western Somoa? I kind of remember there was an interesting Jamaican 10 pence that was the same size of a British one. Azerbjistan (sorry, can't remember how to spell it) seems to be another example - I think Kuhli had an interesting example of them.

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When two or more countries have a monetary union, coins that have the same size are not a problem or may even make sense. The Irish punt, for example, had exactly the same value as the British pound until 1979 or 1980.

 

In Europe before the euro, the coins from Monaco has the same specifications as the French pieces; the same applies to the "lira area" (Italy, San Marino, Vatican). And precious metal coins from former times are a different story anyway.

 

As for the Irish coin, "Eire" is just the Irish name of the country. What you have there is probably a 1 penny (pingin) coin ...

 

Christian

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The same thing it's about the copper, silver and gold coins from Spain, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Italy, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Switzerland from 1860's to WWI.

For example, the copper Serbian 10 Para coin 1879 had the same planchet like Luxembourg 10 Centimes, or Italia 10 centesimi, etc... At that time many eurpean countries adopted the standards of the Union Monetaire Latine: 5 grams of 800 silver for the 1 franc, peseta, lira dinar, leu, etc and 6.45 grams of 900 gold for the coin of 20...

Many of my european friends are focused on that particular period coins from the countries listed above.

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Virtually all Empire/Commonwealth pre-decimal are the same as you noted

ie. c/n UK 2s, UK 10p, Australia 20c, NZ florin, NZ 20c

 

And same of course for most of the countries issuing to LMU standards. (I haven't added pieces for a while, but I have a collection of world 2.5g .900/.835 silver coins)

 

I've seen a Ghana coin that was very simular to the pound.

 

Some examples that I can think of include...

USA zinc 1c 1943 used for Belgium 2F 1944

USA billon 5c 1942-45 used for Dominican Republic 5c 1944

French (various denominations) used for Saarland pieces

 

Simular planchets would have to include the thick planchet c/n Peru 1c and USA 1c of the 1800s.

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As a collector of Russian coins, you may find interesting that the Mongolian coins of 1920's and 1930's are similar in sizes and materials to the coins of the USSR. They were in fact made in there, and one togrog was equal to one rouble.

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The same thing it's about the copper, silver and gold coins from Spain, France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Italy, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Switzerland from 1860's to WWI.

For example, the copper Serbian 10 Para coin 1879 had the same planchet like Luxembourg 10 Centimes, or Italia 10 centesimi, etc... At that time many eurpean countries adopted the standards of the Union Monetaire Latine: 5 grams of 800 silver for the 1 franc, peseta, lira dinar, leu, etc and 6.45 grams of 900 gold for the coin of 20...

Many of my european friends are focused on that particular period coins from the countries listed above.

 

Add in Poland and Russia for LMU denominated or equivalent coins also. Poland issued them right after WWI, and Russia with the 7.5 and 15 Rubles which were the equivalent of 20 LMU and 40 LMU.

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i suppose there must be a database somewhere where you plug in the dimensions of a coin and you get back the closest matches in size and weight ...

Great. "Hmm, is there any coin worth about 10 cents that a vending machine might accept as a €2 piece? Let's consult the database ..." :ninja:

 

But actually the Mint Directors Conference has something like that. It is called the Coin Registration Office, currently hosted by the "Monnaie de Paris" in Pessac. See http://www.coinro.org/ But quite obviously not even all MDC member mints/countries consult that CRO database before issuing new coins ...

 

(By the way, the "database" that is publicly accessible is neither very detailed nor up-to-date. I sincerely hope they have something more useful for internal use. ;) )

 

Christian

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Are there any other such stories used in other countries other than the Euros?

 

 

This scenario goes back to ancient times. It was common practice for ruling nations to have the countries under their control issue coinage of different designs and denominations in their own nations but based on the same weight of the coinage used in the ruling nation. It was all because of trade and it kept trade inequalities to a minimum.

 

For example, the ruling nation could send its ships to the countries under their control, purchase items they wished to import back home, pay for the goods with local currency of the same value ( based on weight ) in their home nation. Then when ships reached home port they could sell the goods for their own currency. Thus the merchants of the ruling nation were ensured they were not losing money based on unequal currency exchange.

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Just a small addition:

 

The coinage of Belgium and Luxembourg have been the same dimensions since WW2. Here in Belgium, the coins of Luxembourg were used as our own. I don't know the exact reason for this. Just something I've noticed through time, collecting Belgian coins.

 

Regards

 

Jos

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Here in Belgium, the coins of Luxembourg were used as our own. I don't know the exact reason for this.

Belgium and Luxembourg have been in a monetary union long before the euro came. :ninja: The first monetary agreement was made in the early 1920s. The Belgian coins and notes were legal tender in Luxembourg too. (Not sure whether this worked the other way round too, but "de facto" it did, as you mentioned.) Before 1998 Luxembourg did not even have a full fledged central bank ...

 

Christian

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I need to look into Thailand. I have, on numerous occasions, come across the 10 baht posing as a €2 coin here. :ninja:

 

On a related note, appearently some merchants in Italy try passing off 500L as E2 pieces to unsuspecting tourists.

 

I would had thought that in the past several years people have heard enoungh about the 10 baht to pay some attention... it is somewhat different...

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I would had thought that in the past several years people have heard enoungh about the 10 baht to pay some attention... it is somewhat different...

Actually, if the two were not (a little) different, the European Union would be the one to blame. ;) The EU laid down the specifications of the €2 coins in 1998. Well, that is AFAIK when the 10 baht coins started to circulate in Thailand.

 

Machines can tell them apart anyway. The 10 baht pieces - and also the Turkish 1 lira coins, for example - are not magnetic; the €2 pieces are. Also, the "euro doppelgangers" from Turkey are a little lighter than the €1 and €2 coins. But customers and cashiers in a store do not always check the change very thoroughly, and so ... :ninja:

 

Christian

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How about the Azerbaijan coins like this (from Kuhli's collection)

Right, the designer of the euro notes also designed the new manat coins and notes:

http://www.coinpeople.com/index.php?s=&amp...st&p=220202

 

They were minted/printed in Austria. But there are a few differences (e.g. size, edge) between them and the euro and cent coins. So whether these are actually the same planchets, I don't know. The similarities of the euro, lira and baht coins discussed here do in my opinion not mean that the same planchets were used. In the case of UK/Ireland and Belgium/Luxembourg that is probably different ...

 

Christian

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