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Now you know where our counterfeits are coming from


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Wow, vey rare S mint die from 1841. San Francisco had no idea it would be honourable mint for rare coins of USA

 

There's a perfectly logical explanation for that since they aren't for the same coin! The obverse is for a seated dollar but the reverse is for a trade dollar. These are two "geniune" dies from different coins!

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There's a perfectly logical explanation for that since they aren't for the same coin! The obverse is for a seated dollar but the reverse is for a trade dollar. These are two "geniune" dies from different coins!

 

 

Actually they very well could be for the same coin. If they didn't want a ridiculous equivalent of $4-5 each for them, I would have bought a whole bunch of them in Guangzhou last Spring. The 1805 Peace Dollar, the 1978 Morgan etc.

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<First one is now gone. Too bad, it would have made a great wax seal for birthday cards and such.>

 

And would have been good for a $5,000 fine and 15 years in prison. (US Code Title 18 Sec 487 )

 

The Chinese dies are also good for a $5,000 fine but only 5 years in prison. (US Code Title 18 Sec 488 )

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From what I hear, it is illegal to counterfiet in China, but it's not enforced. So in otherwords, those are illegal everywhere, but you can only have them there lol. Gatta hand it to them though, anything for a buck eh?

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From what I hear, it is illegal to counterfiet in China, but it's not enforced. So in otherwords, those are illegal everywhere, but you can only have them there lol. Gatta hand it to them though, anything for a buck eh?

In Chinese history, a copy is as good as an original. There was no stigma attached to copies, unless they were made to defraud the government. People who made counterfeit coins were often put to work for the government making money. Counterfeiting paper money was not allowed, however. The Ming notes have a clause about counterfeiting- The person who denounces a counterfeiter will be rewarded with a certain amount of money from the counterfeiter's possessions, and the counterfeiter will be put to death. Coins circulated by weight of metal, so it was not quite so bad an offence. There were cases where, for many years, the government mints issued counterfeit coins- half of the coins issued were normal, and half of the coins were of a much smaller weight. The extra money created was shared, all the way into the Imperial Council. (Kang Hsi period- years 41 to 61, 1702-1722). The mints involved were both of the Beijing mints- Board of Revenue and Board of Works. Many of the provincial mints also were issuing light weight cash, and they were forced to close by 1702.

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Perhaps you've seen some of the old Continental Currency that states " 'tis death to counterfeit".

I wouldn't touch those dies with a ten foot pole. I really wouldn't want to be in the same room with them. The whole "guilt by association" thing would ride my conscience into the ground. Do you think that some of the counterfeit Russian coins are being made in China? Maybe a lot of the other fakes are being made there.

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Where are the 1804 silver dollar dies? I know a guy who swings a mighty mallot...why are most surprised by this China connection? I thought by now that all CNPPL realized where all that crap was coming from...

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<What about the quater dies the mint sells?>

 

Those are genuine dies and perfectly legal to own.

 

China ia the source for a huge number of counterfeit coins I have seen counterfeits of Chinese, Japanese, US, Great Britain, Hong Kong, Phillipines, Russia, Mexico, Peru, and there are probably many more.

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But the dies that the mint sells are ground down to nothingness -- really a waste of time -- except for the commem dies they once offered -- they were the actual working dies with an 'X' cut through and super cool!

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